Dec 192014
 

Friday Film: the Mamiya 645 Pro + various lenses and films

by fiftyasa

Browsing your excellent blog, I could find only one post about the Mamiya 645 and I thought to send a second one. And here it is! (I will keep it short and let the picture speak)

My configuration of the Mamiya 645 Pro with prism and winding crank, here with the Sekor 80mm f/2.8 (picture taken with Nikon FM2 50mm f/1.4, drug store 200 ASA film, scanned at home)

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Some impressions about the camera:

  • The Mamiya 645 is bulky – of course, it is a medium format camera! without lens it’s about 1,300g, similar to a Nikon D4.
  • It looks made of plastic, it feels made of plastic and it is made of plastic! But it doesn’t feel cheap at all! It is robust and well assembled, despite the fact that it has many removable parts (magazine, prism, winding crank and lens). Of course holding a Hasselblad 500 cm or a Rolleiflex 2.8f is something different, but with the Mamiya I don’t have the feeling that I am going around with a very expensive and rare antique. You might attract some attention due to the size of the camera, but that’s about it. No need to tape the brand or hide your camera for fear of being robbed
  • Also because a used Mamiya 645 Pro can be found very cheap! Mine was in mint conditions with 80mm f/2.8 for less than 300 EUR. The ProTL costs more, the 645 (no Pro) less.
  • The prism is stellar! Really big and with info of the shutter speed. Mine has exposure compensation and a wheel to select average metering, spot metering or auto. And the auto works: it recognizes when I shoot into the sun and correct exposure accordingly
  • The prism also has split prism and microprism ring to assist focusing. Nevertheless my focusing hit rate with fast apertures is not 100%. I always have a few shots which are out of focus. But the same happens to me with the Hasselblad 500 cm (which does not have split prism). Comparing the focusing experience with the rangefinder cameras, I find the latter easier to focus (I use Leica M6 and Zeiss Ikon ZM)
  • Of course you have to forget about a quiet shutter (if that is what you want, go with a Rolleiflex)

Lenses:

  • The Sekor 80mm f2.8 N is great! Small and relatively lightweight, it is in my opinion a super general-purpose lens!

Sekor 80mm f/2.8, Kodak Porta 400, standard lab scan with Fuji Frontier

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Sekor 80mm f/2.8, Kodak Porta 400, standard lab scan with Fuji Frontier (the bokeh here looks like an oil painting)

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Sekor 80mm f/2.8, Fuji 400H, professional lab scan with Fuji Frontier

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Sekor 80mm f/2.8, Kodak Portra 160, professional lab scan with Fuji Frontier

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Sekor 80mm f/2.8, Kodak Ektar 100, professional lab scan with Fuji Frontier (the 3 pictures below show the typical rendering of the Frontier when scanning Ektar: bold, vivid and saturated colors)

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Sekor 80mm f/2.8, Kodak Ektar 100, professional lab scan with Fuji Frontier

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Sekor 80mm f/2.8, Kodak Ektar 100, professional lab scan with Fuji Frontier

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I also have an 80mm f/1.9 N, maybe the fastest lens in the 6×4,5 world. This lens is heavy and I am not impressed by its rendering mainly because I see no character. Maybe it’s just me, but I see more 3D pop in the Contax 645 + Zeiss f/2 or even in the Rolleiflex 2.8f. I don’t own these 2 cameras and my comments are based on pictures from others, so I appreciate your opinions on this. Here you see examples. Open for comments.

Sekor 80mm f/1.9 (more or less at f/4), Kodak Ektar 100, professional lab scan with Fuji Frontier (long exposure would require the special shutter release cable that I don’t have…)

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Sekor 80mm f/1.9 (I guess wide open), Fuji 400H, professional lab scan with Fuji Frontier

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Sekor 80mm f/1.9 (I guess wide open), Fuji 400H, professional lab scan with Fuji Frontier

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I also use a 110m f/2.8 (non-N). This lens is not made of plastic like the modern N lenses. My only complaint here is that you have to keep on turning the focus ring for a while to go from minimum distance to infinite. I wonder why Mamiya made such a long focus range, also because it’s hard to see any difference in focus when you turn the ring only a few degree..

Sekor 110mm f/2.8, Fuji 400H, professional lab scan with Fuji Frontier

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Sekor 110mm f/2.8, Fuji 400H, professional lab scan with Fuji Frontier

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Sekor 110mm f/2.8, Kodak Portra 400, professional lab scan with Fuji Frontier (some flare visible on the black shirt)

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Further pictures on my website: http://fiftyasa.wordpress.com

Comments are of course welcome!

Dec 192014
 

The Linhof Technikardan 69 and Schneider Super-Angulon 65mm f/5.6

By Dirk Dom

Hi, everyone!

About half a year ago I decided to go into serious black and white landscape. First I wanted to buy a Sony A7R, with a Canon 17mm tilt-shift lens. That would have cost me some 6,000 Euro’s. But my love for black and white film (You can’t emulate grain) and mechanical camera’s made me change my mind and I bought a Linhof Technikardan 6×9, which shoots 6×9 on rollfilm.

I had a 150mm lens (equivalent to a 60mm on 35mm) and I proceeded to shoot this camera.

It was a disappointing experience. I put the camera on my big tripod and with that combination on my shoulder I walked around. After an hour I was in pain and I was exhausted. Setting up tripod with the camera on it was very difficult.

Then, last month, I got the idea of putting camera and everything in a Lowepro backpack and walk around with backpack, and tripod in hand, and setting up, getting everything out of the backpack, shooting, and putting everything back into the backpack. This worked, now I didn’t get tired anymore and could really shoot with this camera.

I’m working on a project: shooting San Francisco. Two years ago I spent six weeks there with my Olympus PEN and FD lenses, I’m going back for two weeks with Easter to shoot Spring there, and next summer I’m going back for another six weeks. Now that I had the logistics of the Linhof figured out, I want to spend the summer six weeks in San Francisco shooting black and white with it.

I want to shoot with four lenses (on a walk I always carry one lens), a 47mm (eq. to 19mm), a 65 (eq. to 26mm), my 150mm, and a 300, eq. to 120mm.

Today my 65mm arrived.

This is it

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On the camera it is like this

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I went to the forest to shoot it. There was a lot of traffic and I only got there at 3PM, so there wasn’t much light anymore. I had left my spotmeter on, and the battery was dead, I had to guess the light. The negs came out good.

Here’s my first shots with the 65mm: At last a wide angle on this camera!

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Here I used tilt to get more DOF, but I overdid it. With the wide lens the edges of the image on the ground glass are very dark, and there was only little light. The top of the trees is unsharp. Focusing with this lens must be real accurate, much more than with the 150mm.

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And here I did some serious burning in Photoshop.

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I scan the negs on an Epson 750 flatbed at 2,400PPI, this gives me enough for an enlargement of 2 ft 4 inches at 300DPI.

Everything you read on the Net about these camera’s slowing you down is true. Shooting with the Linhof is a unique experience, not in the least to work with a piece of fine mechanics. I know that image quality wise, the Leica M240 or the Sony A7R are better than this camera, but I’m glad I decided for the Linhof.

Bye,
Dirk.

