May 222015
 
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San Francisco and the Xpan: how I think my photography

By Dirk Dom

I’m not manic now for a month or so, which is great, but I didn’t start or did anything. Day before yesterday I just stopped scanning at 1AM, yesterday and today I don’t feel in the mood. I ‘m going to start something because like now I waste time. My shots of S.F. are good. I learnt a lot about what’s interesting in photography. Not the usual tourist stuff.

The panorama’s of the Xpan I make straight, they look better that way, they look finished.

From this (original scan)

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To this:Select, process, transform, and stretch away. Anything goes.

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This one I think real special:

The Xpan on “B”, f/22, eight seconds’ exposure, hand held while a train got in the station. It moved, it’s double; the manikin ghost is made of the two overlapping images of that man.

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Peter Lik (one of the two photographers in the world who sell to the general public for lots and lots of money, and who is a commercial genius) sold a shot with a ghost for over 6 million dollars:

Maybe I can, this one, too? I’m happy with 5,999,995 dollars. I’d better keep the negative safe, because I’ll never be able to make this shot again.

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The shot I’m proudest of is this one:

Of course, this is the ultimate tourist shot. Just that I haven’t seen it yet and it’s so spectacular. I was walking near this boat, searching for interesting images, and I just couldn’t believe it when I discovered this one. The tower and this boat, couldn’t be better. I’d take the big Fuji 617 to S.F. just to take this one shot. But with the Linhof and the 47mm I can shoot it in 6×9 black and white and crop. Finding panoramic compositions is different, you have to fill the entire image with interesting stuff in a way that looks natural and not just shoot things that are in the middle; it takes an effort. I discover panoramics before I look through the camera and this one really hit me. Sometimes Photoshop helps: I’m crazy about fire escapes

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Original image:

Now, that wasn’t panoramic enough.

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Stretched (at these extreme perspectives you get away with anything):Nice, eh?

Kodak Ektar 100 is a sublime film which scans incredibly. Burnt out highlights like cloud parts, I don’t even look at them anymore, they’re always good. Shooting film is so much easier than shooting digital!
The 65mm (2.55 inch) negative of the Xpan is very comfortable to work with, with the Epson scanner at 2,400PPI I can enlarge to about two feet at 300DPI.

I really like the colors of this one:

A sidewalk, cement. Such fine color nuances you can get with the digital Leica, I don’t think I could get them with mu Olympus PEN. Look at the fine, etched highlights.

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I crop to this:

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Which reminds me of this:

Not doing anything with it, because the image isn’t good enough, but a new idea: associative photography, showing with an image what the abstract shot reminds you of. No words.

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The most typical S.F. shot I took: Haight Street, of course.

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From this shot, had a bit of work with it:

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Since legal, Marijuana is everywhere, must be a big boost to the economy.

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Finally, to show that I’m just as good as famous Flemish photographer Bert Danckaert: See how I put the shadow out of the middle? I’m an Artist Genius!
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Allez, groetjes,
Dirk.

May 192015
 
Drum Men

Hi Steve and Brandon,

My name is Richard Palmer

All these photos have been shot on a Mamiya 7ii using Ilford Hp5 and developed in Ilford Microphen.
The photo of my dad was shot at 1/125 using f8, the photo of my brother was shot at 1/30 using f5.6,
and the photo of the rugby pitch was shot at 1/250 using f16.

My details are:

Flickr
https://www.flickr.com/photos/richie_photographer
and my instagram is https://instagram.com/richardjamespalmer/

Thanks for this opportunity.

Richie.

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May 192015
 
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Return to film: Spring flowers in San Francisco

By Dirk Dom

Hi!

The last two years I’ve been serious about black and white on film and I grew to enjoy grain very much. With my Hasselblad Xpan I shot Kodak Ektar and fuji Superia 400 and I immensely liked the results. My Olympus PEN digital camera is extremely good, but I got tired of color noise. Film grain is beautiful, digital color noise is ugly.

