Jul 302015
 

Hello Steve and Brandon,

Photography has been a hobby for me over the last 18 months, and this blog is one of my favorite in terms of stopping by for some quick inspiration. I particularly love this Daily inspiration idea, and looked forward to the day that I would be comfortable to share some of my images. I’m an American expat working in Africa, and spend a lot of time during the year traveling. This in principal is what led me to photography as a means to document my various adventures. I initially started with a full frame DSLRss, but finally settled on a Fuji setup that I’m very happy with.

The images I am submitting today are from a trip late last year to north Thailand. My wife and I visited Anantara Elephant Camp with Lee Craker, whom we discovered through this site. The trip was absolutely memorable with 3 full days spent with the Mahouts and their noble elephants. Images below were taken with both a D800 with the 24-70 F2.8 & 70-200 F2.8, and also Fuji Xpro1 and 56mm F1.2.

My Tumblr
My Flickr

Thanks for the opportunity to share.

Regards
Chez

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Jul 282015
 

Hi Guys,

I’ve really enjoyed your site lots of good photography here and not a whole lot of the negative vibes I find on other sites.

I’ve been using the Sony A7 for a while now and have really moved into black and white. I’m using old minolta lenses like 20 2.8 and 35-70 F4 along with Voigtlander 40 1.4 and 28 2.0. I live in Massachusetts with easy access to the surrounding states and diverse landscapes. These were taken in Newport, RI. It is such an old and cool seaport town, many great things to photograph.

My site is www.erictoddphotography.com

All the best,
Eric

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Jul 242015
 

Hi Steve and Brandon,

First of all thanks for a great website! I visit your site weekly and it has been one of the main inspirations for me to start  my own journey into photography. I’m a Danish guy living in Bangkok close to Chinatown. Street photography has become an important way for me to relate to a culture so different from my own, and are bringing back the curiosity I had for the place when I first arrived 8 years ago.

The picture of the monk shaving his friends head was taken at Wat Thong Thammachat in Thonburi, Bangkok.  The temple is from the Ayutthaya period, before Bangkok was the capital of Thailand. Thonburi is one of my favourite places to shoot, and is a very laid back area compared to downtown Bangkok.

The cockfight picture is shoot close to my own neighbourhood. I have been trying to avoid cockfights as I wasn’t sure how I would react to it, but when I started taking pictures of this young boy and his rooster, his father arrange a quick little fight in my honour. It was clearly that the boy was closely connected with this gamecock, and didn’t like it when his cock took some beating. It was less aggressive than I thought it would be, but then again, this wasn’t a real match.

The street portrait is also from my neighbourhood. The old man used to be an engineer, but didn’t managed to save enough for his pension, and are now working as a valet for a restaurant in the area. He has a wonderful personality,  and are always good for a story.

The first two pictures are taken with a Sony A7II, with the Loxia 2/50, and the picture of the engineer with a Sony RX1.

Hope you enjoyed the pictures. If you would like to see more, please visit my Flickr page at: https://www.flickr.com/ photos/bangkokexposure/

Best regards,

Peter Griebel

 

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Jul 222015
 

Hi Steve & Brandon,

I have been a faithful reader of your site and have been enjoying articles and photographs posted from time to time by your readers and yourself. I have recently bought an Olympus EM5 mark II and have had a chance to try it out at Bali. I also had a chance to use the m.Zuiko Pro 40-150 F2.8 lens from borrowing it from a friend of mine on the same trip.  Although this is not my first time to Bali, this is actually the first time I go to Bali for the sole purpose of taking photographs. The island is really rich in their culture and a wonderful place for photographer which I will definitely do this again next time.

I enjoyed using the new EM5 II very much and with the Pro 40-150 F2.8 lens, it gives me a great image quality and versatility that I have never really experienced before until now. I’m thinking of getting the 40-150mm lens once I could afford it and hope that will be real soon. Below are some of the shots taken mainly with the 40-150mm on the EM5 II for sharing. The 5-axis stabilizer used with the zoom lens is really a great combination and I have accompanied the last shot with the lens on a moving vehicle.