 

Dec 172014
 

Rediscovering Old Friends Part 2 – With film

By John Tuckey

Hi Brandon

In my recent post about rediscovering the ‘Lux 50 I mentioned that there was film in the lab and that I’d send in a  film post when it was back… well, here you go. I’ve picked out a handful that directly correlate to the digital shots in the last post for those who still haven’t had enough of the film vs digital debate ;-)

For those who missed the first post here’s the digital shots http://www.stevehuffphoto.com/2014/12/05/rediscovering-an-old-friend-the-lux50-asph-by-john-tuckey/

These have all had the same tweak to contrast and black level as they came into lightroom but are otherwise edit free beyond cropping. Hope you enjoy them!

M2, ‘Cron 90, Ilford Delta 400

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M2, ‘Cron 90, Ilford Delta 400

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MP, ‘Lux 50, Ilford HP5+

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Lux 50, Ilford Delta 400

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ux 50, Ilford Delta 3200

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Lux 50, Ilford Delta 3200

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Best regards

John Tuckey

Dec 092014
 

An exotic modern classic, the Rolleiflex FX-N

By Brett Price

Hello Steve/Brandon,

Its been a while since I’ve submitted anything for your site, I thought it was long overdue. I recently purchased what I believe to be my dream medium format camera, a Rolleiflex FX-N and I thought I would share some photos and experiences with it since owning it for the month or so I’ve had it.

Rolleiflex FX-N

Before owning this camera my primary medium format camera was a Hasselblad 501cm which I loved but often felt as though it was the wrong type of camera for my style of shooting. It’s an excellent system, but focusing can be slow and if you use a prism of any kind it becomes rather large and cumbersome. I had a kit with a few lenses, a few backs, a waist level finder and a prism but often felt like I really only shot it with the 80mm and carried one back 99% of the time. I also rather hate the need for extension tubes to get closer than 1m which can feel somewhat limiting for someone who primarily takes portraits.

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The FX-N is my perfect medium format camera because it solved most of my issues with shooting with the Hasselblad in one camera that didn’t have any negatives to me. It’s extremely small, not really needed more space than a Leica with a lens when put in a bag. It has a fast 80mm f2.8 lens, perfect for portraits. It’s quick to focus, moving from min focus to infinity is extremely easy and fast, the Hasselblad often would take 2-3 full slow turns to do that. It uses a leaf shutter, something I’ve grown accustomed to and is nice when working with flash or low shutter speed, It’s insanely quiet, almost inaudible and has no mirror slap so it can be handheld at low speeds easily. It has a built in meter, something the Hasselblad required an electronic prism for. But the main reason I sprang for it was its close focus ability, allowing me to get up to 55cm away from a subject without the need for an extension tube or magnifying filter. I hate carrying these things around, and I often feel like the sweet spot for portraits was just under the 1 meter that most cameras allow.

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So now this camera comes with me everywhere I go, easily. It doesn’t sacrifice anything I find to be important in a system and will shoot the way I want it for 99 percent of anything I typically throw at it and I’ve been hugely enjoying it thus far.

I actually thought twice about writing this short review for a camera that most people would never buy. Dropping the amount that this camera cost is not something that anyone would take lightly but when I considered the long-term usage over the course of a lifetime and the problems it has solved for me in finding an all round system that I like, it seemed like a reasonable amount. I also loved the ability to support one of the last companies still producing film cameras. I sold a bunch of gear to help pay for it, and part of it was a wedding gift from my now wife. It came in just in time for my recent wedding, which was the first day I used it for. It’ll always have a place in documenting our lives together.

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I think one of the things our generation forgets is that a camera used to last you a lifetime. It used to be something you would pass along through generations. I’m not knocking on digital cameras but that is certainly one quality I miss in modern cameras that digital will probably never be able to offer us again. I hope you like the photos I’ve shot with it thus far.

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I have more posted on my tumblr here:
brettprice.tumblr.com

Or on instagram here:
@brettwayneprice

I try to post at least a photo a day to those places if you’d like to see more.

Cheers,
Brett

Nov 122014
 

A Dedication to Chris Brunkhart

By Alex Bacon

Thank you Steve Huff for allowing me the opportunity to write about my friend, Chris Brunkhart. Chris is an amazing and influential lifestyle/snowboard photographer who was just recently diagnosed with Stage 4 colon and liver cancer.

Many of you who visit this website daily may not recognize Chris’s name but you may recognize his iconic photography. Chris’s images have documented the world of snowboarding in Snowboarder, Transworld Snowboarding and Frequency
magazines—to name a few. His editorial work in the 1990’s was often described as having a dark atmospheric quality, that gave as much attention to ethereal, snowy landscapes as it did to the athlete he was photographing.

I can truly say, that it isn’t just shooting the best athletes, over six continents that makes Chris tick. It’s the freedom of self-expression and the process of creating and capturing life’s fleeting moments which fuels his creative fire. His photography evokes emotion on such a deep level. You don’t just “see” what’s happening in the frame, you feel it…you’re in it, experiencing that moment physically, and I can’t think of a more apt compliment for any photographer. Chris’s creative vision and unique photographic style has influenced many young action-sports photographers over the years. Seeing Chris work first hand, applying his gift of capturing that moment in time is what drove me to pick up my first camera and pursue photography as a passion, I thank him for that gift every day!

For the past year, Chris has been living in Brooklyn, NYC where he has been shooting landscape photography and field portraiture, as well as dabbling in mixed media sculpture, woodworking, and continued contributions to underground film and video projects.

Upon his diagnosis in September, Chris returned to his home city of Portland, Oregon so he could be close to his friends and family during his treatment. Chis has recently begun his treatment of Chemotherapy and has started to fight against the cancer which is threatening his life.

There are two benefits being held to help raise funds for his ongoing treatment and everyone reading this is welcome to attend. The first will be on November 14, at NEMO Design in Portland, Oregon, and the second will be on November 20, at The Boathouse Collective, in Costa Mesa, California. A GoFundMe page for financial donations has also been set up at www.gofundme.com/chrisbrunkhart.

Image caption guide:

Meeting the heli, Juneau Ice Field, Alaska

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 Yakutat backcountry, Alaska

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Matt Donahue, Mountain pass near Briancon, Italy

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Craig Kelly, warming hut, Revelstoke, BC

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Devon Walsh, Mt. Hood, OR

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Dan Peterka, Stepping off into the Vltava river, Prague, CZ

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No Tennis. Creston Park, Portland, OR

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A woman waits on a cold winter day, Prague CZ

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Jamie Lynn, about midnight in Seattle, WA

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On his way to work. London, UK

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Silhoetted by the clouds. Craig Kelly, near Pucon, Chile

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Nov 072014
 

Halloween at the Hellfire Club

by Ibraar Hussain

Dear Steve, Brandon and all www.stevehuffphoto.com lovers!

A quick one, seeing as Halloween just passed, I thought it would be apt for me to submit some photos for the time of year.

I went to The Hellfire Caves at West Wycombe at this time of year, on a dreary dark Halloween, followed by a trip to West kennet Long Barrow and Avebury in Wiltshire, an area with a long tradition of things Pagan and ancient.