So when I went to san Francisco this easter, I had my Xpan, my canon F1 and my Olympus PEN with me. And, not to my surprise, I didn’t shoot a single digital shot.

I wanted a creamy and graphical look for my flowers. The cream comes from shooting with a Canon FD 85mm f/1.2, at f/1.2. The graphical part comes from Fuji Superia 800. I used a 3 stop ND filter all the time. I used extension tubes. I don’t think there is any modern camera system that allows this kind of shots with modern lenses. Digitally, the Sony A7 with Canon FD 85mm f/1.2 and extension tubes and a $30 adapter would do the job perfectly. But I shot at ground level a lot, you’d need to use the screen, then.

Today I got my negatives back and I’ve met my objectives. This was what I had in mind. Sharpness freaks will be disappointed: this is not about sharpness but about beauty and atmosphere.

Film is beautiful.

Enjoy!

California is in its fourth year of draught, so there weren’t many flowers. Still, I got nice shots.
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Pacifica. A lily.

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At the beach.

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Also near the beach.

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Poppy, Golden Gate Park.

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Golden Gate Park. Shot through a flower in the foreground, focused on a flower behind. With the Canon F1 speedfinder I can shoot right to ground level.

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Cherry tree.

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The 85mm sometimes gives rainbows.

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Beach near the Golden Gate: great diversity of flowers. Unfortunately, they were mowing the path when I got there. 

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Poppies at f/1.2.

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Grain. Love it!

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Bernal Hill, all the flowers were already gone.

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Bye,
Dirk.

May 152015
 

Film Friday: Riots and Zeiss Biogon T* 2.8/25 on Leica M6

by fiftyasa

Steve already wrote a good review of the Zeiss Biogon T* 2.8/25 back in 2009 (http://www.stevehuffphoto.com/2009/11/18/the-zeiss-zm-25-2-8-biogon-lens-review/), but the lens does not seem very common among Leica M shooters, especially if compared to other Zeiss lenses like the Planar 50 or Biogon 35.

I recently picked up one copy and tried to shoot some street action in the city of Hamburg where every year peaceful demonstrations and riots take place as a tradition on May 1st. Mounted on a Leica M6 loaded with TriX 400 and TMAX 400, I made my way through the “urban guerrilla”…

Shooting from the hip while walking and pre-setting the focus distance seem to work OK with a bit of luck (although the agents seem to smile at me, I don’t think they realized that I took a photo of them shooting from the hip):

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But the lens is wide! It seems you are never close enough… In the following 2 pictures I pre-set the focus distance, walked as close as I could and used the viewfinder to (guess-)frame.

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In the picture “you are never close enough” it is interesting to see that the 2 subjects did not notice me despite I was at less than 1 meter from them, while the young guy and the woman behind were probably asking themselves what I was doing so close…

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Unfortunately most of the copies of this lens bring up the 35 mm frame lines on the M6, M9 and Zeiss Ikon ZM. This is a bit distracting for me. The 28 mm frame lines would be a better choice (but not perfect, this lens is substantially wider!) if the external viewfinder is not available, but, at the time the lens came to the market, it targeted the M8 where the correct frame lines (35 mm equivalent) is triggered.

It is known that the lens can focus down to 0.5 m but the rangefinder disengages at 0.7 m. So if you want to use it from 0.7 and 0.5 m, you’ll have to guess the distance. I would also like to mention that, despite some websites state that the Zeiss Ikon ZM can use the rangefinder to focus down to 0.5m, this is not true. I have a Zeiss Ikon ZM and the rangefinder disengages at 0.7 m like the Leica M6 and M9.