Thanks for reading this and more can be seen at https://www.flickr.com/kwaek/

EK Kwa

Worshipers at a nearby Ubud temple, 40-150mm F2.8 @ 57mm, f2.8, 1/1250 secs, ISO 200

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Ubud morning Market, 40-150mm f2.8 @ 40mm, 2.8, 1/2500 secs, ISO 200

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Ubud morning Market, 40-150mm F2.8 @ 142mm, f2.8, 1/800 secs, ISO 200

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Mt. Batur valcano shot on a moving vehicle, 40-150mm F2.8 @ 73mm, f2.8, 1/5000 secs, ISO 200

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Jul 212015
 

Hey Steve and Brandon.

My Fuji X100T has just arrived, and I thought I’d share some of the pictures from my first morning walk. I decided to go to a spot I know well. I mean it’s hard enough to get to know a camera for the first time, if you add to that a location you don’t know… well you get the picture!

This is big! At least for me. I have alway loved street photography, but never had the nerve to go out and take pictures of random people in the street. And since my main camera is a Canon 7D, It’s kinda hard to be unnoticed when that damn shutter claps away!! I mean, It’s called “Cannon” wright?!

Well, I guess there’s a first time for everything, and this was my first time shooting street action. And, let me tell you, I couldn’t be more pleased with it; both the performance from the Fuji X100T and the resulting images. Some say “Well it’s ok and everything, but ist’s no full frame!” to what I respond “Sure it’s not, but I’m not getting payed for my images (I’m not a professional photographer) ; and even if I was, an APS-C Type sensor is more than capable of producing great images.You don’t need full frame for that!”

Others gasp “It’s only 16 megapixels, wright?!”; what leads to a sligtly grumpy response from my part “Why would I need more? I don’t print mural nor building sized photos! I rarely print photos, which I regret; and when I do the biggest prints are 8×10. So I guess 16 megapixels is more than enough. Not to mention the storage space it saves me!”. Oh and don’t get me started on that whole lightroom RAW development “issue”. I know that, probably, there are other softwares that might be “better” at developing Fuj RAW files. And that if you sharpen the crap out of your images in Lightroom you might get the watercolor effect. Honestly, I didn’t notice it when I developed my pictures with this camera. Then again, I’m not looking at my files at 200%!! Just kidding, or maybe not !-)

No really; I know It’s not perfect. Although I love the X100T, I’m not blind to all it’s flaws. But like all good partnerships, It doesn’t come without it’s quirks. I’ll just have to know, what and where they are so I can deal with them.

All in all, It’s just a fun camera to shoot. At least for me!! But enough talking, here are a few shots from my walk.

 

 A father and a son, turn as they hear a helicopter flyby. The kid, of course, stares at the boats; while the father searches for the helicopter.

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Keep in mind, this place is full of people wlaking and running. But somehow, this guy just seemed slightly off. I don’t know why but, Johnny Walker comes to mind!
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This lady had a very gracious walk, she could have been Grace Kelly’s long lost sister. Not that she had one!
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Thaks guys, and keep up the good work.
Bye for now.
João Vieira
Jul 202015
 

Dear Steve and Brandon, Dear readers of this section.

This is my second post on the daily inspiration section. ( first post was about india http://www.stevehuffphoto.com/2014/10/30/daily-inspiration-705-by-benjamin-vanhuyse/)

I’m a french photographer who lives in Lille in the north of France and lately I got to travel to Madagascar to take pictures for an NGO.

You may follow me on instagram @benvanphotos

Mr Aubin is a teacher at the St Joseph Catholic school in Toliaria, Madagascar.
During this one hour lesson, Mr Aubin teaches French to his student who prepare for a test at the end of the year to reach the next class level.
Many Malagasy children study in overcrowded classrooms with few learning materials but Mr Aubin’s classroom is one of the few which benefits from the Christian community financial backing that allows to give a better education to children.

For this short photo essay, I was interested in how the children interact with their teacher and how they behave in the classroom.
Mr Aubin is fatherly figure whom the children respect and sometimes tease in a gentle way. He engages with his pupils to get the best out of them.
It reminded me of my own classroom memories and I realized the codes in this classroom were the same as they were in mine.

Benjamin Vanhuyse

 

The lesson has just started and Mr Aubin can already hear children chatting at the back of the classroom.

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Mr Aubin wanders around the classroom to help students during the lesson.