West Wycombe is worth visiting, and the area around the Dashwood Mausoleum can be very creepy at night, even during the day there is something other worldly and eerie about the place. The Hellfire Caves were a meeting place for the Hellfire Club since the 18th century, and one Benjamin Franklin was also a member!

All worth visiting, and enjoying and great places for photography!

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hellfire_Club

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Wycombe

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avebury

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Kennet_Long_Barrow

I was armed that wet day with a Minolta Dynax/Maxxum 5 35mm SLR with a slow kit lens and used the flash inside the caves. It is small and light with a very fast AF – and takes all Dynax/Maxxum/Alpha lenses. It was loaded with a roll of Ilford HP5 and I had it developed at a Lab so all basic and low-fi.

Sunlight at West Wycombe Hill, Buckinghamshire

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Wiltshire from West Kennet.

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Girl at The Hellfire Club, West Wycombe, Buckinghamshire

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Wiltshire from West Kennet.

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The Dashwood Mausoleum, West Wycombe, Buckinghamshire.

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In The Hellfire Caves, West Wycombe, Buckinghamshire

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West Wycombe Park and House, from West Wycombe Hill, Buckinghamshire

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At The Hellfire Club, West Wycombe Hill, Buckinghamshire

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Oct 292014
 

The Winterless North and the Leica Film M’s

By Jason Howe

Much earlier in the year I had some surgery on my knee, I can tell you there is plenty of time to think when you spend weeks sat around on the sofa watching daytime tv!! During these weeks of boredom I figured out a few things I needed and wanted to do once I was back on my feet.

Firstly I created my own little photography space, part darkroom and part office, this has been a huge advantage, no more migrating from room to room around the house. Secondly, I really wanted to get back to basics and shoot more film, not only did I want to shoot more film, I also wanted to take more ownership of the whole process. I got lucky and managed to pick up a relatively unused Jobo CPP2 with lift, an achievement in itself here in NZ. The tanks and reels I picked up from the helpful and equally awesome guys at Catlabs.

I few weeks ago I managed to fabricate another road-trip opportunity and with it a chance to visit another part of New Zealand, one that I haven’t explored before. As a continuation of my enthusiasm for shooting film I’d maybe crack out a Leica film camera or two for the trip.

Route -
Head to Cape Reinga at the extreme tip of the North Island, taking in a few other random places on the way. Experience has taught me to have a plan to fall back on but to follow my nose most of the time……

Gear -

Leica M7 & Leica M3 DS
35mm Summilux f/1.4 Asph
50mm Summilux f/1.4 Asph
15mm Voigtlander Super Wide Heliar f/4.5 Asph

I have now mastered the art of travelling light, well lighter when it comes to gear.

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I grabbed a random handful of films, well 24 rolls to be exact, safe in the knowledge that there’s absolutely no way I’d be able to shoot that many rolls in a few days but I did manage 12 which for me, is quite a lot.

Kodak Ektar 100
Kodak Portra 400
Agfa Vista 200
Fuji Superior 400
Fuji Velvia 50
Fuji Astia 100f
TMAX 100
TRI X 400

Developing -
I’ve developed the C41 films myself in the JOBO CPP2 using the same Digibase C41 Pre-mixed kit I’ve used recently. Likewise I’ve also developed the B&W, this time using XTOL. I’ve not got my E6 Chemicals yet so these were kindly developed by the awesome Film Soup.

Scanning -
Again, I’ve done this myself, I’m certainly still getting to grips with my current scanner.

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There are no such things as strangers, only friends we haven’t met yet!! I don’t know where that saying originated but I can’t help but think it was based on someones experiences in New Zealand!!! People, especially in small towns are more likely to engage in conversation with a stranger, put a film camera in the strangers hand and they are more likely still!! Throw in an English accent and well you can pretty much speak to anyone, anywhere……..

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I’m trying to be more present in the moment, less rushing around chasing photographs and more relaxing and just accepting what comes along. Obviously I huge part of photography is creating memories, not all images can be beautiful, nor should they be, I’ve included the image below to highlight that.

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Whilst undoubtably slowing progress my continued inclination to drive down random side roads does yield the occasion benefit. I followed one such road for several kilometers until it eventually ended at a deserted white sand beach, deserted that is apart from a small campervan. You see these vans in NZ, half a million km’s on the clock, no doubt carried endless numbers of travelers around the island before eventually being sold on and on and on. It appeared to be empty but as I began to walk away from it a voice yelled out “Kia Ora Bro!” as I turned a face popped up in the rear window. Five minutes later and I was sat at a makeshift table and chairs sharing a cup of tea with this generous stranger. The kiwi’s call it having a yarn and as we sat putting the world to rights, sipping tea and discussing the beauty of the “winterless north” he made an admission…… “The truth is I was only hitting the road for a few weeks, in actual fact I was supposed to be back at work by now, well 2 months ago to be honest!!!” We cracked up, New Zealand can do this to you, “S**t! I need to do a lot better than you” I said.

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For me, there’s always a period of reflection when you return from a trip. With the exception of the E6 processing, the dune and cloud shot, this entire analog post is my own work from start to finish. When you actually stop and think about the process it’s actually a little bit daunting, that said it’s also incredibly satisfying. Breaking it down, from seeing a photograph, executing the shot, developing the film and getting a scan you’re happy with there’s actually quite a lot of margin for error…..Had I shot these images on digital I’d have known immediately if I’d got the shot, there’s no risk to processing them and they could have been posted within a couple of days, don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying that’s a negative in fact most of the time that suits! Nor am I saying these are the best photographs I’ve ever taken, but I’m going to stick my neck out and say that right now they are the ones that have given me the most satisfaction.

This is just a small extract of my trip, the entire post including processing details can be seen on my website HERE.

Cheers, Jason.

Oct 242014
 

Bicycling to Spain, an account with Hasselblad Xpan shots

By Dirk Dom

This is the Hasselblad Xpan, sorry, it’s a bit dirty

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Today I looked again at the Xpan shots I took on my bicycle ride from Antwerp to Spain from two years ago, not that I ever got there.

The reason I looked was that I shot Kodak Ektar on that trip and Matthias, my Australian friend, has discovered Ektar and he told me this film was so special. Two years ago I wasn’t very experienced with shooting digital and I had forgotten how Ektar looked. Well, it looks different. I like it.

Looking back at the eighty shots I took then, the film indeed captured very nicely, I think you couldn’t emulate these with digital.

The Xpan is an extraordinary camera, it’s the most fun camera I have, as much fun as my digital Olympus PEN. It shoots 24 x 65 mm panorama’s on 35mm film. I have the 45mm lens, which is about equivalent to 24mm on full frame.

Well, here goes:

I left home, fifth of July, at about 8.30. my friend Hugo had called me half an hour before to wish me all the best. The secret for such a trip is not to think about the 2,500 kms ahead, but be relaxed and just start. Ten minutes into the trip a woman on a bicycle pulled up to me: “What an nice Koga!” And I told her I was on my way to Spain. It was the first of countless contacts which made the trip so worthwhile.

Namur, the river Meuse, start of the Ardennes.

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I did between eighty and a hundred kilometers a day, three days riding and one day of rest. The days of rest were boring, I’ll not do that again on my next trip.