Being the angle of view so wide, the Biogon 25 is an ideal companion for landscapes and cityscapes

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Or to give a “wide angle effect” to your shots:

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Or to capture a lot of things in one frame:

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Yes, the lens is sharp. In the picture above you can actually read the street sign next to the last flag on the right:

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Three more attempts to get closer to the subject:

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These pictures are digitalized by photographing the Kodak negatives with a Sony A7 mounted on a copy stand and equipped with bellow and macro lens Apo Rodagon-D 1x 75 mm. Negatives are inverted with negfix8 and post-processed (mainly tone curve adjustment only).

If you like to see more, please visit https://fiftyasa.wordpress.com

May 132015
 

Leica M6 TTL & Eeyore’s Birthday Party 2015

By Khunya Lamat Pan

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Hello all! Some might recognize my name and you may attribute it to my extreme loyalty to the Pentax K1000 and the Super-Takumar line of lenses. While I still LOVE the hell out of those, I finally made a big purchase on my dream camera and bought a nearly mint Leica M6 TTL body with a Voigtlander Nokton 50mm f/1.5 lens. I chose the M6 due to its pure mechanical nature, with the exception of the light meter. Much like the K1000 actually! I like having the option of using a light meter, but if it fails or the battery dies, I can at least keep on shooting without any hiccups.

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Not long after I bought the new setup, the annual festival in Austin, TX known as Eeyore’s Birthday Party took place. For anyone not familiar, the festival is a celebration of the character Eeyore created by A.A. Milne. Most everyone probably knows him from Winnie-the-Pooh. The festival has live music, egg toss, yoga, drum circles, food/beer, a real donkey, etc. It’s an all day event held in a beautiful park, and while it can get quite intense, the best thing to do is to find a nice shady patch on the hill within the trees and set up camp to watch all the interesting people walk by.

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The M6 performed flawlessly. Like any Leica, it didn’t attract attention to itself in a horde of people. And while nearly everyone at the festival had a DSLR with them, I still felt relatively discreet. For the intensity of the festival, I felt the M6 was the perfect tool. I never felt like I had to worry about it, it just always works and feels smooth and precise. Even changing film on it in a crowd of people was easy, and I was expecting the worst since many people seem to hate the M6’s loading system. It was a very hot and sunny day, so I chose Ilford Pan F+ 50 and Efke KB 25 film. Efke is not longer in production, but I have stockpiled a lot of it in my freezer for special occasions like this. My style has always been to shoot more wide-open, so these two films are perfect for me, especially since I reside in sunny Texas. I developed them using Rodinal and Ilford Stop/Fix baths, and scanned myself using the Plustek Opticfilm 8200i 35mm film scanner.

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On to the pictures! You can follow me on Flickr here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/khunya

You can also check out my website here: http://www.khunyalamatpan.com/

Thanks for looking, and I hope you enjoy!

-Khunya

Apr 282015
 

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Dad’s Last Roll of Film

By Darek Meyer

Hi Steve,

I hope you`re doing well!

On my side – not that many changes since my last mail. I`m still in Asia, still taking pictures. With Robert Kresa, we`ve started “Where Were We” page. All our new things, as well as some older stuff, is there:
http://www.where-were-we.com

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These days, gear manufacturers keep us busy – all these new cameras, lenses, all sharp and all… This story however is not about gear.

Some time ago, I went back home to Poland, to arrange things and catch up with friends. At home, going through papers, I`ve found a box, full of old prints from my student times. There was also a roll of film.  To my surprise, they were not my pictures. They`ve been taken by my Father. After some investigation, it turned out they were shot around 1971-72, during his trip to Hungary. The camera used was most likely russian Smena 8M.

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The thing is, I do not recall my Father taking any pictures. Yes, he could paint, and he was good with it. But pictures? I started to look for more negatives, hoping to see more of his work. Well, not actually work – but captured pieces of his life, years back. I started to ask questions. And got very few answers. Too long time ago, already too many people passed. To my surprise, it occurred he was renting darkroom from one of local photographers. As I was told, there were several rolls developed and printed every week. What was there? Friends, architecture, nature, … ??!!