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A boy stands up to try and fill in a gap on the blackboard during the lesson.

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A pupil searches for the answer in her conjugation table book to finish off the exercise.

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​Natacha jumps up to erase the blackboard at the end of the lesson.

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Jul 182015
 

Hey Steve and Brandon.

My Fuji X100T has just arrived, and I thought I’d share some of the pictures from my first morning walk. I decided to go to a spot I know well. I mean it’s hard enough to get to know a camera for the first time, if you add to that a location you don’t know… well you get the picture!

This is big! At least for me. I have alway loved street photography, but never had the nerve to go out and take pictures of random people in the street. And since my main camera is a Canon 7D, It’s kinda hard to be unnoticed when that damn shutter claps away!! I mean, It’s called “Cannon” wright?!

Well, I guess there’s a first time for everything, and this was my first time shooting street action. And, let me tell you, I couldn’t be more pleased with it; both the performance from the Fuji X100T and the resulting images. Some say “Well it’s ok and everything, but ist’s no full frame!” to what I respond “Sure it’s not, but I’m not getting payed for my images (I’m not a professional photographer) ; and even if I was, an APS-C Type sensor is more than capable of producing great images.You don’t need full frame for that!”

Others gasp “It’s only 16 megapixels, wright?!”; what leads to a sligtly grumpy response from my part “Why would I need more? I don’t print mural nor building sized photos! I rarely print photos, which I regret; and when I do the biggest prints are 8×10. So I guess 16 megapixels is more than enough. Not to mention the storage space it saves me!”. Oh and don’t get me started on that whole lightroom RAW development “issue”. I know that, probably, there are other softwares that might be “better” at developing Fuj RAW files. And that if you sharpen the crap out of your images in Lightroom you might get the watercolor effect. Honestly, I didn’t notice it when I developed my pictures with this camera. Then again, I’m not looking at my files at 200%!! Just kidding, or maybe not !-)

No really; I know It’s not perfect. Although I love the X100T, I’m not blind to all it’s flaws. But like all good partnerships, It doesn’t come without it’s quirks. I’ll just have to kow, what and where they are so I can deal with them.

All in all, It’s just a fun camera to shoot. At least for me!! But enough talking, here are a few shots from my walk.

Thanks guys, and keep up the good work.

Bye for now.

João Vieira

 A father and a son, turn as they hear a helicopter flyby. The kid, of course, stares at the boats; while the father searches for the helicopter.

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 Keep in mind, this place is full of people wlaking and running. But somehow, this guy just seemed slightly off. I don’t know why but, Johnny Walker comes to mind!!

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 This lady had a very gracious walk, she could have been Grace Kelly’s long lost sister. Not that she had one!!

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Jul 152015
 

Hi Steve and Brandon! First of all thanks for the great website.

My photography journey began some 15 years ago with an old Olympus (It may have been one of OM series) that I picked up from a second-hand store. I didn’t know a lot about it back then apart from what I did or didn’t like when I saw the final print. Dabbled a bit with the chemicals but I didn’t have a ready access to a darkroom so doing it properly was difficult.
Life took over and I don’t even know what I did with the Olympus. I think I left it in a flat while I was moving.

As I became a parent and started taking pictures of my children I started to enjoy photography again, and a recent purchase of X100s opened up a whole new world – one of quality RAW files – one most of you guys are accustomed to already.

While I’m very happy with the colours straight out of X100s I am quite nostalgic of what I used to find from the old films so I tend to apply VSCO filters and try to get as close to the days when I would struggle with Kodaks and Ilfords.

Photo 1. This was taken in a shade under a harsh light and the original file was quite underexposed AND desaturated. Some time was spent on PP to find the right colour but I’m still glad that I didn’t use a flash for this. It seems that X100s is little soft at f2 (or I keep missing the focus). This is at f2.8 which to me is much easier to get a sharper image. 500s, ISO 1000
Photo 2. We were building a tent and my daughter wanted to help, so she picked up a hammer. Late afternoon light. f2, 250s, ISO200. I think I had the ND filter on.