The very big advantage is that you can stop anywhere, any time and you have NO parking problems. The Xpan was in a 8mm thick neoprene sleeve which I had cut out of an old diving suit, in a box on the handlebar. I had forty Ektar films with me, 20 shots to a film. During the trip I shot 19 films, so that was more than plenty.

Poppies. Didn’t look through the viewfinder for this. Meuse valley.

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This was my first ever field of poppies, just entered into France. I had this shot scanned at 8,000PPI on a Hasselblad Imacon, that was 150 megapixel. It just resolved the grain, but the shot was’t sharp enough to go for enlargement beyond 1.5 meters. That’s the limit you run into when you shoot handheld.

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My Koga. I had 29 kilograms of luggage with me. That was ridiculous. Next time I’ll take twelve kilo’s max. I had a pair of wirecutter pliers with me which weighed over a kilo to cut the cable to the brakes should I replace it! Imagine! Stupid. The weight made me walk uphill a lot but I didn’t mind.

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Of course I took some artisty shots, too:

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I had driven through France by car countless times, on the highway. I had always longed to stop at a sunflower field and shoot it extensively. That was not possible. Now, I could take my time.

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Here, I just left my bike and walked into the field for half an hour until the composition was to my liking:

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A ray of sun on these geraniums, I postprocessed this image.

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Biking, the most beautiful thing is perhaps the ever changing skies.

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I didn’t make it to Spain; my 29 kilograms of luggage got the better of me in the Massif Central. Also, I was insufficiently trained to do the Cols in Spain. So I stopped near Avignon. It was marvelous.

Next summer I’m bicycling from Antwerp to Santiago de Compostella, 3,000 kms in six weeks. I’m taking the Xpan with me again.

Bye,

Dirk.

Oct 232014
 

Some Contax G2 love

By Ibraar Hussain

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Hi Steve, Brandon and stevehuffphoto.com lovers!

Thought I’d reignite the site with some Contax G love.

The G2 has been written about many many times, here and elsewhere so should need no introduction, but with the Leica fetish around I think it’s high time the G2 reared it’s head again encouraging people to try it out and spoil the Leica party!
It was and still is the most advanced RF camera with lightning fast AF (some people find the AF on the 90 Sonnar a bit hit n miss though – no such problems here!).

I am surprised no one has copied it yet, and I am very surprised that Kyocera Japan who own the rights to the Contax name and the G2 haven’t released a Dighital G which would, judging by the Fuji X100 love and the other retro styled cameras, especially of the RF style, would be a huge hit!

The G2 is a proper RF, not a wannabe – and is almost near perfect, my only complaint is the relatively smallish (yet bright ) VF – I say relatively, as on it’s own it is large and bright enough, but compared to a Leica  it isn’t, and no reason why Kyocera couldn’t have made the G2 VF the same size as the huge and bright one of their Contax T2!

Now Kyocera, please make a Digital G and revive this masterpiece!

I’ve had mine for 10 years now and I would never choose anything else of any type over it!

Here’s a selection of B&W photos taken with fast Film – Ilford ~Delta 3200, Fuji Neopan 1600 and Kodak Tmax 3200 with the Contax G2, of a street style – My street style which I suppose isn’t very refined and which includes some street portraits and cityscapes in Constantinople when it snowed.
All pretty high key, contrasty – not to every one’s taste.

All shots taken with a Contax G2 45mm Planar, 21mm Biogon and BW Yellow Filter.

See some of Ibraar’s other posts HERE. 

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Oct 142014
 

Fuji GX 617 panoramic camera

by Dirk Dom

Hi, all!

I want to share some shots made with my Fuji GX617 panoramic camera.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This monster, pictured here next to a Minox, yields 6 x 17 centimeter slides or negatives on 120 film, 4 images on a roll which you can blow up to insane dimensions. It all started in my photo club, where someone showed 1 meter big prints from Schotland. These landscapes were so incredibly detailed and rich they totally overwhelmed me, they hit me like lightning. They were taken with a Linhof 6×17 panoramic camera.

I wanted to do this, too, and started researching panoramic photography. The price of the 6×17 camera’s was so high, however, that I couldn’t possible buy one. The, in a local photo shop, this Fuji for sale. With a 90mm (90° image angle) and an 180mm (45° image angle) A search on the Net confirmed that this, with its interchangeable lenses and good viewfinder, was probably the best 6×17 camera. The price was good, too, 5,000 Euro’s! Impossible. Every time I drove by there, that camera sat there, just to annoy me. I had it taken out one more time, what a piece! In the end I couldn’t bear it anymore and I took out a bank loan.

In the photo club they had told me that finding compositions in the 1 by 3 aspect ratio was extremely difficult. I didn’t dare shoot the camera. After three months of hesitation I decided it was enough and I took it for a spin. All worked fine. That day the lid was off the pot, I shot all day, went to four locations. Then the moment of truth: got my slides back.I can tell you that absolutely nothing matches the impact of a sparkling 6×17 Velvia slide on the light table. The detail was insane. I can tell you I was hooked, then.

The 1×3 aspect ratio came very natural to me and soon I began to shoot worthwhile images. I ran into another limit: The images screamed for really big printing, at least two meters, and such a print, mounted, cost about 400 Euro’s. I got a few made, which were overwhelming, but when I tried to sell them, no one wanted them. First of all, the price (everyone buys posters at the IKEA for 6 Euro’s) and second, no one could hang such a monster print. I could hang one in my small home.

So, there I was, totally frustrated, with 60 mind-blowing images I couldn’t do anything with. Should I sell the camera? I decided on a moratorium of a year.

I found out after a year that I don’t need 2 meter big prints to enjoy the camera. Half meter images also show that there’s something different going on from your regular DSLR images. The detail and colors are much richer. So I started shooting the camera again. Technically, the camera is extremely basic: distance (no rangefinder), speed, opening, transport. It requires very strict discipline to shoot it. That make it a very enjoyable experience, because you’re in total control. The lenses are very, very sharp.

Well, enough talk, let’s see some images! All shots are from Antwerp, Belgium.

This is Antwerp, with the cruise ship Europa in front of it. I read in a local magazine it ‘d be in town for just one day and I went out to shoot it. The original slide is just not sharp enough to read the licence plates of the cars parked. Because the 2 minutes exposure you see no people. At 1PM the boat’s horn went off and a firework started. I had crossed a perimeter to do my shot, and a continuous rain of firework debris fell on me. I was afraid for my lens. I was too close to the firework to make decent images.

boot afgewerkt klein

That you make one image, complete, at exposure, is vastly advantageous to stitching in a DSLR. You can take action shots. One of my panorama’s is a flock of pigeons passing over at close distance.
This image I stood on the road, waited for a car coming to me, another coming from behind and exposed for 30 seconds.

Pano Gent.fff 001

This is the image of the fireworks of the inauguration of the MAS (Museum Aan de Stroom, museum at the river) I was at the other bank of the river, used the 180mm; To my amazement I was the only one there, which makes this shot unique.

vuurwerk afgewerkt lage res

I had set up, needing 2 minutes’ worth of exposure.

While exposing, a flash went off. A guy with a point and shoot. My exposure was ruined. I waited until he was gone and started over. Another flash. The guy had come back! Started over again, a third flash. The guy had come back again. I explained that he ruined my exposures and asked him to not to flash anymore. Without a word he turned away.

lange wapper afgewerkt klein

The petrochemical industry downtown. On the slide, you clearly see a crane cable two kilometers away.