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But here is no happy end.

No more rolls.

The negatives I`ve found, they are just transparent. They did not survive harsh conditions of storage. They`ve been kept at countryside house, exposed to humidity, low and high temperatures, rats, and gods know what else. The old house my parents lived in, was sold, rebuild, so no chance to find forgotten negatives somewhere in the attic. This is it. Just 36 frames.

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I`ll keep on asking, keep on searching through family, if they have any prints left. I know that chances of success are small, as this is second or third generation already. People do not keep old things anymore. For you, just couple of frames. Are they world-class photographs? For sure not. There will be no more mention about them. But they are reflecting one of most important things in photography. And this is not about pixels, fps, or flares. They keep memories of people and events alive. They let me learn more things about my family.

Best regards,

Darek Meyer

Apr 242015
 

Street Photography in Dublin Ireland with Film

By Fergus Fitzgerald

Hi All,
I hope I am familiar to most of the regulars here as I post a lot as a commentator but never before as a contributor. I suppose you could call me a street photographer in as much as most of my photography seems to take place on the streets. My interests in photography these days is in street photography and those photographers who are regarded as being talented in this genre.

I do not take myself too seriously. I think street photography is valuable in the sense that it is entirely without an agenda which is its strength.

I realise this is a gear orientated site and I am definitely not a gear head though most photographers who say that are actually not telling the truth ! How can I explain this ? You see we all start out with an ambition to produce a great image -the image that is in our heads – if we do not succeed we will try again and again always seeking that elusive image. If you have experienced this feeling and know the frustration and remain faithful to that image in your head -then you are a photographer simple as that.

We can try all kinds of ways to achieve our goal -most of us (myself included ) at some time or other will succumb to the allure of the apparatus. If only we could get that new piece of equipment -that would make the transformation for us . In time we learn that the secret is to just keep shooting with what you have and try to become enthused more by the images you are creating and not the apparatus used. Mind you, I am more than willing to concede that gear can and does inspire people. So once you don’t go too crazy, what’s the harm in enjoying a new Nikon Canon Sony or even a Leica ? Not all at once of course !

I have used many cameras in my day and finally settled for Leica for many reasons -firstly they are beautiful and minimalist in the extreme and have superb optics. Secondly I like the European heritage -not to mention a desire to be a bit different.

I think of my images as being snaps for the thinking snapper. I hope anybody who recognises himself or herself in one of my photos will have the sense of humour to just have a laugh as I would never take an image to show a person in a bad way -though I will not allow my photography to become anodyne either.

These images are mostly from my M6 with 35 and 50 Summicron lenses on Ilford XP2 film scanned on my Nikon Coolscan V ED .  The images are just incidents I happened upon as I walked around where I live which is Dublin Ireland . For example the girl walking in costume reading the book was an actress rehearsing her lines during a break at the Samuel Beckett Theatre festival.

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I tend to shoot mostly with the 50mm lens and do not get too up close. Despite what Capa said I feel you can still produce good pictures from a slight distance. I cannot for example imagine myself ever using a 28mm or wider for street -though many do this magnificently.

I traded my M6 for an M8 seven or more years ago and occasionally I get a Lumix G1 on loan from a friend .I used this to get the image of the old lady bemused by the two guys reaction to whatever was on the laptop screen. I actually like the G1 a lot as it is nice and compact and produces good colour images -though I’m not a big fan of EVF’s Actually none other than Saul Leiter used one at the latter part of his career!

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The photo below was taken in Moore St Dublin where traditional traders still sell from stalls and many have family roots going back generations:

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The old gent looking through the view window is in Temple bar which has nice bars and restaurants and is a great spot for street photography. My favourite haunt there is “The Gallery of Photography “where I have seen such wonderful exhibitions as Genesis by Salgado. Keen eyed photographers will see this is not a film scan -it’s actually from the M8.