Photo 3. On my old Olympus I often struggled to get higher contrast on my Ilfords for some reason (most likely due to my lack of knowledge on metering, exposure and light direction) and I was always envious of my friends’ shots with good contrast and deep blacks. It’s a lot easier nowadays thanks to Lightroom. Also, I use manual focus for pretty much all the time (autofocus on X100s is not terribly reliable) and I’m quite annoyed that I missed the focus on this shot of my daughter by some margin. f2, 500s, ISO400.

One day I would love to go medium format or Leica on film and do some fine art photography. As for now, there’s no money or time for that so I’ll stick to my digital and my children.

Thanks

Francis Joung

 This was taken in a shade under a harsh light and the original file was quite underexposed AND desaturated. Some time was spent on PP to find the right colour but I’m still glad that I didn’t use a flash for this. It seems that X100s is little soft at f2 (or I keep missing the focus). This is at f2.8 which to me is much easier to get a sharper image. 500s, ISO 1000

1

 We were building a tent and my daughter wanted to help, so she picked up a hammer. Late afternoon light. f2, 250s, ISO200. I think I had the ND filter on.

2

 On my old Olympus I often struggled to get higher contrast on my Ilfords for some reason (most likely due to my lack of knowledge on metering, exposure and light direction) and I was always envious of my friends’ shots with good contrast and deep blacks. It’s a lot easier nowadays thanks to Lightroom. Also, I use manual focus for pretty much all the time (autofocus on X100s is not terribly reliable) and I’m quite annoyed that I missed the focus on this shot of my daughter by some margin. f2, 500s, ISO400.

3

Jul 132015
 

Hello Brandon, Steve and Readers

I like to look at street photos. That’s why I started to try it myself. I did these streets with following cams.

The Sony RX1 is my good friend. I take it for travelling. The 1st image of the smoking guy is taken on the Azores island San Miguel. The RX 1 is small, has a silent shutter and an outstanding image quality. It’s an astonishing versatile cam. I like also its macro mode and the high contrast b/w filter. If I had to choose only one cam, I would take the RX1.

-With the Ricoh GR I have a lot of fun. I take it with me almost everywhere, working, shopping, walking with the dog. The coffee shop in the rain and the young man reading Richard Dawkins are taken in Zurich, my home town. The GR is so small, so nice to touch and so easy to use. It’s a joy. You don’t attract a lot of attention if you shoot in the streets with it. Focal length of 28 mm is perhaps a little bit wide for me. But you can set it on 35 mm.

-About a year ago I had the opportunity to buy a Leica Monochrom with a 50 mm summicron lens. I call it my soul and bitch cam. The IQ is great, sharp with 3D pop and it seems to me photos have a kind of artistic old-fashioned look. For street photography I’m often not fast enough to compose properly or I miss the focus.

Thanks for looking and your comments
Yours
Brigitte

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Jul 112015
 

Hi Brandon and Steve,

The three pictures I’ve got for you today are from a project I’ve been shooting at Oxford Violins, who are makers, dealers and restorers of fine instruments and bows.

You can see an expanded series on my site here: https://www.peterdavidgrant.com/oxford-violins/

I shoot with a Leica M-M and Sony A7s, both with 35mm lens’ attached.

Cheers, and hope you’re both having a nice day!

Peter

 Leica M Monochrom / Summicron 35mm f/2 / ISO 2500, 1/180th

Bruno Guastalla restoring a Cello

Bruno Guastalla restoring a Cello

 

 Sony A7S / FE 35mm F2.8 ZA / ISO 3200, 1/250th, F2.8

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 Sony A7S / FE 35mm F2.8 ZA / ISO 2500, 1/100th, F4

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Jul 102015
 

As a regular visitor to your inspiring site, I would like to share a special experience – an experience that left me speechless: Last month, I had the opportunity to visit a brick factory in Myanmar. Entire families make a living out of bricks. At their factory, all labour, from start to finish, is done manually. They work six days a week, no holidays. For one brick, they will get 2 Kyats. A family needs about 4000 Kyats (4 $) a day to survive. That’s at least 2000 bricks daily. I’m from Zurich, Switzerland. For me, this is unbelievable.

The ovens to burn the bricks stand in the middle of a filed, surrounded by shacks where the families live. From afar, it looks very peaceful, even romantic at night. They now have electricity, since half a year. Thanks to the lightbulbs, they can work longer.