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The Antwerp cathedral. To make this shot, I went downtown five or six times to get the clear sky. Then I waited until the light was all balanced.

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This is a shot hyperfocally set. The cathedral tower could be a little sharper because of it, but still you see the cement bonding the stones together at the top.

toren met put afgewerkt klein

Bye,

Dirk.

Oct 102014
 

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1959 Rolleiflex 2.8E – Shooting family, friends, fashion and famous!

By Andy Jackson

Hi Steve,

Thanks for all your great dedication to your site bringing us all sorts of articles, new gear, digital or film and your never-ending enthusiasm! So, about four years ago you published a Daily Inspiration from myself, shots from my Leica CL. The images were mainly of my son, who was about 2 years old at the time. After reading your write up on the Rolleiflex Hy6 (which to be honest, I didn’t even know existed!) I thought I could do a User Report on my 1959 Rolleiflex 2.8E.

My friend Ludi – this was shot on Rollei Retro 400.

Ludi 02 - Rolleiflex

I’d shot film/transparency for a long time as a photographer working on a snowboard magazine and acquiring the Leica kind of reignited the idea of shooting analogue again. This time I was more interested in shooting black and white and was partly inspired by another article on your site by Max Marinucci about home processing. My late Uncle also had an influence on me from an early age, with his camera in hand, his slides and his black and white prints of me as a kid. I’d done darkroom work at my first job many moons ago at a design company in London, so I knew how it went, but had never done it at home. Having bought the necessary bit and pieces and some chemicals (totaling €80!) I started to develop the negatives from the Leica. Yup, the same grin factor as getting my transparencies back after a snowboard shoot but with the extra satisfaction of doing it myself! Now, I’m not even going to go into the practicalities or convenience factors of digital over film, as to be honest, as you said in your article “Analog is a different beast than digital in almost every way.” If I’m processing film or going through a digital shoot on the computer I like to get ‘in the zone’ – cup of tea and some decent tunes on the stereo and off I go!

Branko from Croatia, I used the Rolleinar close-up lens for this.

Branko - Rolleiflex

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My good friend Doris, a yoga teacher. We’d been for a hike on the mountain and I had the 2.8E in my bag along with a Hassy 500cm, this is from the Rolleiflex.

Doris yoga 02 - Rolleiflex

So on to the Rolleiflex! After searching around on Fleabay and websites and doing some homework I realized I was going to have to spend a decent amount of money for a good one. At the same time I bumped into a friend here in Innsbruck who’d seen some of my film shots online. He told me his mum used to be a professional photographer and that she had a few old cameras left from her working days. I asked if any had two lenses on the front, he said he seemed to remember playing with something like that when he was a kid and he’d ask his mum. Two days later he calls me and tells me she still has her old Rolleiflex. He gives me the serial number and I track it down to a 1959 2.8E. Oh yes, the Carl Zeiss Planar. He’d been online and checked out the prices, not cheap really, a good one is at least €1000. He offers to sell it to me for €250 – I can hardly contain my excitement. So, off I go to meet his mother, she’s actually thrilled to be able to sell it to someone who’s actually going to use it, it’s been doing nothing for about 40 years. As you can see from the shot, it’s in pretty good shape. I sent it in for CLA to a company in Salzburg, it needed some work, lightmeter was replaced and some bits in the shutter – €400, so in the end I still have a sweet deal and the camera stays in the area.

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Preparation and handling.

The Rolleiflex is not a heavy camera. It fits nicely into my Lowepro Event Messenger 150 bag, leaving enough room for the Leica or my FM2 or OM2, lightmeter and film in the front pocket. I’ve replaced the old leather strap with a modern one, this puppy is not gonna end up on the floor. Once you get used to it, it’s a quick camera to pull out and start to shoot with. Take a light reading, set aperture and shutter speed, flip the lid and focus. So, we have aperture from 2.8 – 22 with half stops marked. Shutter runs from 1 sec 1/500th plus B. Loading film isn’t too tricky, just remember to put the paper through the bottom rollers then close the back and start winding on with the lever. There’s a mechanism that ‘senses’ when the film goes through these rollers and then the exposure window starts to register, wind on and it will stop on the first frame. Ready to rock. I’ve also acquired a Rolleinar 1 close-up lens for it, these are rare as rocking horse pooh because of the Bayonet 3 mount and some people ask silly money for them – I paid £120 for mine, I’ve seen ‘em go for a lot more.
Looking through the viewfinder you realize everything is in reverse, this takes a bit of getting used to, especially trying to keep things level. We get twelve shots and twelve shots only, so patience and practice will pay off!

I shoot the odd landscape. Dolomites, Italy.

Dolomites - Rolleiflex

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Francois, from, er, France. My friend was looking after his Indian motorcycle that broke down on a run here in England. He came back to pick it up. How could I not shoot this portrait.

Francois - Rolleiflex

Shooting family and friends and others.

I use this camera a lot for shooting images of my son. Sure, I could use my 7D and autofocus as he runs about (and I do) but over the last few years he has learnt that when daddy points the two eyed black box thing at him, he must stay still! It’s not about getting the right camera for the child but training the child for the camera ;-) Sometimes he’s not in the mood for stillness, so I leave it for a bit. Using a TLR at the right time though, I think is the secret. When he’s focused in on something or climbing a tree, I just ask him to stop and look up. Nine times out of ten he does. Candid racing about shots are best suited to newer technology, what I want from my Rolleiflex is the more thoughtful images, maybe even posed, if you can call it that. I prefer to look at it as shots where I have his attention, where we have our connection. Having the twelve shots makes me choosy about when I hit that shutter, I really have to be sure it’s what I want. I usually take one shot of a ‘scene’ and leave it at that then move on. Sometimes I don’t even move on, a roll can sit in the camera for days or a week or two. There’s no rush with this camera, no incessant need to snap everything in sight, it’s way more about gathering some great memories for me, of my little man growing up.

Rolleicord. My son Noah on a rainy afternoon.

Noah - Rolleicord

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If any one photo sums up why I love this camera, it’s this one. I took one shot of this scene, kept my fingers crossed that I’d nailed the focus and kept the camera steady, 1/30th of a second.

Noah bamboo - Rolleiflex

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Zeiss Ikon Nettar. This camera is small when folded, very small for 6×6. Beautiful results.

Noah field - Zeiss Ikonta

Shooting friends is a little easier, they know how to sit still. The Rolleiflex instills a sense of wonder in everyone. I get the usual question – “Do they still make film for that” and the remarks about how beautiful it is. I’ve used it a lot at weddings, it’s a talking point for guests, certainly breaks the ice. Bride and Groom are always super stoked on receiving a set of hand printed images, the Rolleiflex shots are the highlight without a doubt. I’ve noticed people feel way less intimidated with the Rollei than they are with a DSLR.