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Luck and happenstance play a big part in street photography. One day I was in the old Animal Museum in Dublin known to the kids of Dublin as the “Dead Zoo” with my nephew when I snapped a photo of him looking in wonder at a Moose. When the film was processed it turned out to be a different kid altogether as my nephew had wandered off to view something else! Years later myself and friends would visit “Yellowstone Park” in the US and I would have a very similar reaction to a live Moose -Wow they are big!

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When I got the M8 I shot almost exclusively in colour but now I mostly shoot in black and white . I love the way Leica M digital cameras render black and white. I have not seen better. Strangely I now seem to be shooting Black and White on digital and colour on film which is the reverse of a lot of photographers I know. Kodak Portra film has a lot to do with this as I love it‘s subtle pastel like colours. I have now resurrected my ancient Pentax K1000 and a few Takumar lenses for colour.

Hope you like the images.

Rgds Fergus Fitzgerald

PS might post a few colour street photos from the M8 in the future…….? Thanks Steve and Brandon.

Apr 232015
 

Film Friday: Hasselblad 500C Love

by Massimilliano Farinetti

My photographic evolution brought me back to the roots and after the Leica M2 (daily inspiration #736) I traded it in for a very nice 1961 Hasselblad 500C with three CZ lenses (50/80/150)

It is almost six months I shoot only film, only medium format and only black&white (self processed) and I am enjoying it like a kid in a toy store.  Why? Because I am re-discovering the pleasure to experiment, the slow decisions about framing, playing with exposures…

In a word: photography.

I like to shoot long exposures, from some seconds to minutes with an accurate calculation of reciprocity failure time correction, using ND and GND filters on low-speed films

But the whole process doesn’t end up with film processing and scanning: analog photography is a chain from exposure in camera to exposure of paper in the darkroom and so it went. I live in Genova, in the north-west of Italy on the Ligurian Sea, so my favorite winter scenes are at sea either when it is calm or when the waves are strongly beating the shores: long exposures will turn the latter in a “time suspended” surreal atmosphere.

Here I enclose some of those scenes I like most, film I used for them are either Ilford FP4+ (exposed at 80 asa) or Fomapan 100 (exposed at 50 asa), Hasselblad 500C with Planar 80/2,8

Thank you again if you will admit my photos to your always stimulating website

Cheers!

Massimiliano Farinetti

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Apr 202015
 

Shooting Streets with the Olympus OM-1

By Justin Halim

With so many people buying the ever-more popular Olympus OM mirrorless cameras, I thought I would pay homage to the original OM – the OM-1 35mm SLR – with which the mirrorless system derives its name and styling.

The OM-1 is an incredible camera, period.  Based on the Leica M camera (it was even called the M-1 before Leica complained about it), the OM-1 maintains the same philosophy of its German inspiration – simplicity.  This has led many to call the OM-1 the Leica SLR – they have identical dimensions, similar dial placements, and similar shooting methods.  And like the Leica M, the OM is the perfect street photographer’s camera.  I actually got very lucky with my system – after Hurricane Sandy a couple years ago, I was cleaning my house and found a bag with four OM Zuiko lenses – a 28mm f2.8, a 35mm f2.8 SHIFT, a 135mm f2.8, and a 50mm f1.8, along with a beaten up Olympus OM-G (the consumer OM model).  I can’t even describe how excited I was by this – I immediately went on eBay and bought myself a nice OM-1 to mount the lenses.

Coming from a Leica M6, I found the OM-1 very intuitive and natural to use.  It is very small (it fits perfectly in a Leica M case), built incredibly well, and very elegant – it doesn’t have the “industrialness” of a Nikon F3, but more of a jewelry-like quality, like a fine Swiss watch.  The viewfinder is the biggest and brightest viewfinder I have ever looked through, the shutter makes just a soft whispery click, and the Zuiko lenses are simply amazing – they have a certain character that makes pictures pop out at you.  I actually often find myself preferring my OM-1 to my Leica M6.  And to top it all off, they are dirt-cheap – I got my OM-1 with a 50mm 1.8 for just $70!  For anyone looking to get into 35mm film, I highly recommend this camera.