The whole area is covered with bricks, laid out to dry. The children are building towers, rows and rows of towers, with the fresh bricks their fathers formed. After a few days in the sun, the bricks are ready for the oven.

The hardest workers, it seems, are the mothers: They carry 16-20 bricks on their heads, each brick weighing 1.5-2 kilos. At least 2000 bricks per day and woman have to be moved 50-100 meters. Women bring the bricks from the rows of towers to the oven. They wear a scarf around their head for protection. It gets very hot during the day, over 40° Celsius. There is no shade.

Boys carry the bricks up the oven. They build a new oven for every load of about 10’000 bricks. A mixture of wood and nuts is embedded, then they set fire to the oven before the whole thing gets covered in mud to keep the heat in. The bricks burn for a few days, until all the wood is turned to ashes. When uncovered, they come out all red, hard and ready to ship.

All Photos are taken with my trusted and beloved Olympus OM-D E-M5 and the Panasonic 20mm/f1.7 pancake lens.

You can find more of my street and travel photography here: www.arielleuenberger.com and www.flickr.com/arileu

Thank you very much for your passionate work!

Kind regards
Ariel Leuenberger

 

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Jul 072015
 

Hello Brandon!

Thank you for give people the opportunity to expose their works…

I am Digital Director truly passionate in photography and video making. During the weekends I become a photographer and embark on various photographic outings. I am from Rome (born and bred)… a city of a thousand faces and laden with millennia of history. Despite being one of the most photographed places on earth it still has many secrets left to discover. This is what drives my photography: revealing the locations and stories of the city that are still unknown.

I own a Sony A7MK2, I passed to Sony after years of Canon Gear.

Here some of my favourite shoots, they contains individual people above all. In all my photos I aim to have a human element. Wherever possible I try to find people with an interesting story to tell and look to recreate it via the photo.

If you want to see more you can check my works on Flickr and Instagram:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/oliver80/

http://instagram.com/oliverhl

or some movies on Vimeo:

https://vimeo.com/oliverastrologo

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Jul 052015
 

Hi,

I’m from British Columbia, Canada. These pictures were shot with a Panasonic LX7. Most of these should have EXIF data preserved. Born in Malaysia, my father gave me my first camera as a child. It was a Kodak 110. I graduated to an Olympus Trip 35 rangefinder, then a Canon AE1-Program. Next came a Minolta X-700 with a full set of lenses, then an Olympus IS-1. These days I shoot with a Panasonic LX7 and a Nikon P600 mainly.

Most of the cameras from the major brands are capable of fine, fine work these days.

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Jul 022015
 

Hi Steve, hi Brandon

Firstly let me introduce my self, I’m Adhika, from Jakarta, Indonesia

I’ve been a photography addict since 4 years ago, I don’t have a lot of money, so I never bought a camera more than $1000..now I have a fuji s5 pro dslr and recently bought a Pentax q10 with a kit zoom 5-15mm f2.8-4.5 for only $200 brand new..

The pictures below is a try out for Pentax Q10, the autofocus is slow, and the screen is hideous in bright light..but strangely the files that it pumped is very easy to manipulate in lightroom, the highlight is a breeze to recover..

The first picture was edited with LR5, I recover the highlight slightly, open up the shadow a bit and add the saturation. It was shot at 5mm f.5.0 iso 200 1/1000s

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The second picture was edited in silver fx pro, shot at 5mm, f3.5 iso 100 1/500s

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The last pictures of Torina the horse also edited in silver fx pro, shot at 10.9mm f4.0 iso 100 1/125s

That’s it..hope you enjoy it..greeting from Indonesia

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Jul 012015
 

Hi Steve and Brandon,

I recently visited Melbourne — where it isn’t as warm as my home town, Brisbane. (It really shouldn’t bother me as I’m originally from Chicago.)

I was talking with the used-book seller (the man in the brown cap) at the Camberwell Markets, when it began to rain. He only sells quality books. I bought “Fear and loathing in America,” the papers of Hunter Thompson.

All the sellers at the market put up plastic sheets and many retreated into their cars. But despite the showers there was quite a bit of light. All three of these shots were with the Loxia 50mm.

While there are a  few “market pictures” on my blog (www.billdanby.com), I’m not really a market person. I get taken to these things.

I hope you like them.

Regards,

Bill

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