Like the Leica, the Roleiflex has it’s own brand of magic dust it sprinkles on your images. The awesome depth of field, that ‘otherworldly days gone by’ vibe where your natural light shots look like from another era, which in a sense they are! 6×6 analogue is affordable for nearly all of us, whereas digging into our pocket-money for a digi Hasselblad or Leica S2 isn’t such a do-able proposition (well not for me at least!) I love the 2.8E, I love to photograph people with it, I love the results and I love the fact that I have a fixed lens (with option of close-up). It takes 25 minutes to develop a roll of film, then about half hour to hang up and dry. Scanning is painless on my Canon flatbed 9000f and results are ok – it’s no Nikon Coolscan but I get 50cm by 50cm scans out of it. My favourite shots I print in my darkbathroom ;-) but that’s another story.

Stephen Bartels, gallery owner of the same name, London.

Stephen Bartels - Rolleiflex

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Sir David Rodiagn, MBE (left) and his agent Ricky McKay (right). David is a living legend Reggae DJ, radio DJ (BBC), famous throughout the world. Ricky presented him with a 50cm x 50cm framed print of this shot for his 60th birthday. Proud moment indeed.

Rodigan and Ricky 16bit

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Terje Haakonsen, one of the world’s most famous snowboarders. This is part of a series I made of Snowboard Legends in 2013 and was published in a couple of magazines. This is one of my few flashed shots with the Rollei.

Terje Haakensen - Rolleiflx

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Tomi Toiminnen, ex pro snowbaorder, shwoing his tattoos ‘Never Forget’ one for an old friend of his who died too young, the other for a friend of ours who lost his life in an avalanche.

Tomi Toiminnen - Rolleiflex

If any readers have ever thought about getting into analogue medium format photography but are put off by the hassle of processing their own films, don’t be! It’s way easier than you think and once you’ve successfully hang up your first roll to dry you’ll be hooked. As for colour. Well, that’s turning out to be a pricey business these days. Colour negative processing has just doubled in price here, about €8.99 per roll, so include the film cost and you’re looking at €18 at least for twelve shots (without scans). My friend has just started doing colour at home because of this and is really happy with the results, I will go the same route very soon.

I’d like to also mention two other cameras as a much cheaper alternative to a 2.8e or such like. I acquired a Rolleicord IV with a 75mm 3.5 Schneider Kreuznach Xenar for €120, see attached images for comparison. The other camera that really surprised me is the Zeiss Ikon Nettar 518/16 with a 75mm 3.5 Novar-Anastigmat – I picked this up from a local flea market for €35 in fully working order! This is a zone focus camera so I got my hand on a Voigtländer rangefinder that attaches to the cold shoe, this helps loads. The images form this camera are also sublime though a bit slower to use than the Rolleiflex, the output is worth it.

Lisa Marie, test shot for her model agency. Available light coming in through a window.

Lisa Marie - Rolleiflex

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Ludi again.

Ludi 01 - Rolleiflex

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Viktoria. Test shot for her agency when she was starting out two years ago. She’s all over the planet now.

Viktoria - Rolleiflex

So, in conclusion, I use my 2.8e for just about anything and everything as long as it’s not running. It’s light and very, very quiet. It can be discreet as you can just stand in the street looking down and press the shutter and no one really knows (I guess this is how Vivian Maier took a lot of her shots). There’s still plenty of specialists servicing and repairing them and has a strong enthusiast following and collectors worldwide. Shoot one roll of film on this and I’m sure you’ll be hooked. At the end of the day it’s just another tool for us to realize the images we want to create and like each of us has our own favourite bits of kit to do the job we all end up in that ‘special realtionship’ with one or two cameras. Happy shooting people

All the best,

Andy Jackson

Shoe repair dude, Goodge Street underground station, London. It was very dark.

Shoe repair dude - Rolleiflex

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Paul Clements, photo journalist, Beatles and Dylan fan, guitar and sitar player at Stephen Bartels Gallery, London (with our 3 Leicas huddled together)

Paul Clements - Rolleiflex

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Feeding the duck and goose on a rainy afternoon in the Lake District, Cumbria, England on a visit to my mum this year.

Noah goose - Rolleiflex

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Reflection in a pond.

Noah pond - Rolleiflex

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Ice cream on a Sunday.

Noah ice cream hut - Rolleiflex

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Rolleicord. Kayla, my Siberian Husky and test model, never to be trusted off the line in a forest, or anywhere for that matter. Highly successful hunter.

Kayla - Rolleicord

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Ingemar Backman, Swedish snowboard legend shot at the Air & Style contest here in Innsbruck. Google him for insanely high backside air shots!

Ingemar ©andyjackson

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A friend of mine asked me to shoot a wedding shower for her friend. Grandma showed up and watched the proceedings from this chair. One of my favorite shots ever despite the light leak.

Grandma - Roleliflex

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This is Glenn, I used to work with him on the snowboard magazine. He works in Thredbo Ski Resort in the Aussie winter then travels around Europe to visit his adoring friends. The man is a legend.

Glenn - Rolleiflex

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Rolleicord. Forest scene. A much cheaper alternative but not the build or lens quality of the 2.8. Still not bad at all!

Forest - Rolleicord

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. Gabrille du Ploy shot in her gallery, Zebra One, that specializes in music photography amongst other things. That’s part of the complete set of original images shot for Beatles Abbey Road sleeve on the wall. And you thought a Leica was expensive…

Gabrielle Du Ploy - Rolleiflex

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Sort of street photography shot in Charlie’s mens hairdresser in Camden, London.

Charlies Camden - Rolleiflex

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Alex, a yoga teacher friend of mine, we did some shots in the forest near me. A reflector was used to light the face.

Alex yoga - Rolleiflex

Sep 092014
 

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Shooting with Film: My Rolleiflex Hy6 Mod 2 Experience

By Steve Huff

I will admit it right up front. I never ever shoot film anymore. As more time goes on, digital technology for imaging is getting better and better. Companies like Sony, Olympus and yes, EVEN LEICA are pushing the envelope in many ways from the groundbreaking Sony A7 series to the Olympus OMD series to the Leica Monochrom (A camera no other company dared to even attempt). Digital is starting to mature and we can do things today with digital technology that was not even imaginable back in the glory days of film. For example, can I shoot film at ISO 102,000 ISO and get a results I can use in a pinch? No way. Can a camera such as the Hy6, when shooting film,  give me the convenience of digital? NO WAY, never.

So then, why on earth would I even use this camera and shoot film? I call it romance, beauty, soul, and most of the things that digital usually does not get right. Analog is a different beast than digital in almost every way. The colors, the true B&W, the grain, the contrast and depth and when talking about Medium Format we are talking about a format that also has some magic associated with it.

My fave film of all time, Kodak Portra 160 – click for larger

brandondomes

Even so, the Rolleiflex Hy6, with a lens and film back and finder will set you back close to $10k. Yes, $10,000. With that in mind, remember than a Leica Monochrom camera with a decent lens will also set you back about $10k and it will only shoot B&W digital in the 35mm format. The Rollei can do B&W film, color film, and even digital if you splurge for a nice digital back. Add to that the size of the film. You will get much more “soul” with the MF rig over any 35mm rig. So price wise, it is up there with the other Niche products in the imaging world. Leica S at $30k, the Leica M at $8k, the Leica MM at $8k, all without lenses. So taking that into consideration, the price of the Rolleiflex Hy6 is about right. Especially considering that it is probably the most versatile Medium Format film/Digital camera made to date. It’s a true beauty in use and with its auto focus capabilities it was shooting faster than the Sigma DP Quattro I had on hand at the same time.

Using Ilford HP5 film with the Rolleiflex – click for larger 

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carwindow

In Use

This write-up is meant to be a short article about my time with the camera, not in any way a tech review. I find most of those boring anyway so instead I just want to chat about how I felt using the camera, the costs involved with it and the experience of shooting film again. The Hy6 Mod 2 is a large camera, especially when coming from 35mm cameras such as the Sony’s, the Leica’s and the Olympus’s of the world. The Hy6 is not a camera you will casually just carry around. It has a purpose, a meaning, a job to do. A camera such as this with the 80mm lens is really a portrait shooters dream camera. Auto Focus which is pretty fast and accurate (for MF) and a great ergonomic layout with a nice grip. The meter inside the eye level finder worked great as well. When I went out with the Hy6 I felt like I was a serious shooter and I got looks thrown at me like “what the hell is that guy shooting with”. It’s an impressive beast for sure but also a very functional beast.

The last time I shot medium format was when I reviewed the Fuji 670, and I adored that camera. It was slim, large and a true rangefinder. But for some reason, it was a totally different experience that shooting the Rolleiflex. It was lighter, and slower in use. It did not feel nearly as substantial in the build nor was it as bulletproof. The Hy6 is such a camera. It is built to a high standard, has all controls easily accessible and is a true photographers camera. It’s just large and a bit heavy, though nothing like the old school MF cameras of the 80’s which were like metal back-breaking bricks.

1st shot with HP5

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and this one was in near darkness with Delta 3200 film – I LOVE Delta 3200 and always have

delta3200debby

One thing that I thought would limit me when using this camera was LIGHT. With film, you have to use the film you have loaded and when I had Portra 160 loaded, any low light scenario was ruled out. With digital, you can go into any light and adjust your ISO settings in the camera. Easy. With film, you have to change your film when you want different sensitivity. Lucky for me, just as I finished up my roll of HP5, which is an ISO 400 film, I loaded in my Delta 3200 (which is an ISO 3200 film) and was able to shoot the image able in near darkness, even with the 2.8 aperture of the 80mm lens attached to the Hy6. The room was an old solitary confinement prison room from the old historic Yuma Territorial Prison. It smelled of urine, was creepy as hell and Debby was not too cozy inside. I asked her to kneel down and give me her serious face for a dark, moody but nice image. I thought the shot would be blurred or exposed wrong but when the scans came back from the lab I was very happy with the results from 95% of the images I shot.

Overall, when using the Hy6 I LOVED it and had a great time with it. It fit in one of my Wotancraft bags by itself and came out when I wanted a shot that I knew would be nice.

Again with Portra 160 out in Sedona (BTW, we have 2 seats left for the southwest workshop HERE and we will be in Sedona for this trip)

johnsedona

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The Downsides to a camera like the Hy6

There are downsides to the Hy6 but image quality is not one of them. For me, I thoroughly enjoyed my time with the camera. I was able to shoot with it for two weeks and within that time frame I shot 5 rolls of medium format film, 12 exposures each. Out of those images only two had issues that were my fault. The rests were perfect, spot on with metering and the lens performed as it should. But with medium format film one has to consider the costs involved of using it. For me, 5 rolls of film (purchased from Amazon), processing at my local lab as well as scans from my local lab (low res) cost me around $106. So basically, for 60 images it cost me over $100. Sure, many will say “I process my own film” and others will say “I scan my own film”. Even so, processing color film is not something many people do these days. Even if you do your own, you still have to buy the film and buy the chemicals and materials needed to process your own. Then you need to buy a nice scanner. Then you need the hours upon hours it takes to scan and do your own tweaks. It’s expensive and time-consuming.

So for anyone considering film these days, think about the costs involved is using a lab, or the time involved if doing it yourself. As for me, I have NO spare time these days to do any processing or scanning so a lab was my only choice. Shooting 60 images on my digital would cost me nothing so when really looking at it in this light, digital is a bargain :) You still will not get that Analog tangible quality..the old school richness and feel, the reach out and touch it tonality and oh so delicious color. You will get close, and in many case you will get sharper and more details with digital but nothing can replicate the look of Medium Format film.

I see the Hy6 as a camera I would use a few times per year, for special occasions or when I wanted the 6X6 square format MF look. If this camera was $15k with a digital back, I would be all over it and would give up a Leica set to get it. But adding a digital back to this bad big will set you back around $30k and up. This is in addition to the camera cost itself!

So while there are loads of upsides to a camera like this, there are also downsides, depending on what you want to do with it and how much you would want to shoot. There is also no instant gratification with film. It took my lab a week to process and scan.

HP5 ISO 400 film

shatter

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ISO 160 Portra

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Wrapping it up

I sent back the Hy6 to Rolleiflex last week and wish I had it for one more week as I am going to shoot some Senior portraits next week. Would have been cool to do some creative shots with some nice film but I did not fink of it at the time. That right there is one of the occasions I would have loved to use this kind of camera for. They are few and far between for me but after browsing my images with this camera, on film, I have to say there is something special about them, even with silly subjects such as broken glass or an old abandoned building. I am a sucker for the square format and when I use it on digital as my aspect ratio it is never the same as a frame of Medium Format 6X6 film.

I really enjoyed the Rolleiflex and if it came inat $3500 I would buy one. At $10k, for me, it is a no go as I would not use it enough but for many this may be just what the doctor ordered. If you want medium format quality in a very versatile camera body that can do film or digital, that can shoot with autofocus and act like any modern-day camera and you do not mind shooting film with its costs and time involved, then the Hy6 may be just what you are looking for. For me, I would buy this over something like a Leica S camera because it is more versatile and I like the design better. With the Hy6 I can do film or digital and with a name like Rolleiflex, I would be shooting with a legend. The Hy6 also acts like any modern-day camera in regards to controls, settings, etc. It is all there on the side of the camera. Super easy to pick up and shoot. I did not even need the manual> i just loaded it, shot it, and it was all super easy without any confusion whatsoever. No long digital menus to drag through, just set it, forget it! Awesome.

You can buy the camera without a lens for $7900 at B&H Photo. They also have the accessories and digital backs for the camera. 

I have shot with only four medium format cameras in my life but this is my hands down favorite to date. If I was buying a MF camera today, this would be it.

windoold

yuma1

debbyandolive

bindomesouija

batzoo1

0296341-R1-E002

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0296342-R2-E013

0296341-R2-E022

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yuma5

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Sep 062014
 

Just for fun: Rolleiflex Hy6 using film vs The Sigma DP Quattro

To those who have shot or do shoot Medium Format film or digital, you know the differences between those files and your run of the mill full frame of APS-C files. With Medium Format film or digital you get an amazing depth, richness and tangible quality to the files and photos whether that is in print or on screen.

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Many times people will say that the Sigma DP series has a “Medium Format” quality but that can be a little misleading. For example, the latest and greatest Sigma DP Quattro was recently in my hands for 3 weeks to review. I reviewed it HERE and even I mentioned it had a medium format look and feel. But I was going by memory as it has been 4 years since I have shot a Medium Format camera (which I reviewed HERE).

Recently I had the pleasure of shooting with a Rolleiflex Hy6 Mod 2 camera and wow, that was quite the experience. From shooting, to feel, to control, to auto focus to QUALITY, this is the best MF camera I have ever shot with or even handled. It should be for $10k with lens and film back but the Rollei just may be the coolest medium format camera made today. At $10k it comes with a 6X6 film back but you can also add a digital back and have one bad ass setup.

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I shot 5 rolls through the Hy6 for my review period and will post that within a week but for now I wanted to show two shots…one from the Rollei Hy6 using Portra 160 film and the 2nd with the Quattro. These are NOT meant to be technical comparison shots, but rather a look at the rendering of each. The Rollei is a low res lab scan and the Sigma is a resized file converted to JPEG. Even so, the depth, the richness and the magical quality is all there in the Medium Format shot and the Sigma appears off in color and lacks the depth and richness that the film shot provides.

The only area where the Sigma is really “medium format like” to me is in sharpness and detail, which it has loads of. But even with that, I prefer the MF shot by far. Take a look below and see for yourself. The MF shot was with an 80mm lens at f/2.8. The Sigma shot was also at 2.8 using the built in lens of the Quattro and shot in 1X1 mode to simulate 6X6. After looking at them side by side it appears digital still has a load of room for improvement in the quiet balance area. Film just nails it it seems. Then again, how long as film been around? Much longer than digital! I did not get a digital back to test with the Rollei but shooting it with film was a treat, even though a pricey one (cost of purchasing 5 rolls plus process and low res scan = $100 for 60 images). The ROllei auto focused FASTER than the Sigma by a little bit.

Click them for larger.

The Rolleiflex Hy6 Mod 2 with the 80mm 2.8 lens and Portra 160 film – low res lab scan. This is best appreciated on a large and well calibrated display. This one has the MF look and soul. Not uber sharp but nice color, great depth and contrast is about perfect.

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Now the Sigma Quattro at f/2.8 – the color is off (a yellow tinge and there is much more DOF even using the same 2.8 aperture. It looks digital (and it is of course) and more flat but very sharp. 

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Sep 052014
 

What shooting film has taught me

By Zhao TianYu

About two weeks ago I made the decision to go back to film. Well ‘go back’ may not be entirely accurate – as someone who was born in the digital age, I have never shot film before (if you discount the times when I was still a child and used my parents’ film camera). I made the change because I found myself stuck in a creativity dead-end when it comes to street photography: after my recent trips to Bangkok and Nepal, I found the city I live in (Singapore) pretty boring, though some may disagree. I found myself keep going to the same places, use the same technique, and shoot more or less the same subjects. I read books, studied other people’s work, and I’ve decided maybe it’s time for a change in the medium as well as the approach. I bought a rangefinder and a couple rolls of film and my digital camera has been sitting in the dry cab since.

So now two weeks have passed, and I’ve shot about 10 rolls of film. Sure that’s not a lot, and I’m by no means a pro when it comes to film photography (I still lab scan my negatives). But I’ve learnt a lot from these two weeks, more than years of shooting digital. I’ve heard people say there’s no reason to shoot film from a technical point of view cause digital is much more versatile and convenient, but it is precisely the reason I switched back to film cause it is HARD. It helped me to slow down, and as a result I think a lot more when I shoot. I leant to guess the light, I learnt to look for interesting compositions or juxtapositions cause every frame must count since it costs me money, and learnt to appreciate the city I live in. It took a lot more time for me to finish 36 frames, but I have much more keepers.

Another reason why I prefer film is because the feeling when you get back your negatives and found out you have nailed the shot is extremely satisfying. Sure I’ve had screw-ups and disappointments along the way, but in general I found film photography to be much more rewarding than digital. With film I won’t chimp and look at my LCD screen all the time, and I often forgot what I took until I see the scan results. But it was precisely the reason that made me a better photographer, because I learnt to distance myself from my work. I became much more critical when editing my works, and when I’m not impressed by the results I’ve seen, I go out and shoot more. I stopped uploading my work everyday, and in fact this is the first time I’ve shown my street works to the public in two weeks. After all, you are only as good as your weakest shot.

Here are some of the images I took over the last two weeks. Hope you’ll like them. All images were taken with Leica M6 TTL (I was lucky to find a wonderful new old stock of the Millennium Black Paint edition) and 35mm Summilux FLE on Tri-x.

Regards,
Tianyu
Check out my instagram account @tianyuzhao

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Aug 272014
 

Shooting Cinema Film

By Mark Ewanchuk

Hi Brandon and Steve–I hope this email finds you well!

Inspired by prior posts from Brett Price and others, I decided to attempt to shoot and process cinema film. I have included five recent images, but this is more of a “how-to” for those so inclined.

More details may be found on my site at http://iftimestoodstill.net/developing-cinema-film/

The two main questions that I had getting started were:
How do I get the film off the 400+ ft roll, and into my bulk-loader?
How do I remove the Remjet with minimal mess and difficulty?
One of your readers (Thanks, Dominic!) http://blog.wakingmist.com/?p=1481 was most helpful in addressing some of these concerns.
I have since acquired large rolls of Kodak Vision3 500T, and Vision2 200T–of the two, I must say I prefer the 200T for it’s slightly finer grain structure.

As far as Question #1 goes: Into your standard changing bag, you will require:

Your bulk roll of cinema film (Take the sealing tape off the film tin, but don’t open it yet!!)
Your bulk loader
Some scissors
Some cellophane tape
An empty inner spool or roll, which will fit easily into your bulk loader. I used the plastic roll from a standard film canister–I had to drill out the core to ensure that it would slide freely onto the post of my bulk loader.
White cotton gloves (from eBay!) to avoid marking the film.
Once all above in the bag, open the film tin, then the inner bag, and find the end of the film reel. Next, (using a small piece of cellophane tape…) tape the leader to the inner reel you’ve set aside. Start rolling the film tightly onto the reel, ensuring that the inner surface (the emulsion side) stays IN. This will likely take you ~10 min to transfer ~50 feet of film, and make the roll approximately the same size as your bulk loader. When finished, cut the film, and load into your bulk loader in the usual fashion. Don’t forget to re-package and seal the bulk roll into the tin!!

The next part, you know how to do: Load your film into canisters, and shoot away!

As far as development goes, standard home C-41 works fine (I use the Tetanal kits)–but you need to get the Remjet off first. (Thanks again to Dominic for the tip!) I use 2 litres of SUPER HOT water, to which 2 tablespoons of standard, garden variety (well, home variety, I guess…) Baking Soda has been added. This step must be done before your standard pre-soak. Two litres should give you about six washes. The water will start black, turn to pinkish-grey, and should be clear by the final wash.

Process according to your standard method, then stop after your final wash (and before your stabilizer). Remove the film from the development canister and hang–wipe once with a soft sponge as carefully described on my site. Re-thread the roll, and run through the stabilizer…Surfactant and distilled water to finish up, and you’re all done!

Yes, it’s a lot of effort…but I really do enjoy the results.

;)

The film has a unique character, and really affords you some creative latitude. Thanks to all who have contributed to this ongoing odyssey.

Best regards,
Mark

PS: If anyone wants a roll or two, shoot me a line…I’m sure we can work something out!

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