From a shooter’s perspective, the OM-1 is like a breath of fresh air to shoot.  It is so easy and so simplistic – it is that rare camera that makes shooting just pure fun.  Everything about it allows for quick and efficient shooting.  With its portable and unobtrusive design, quick focusing system and versatile lenses, it is an outstanding street photography camera.  In fact, I only ever really use it for the occasions I shoot street photography, which is kind of a shame – it deserves to be used more. My parents both work NYC, so on the days they bring me, I spend hours just walking around with my OM-1 taking pictures of whatever, just because it is so much fun to use.   Using this camera is what makes me look forward to my visits to the city.

Thank you everyone for reading and thank you Steve for publishing this article!  I hope you all enjoy the pictures!  I believe all photos were taken with the 135mm f2.8 Zuiko and 50mm f1.8 Zuiko, on Kodak Ektar, Iflord PanF, and Kodak TMax.

Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/112710288@N03/

Instagram: http://instagram.com/justinhalim/

Washington Square Fountain 

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This man noticed I was taking pictures, and approached me asking if I wanted a rap in exchange for a portrait and a couple of bucks.  I don’t regret saying yes.

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In NYC parks, chess is a very popular game.  Chess tables are built into the ground, and many players will sit and call out to passerby’s asking if they want to play.

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There are hundreds of street musicians in NYC, but this musician is my favorite.  He plays in a duo called the Outlaw Ritual with whom I believe is his wife (I may be wrong), and they can always get a crowd going.

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One of the many “Pigeon Men” of Washington Square.  They attract pigeons and let the birds perch on them.  Sometimes they hand pigeons over to tourists for fun.

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I had never actually seen one of the people who hang the posters that line NYC’s streets, so I found this strangely interesting.

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In the summer, the city boasts some surprisingly colorful gardens.

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Even among all the concrete, there are plenty of grassy spots to sit and relax (or study, as many NYU students do in the park).

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The other half of Outlaw Ritual.

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One of the many ways people get their voices heard in the city – chalking messages on the sidewalk.

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Apr 172015
 

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Mamiya 6 with Rollei Crossbird

By Frank Stelzer

Hi Steve, Brandon,

Being a long time follower, I thought I submit a story for your Film Friday series. I have been enjoying your site since 2010, when I was soaking in your Leica M9 and lens reviews all night. It was the first time that I got to know about Leica in detail; what they are, what you can do and what you cannot do, and I have been infected with the Leica virus ever since. I also value your Daily Inspirations and Film Friday series as platform to get to know other approaches, techniques and cameras.

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Quickly about myself, I have been fascinated with the process of making photographs since I was a teenager. My first equipment has been a viewfinder film camera in the 1980’s. I basically clicked what I found interesting enough to preserve as a memory. In the late 90’s I made the move from an Olympus mju-I to a film Pentax SLR and a monster 28-200 3.8- 5.6, because I thought, the bigger the camera and the lens, the better my photos. Little to nothing I knew about film sizes, f-stops and most importantly light. This changed gradually over the past 15 years, but there is still so much to learn. Somewhere in between I jumped on the digital bandwagon, enjoying the instant gratification of seeing the image immediately.

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I don’t remember since when I had this growing curiosity about medium format film, maybe it was your GF670 review. But it really accelerated after getting Jonathan Canlas’ book “Film is not dead” two years ago. Since then I gathered information about MF from almost everywhere.
I thought a portable camera would be nice, so I can easily take it with me when travelling. This sort of narrowed it down to a couple of rangefinder cameras: Fujifilm GF670, Mamiya 6 and 7.  I went for the Mamiya 6, which ticked the boxes in my book. It just feels right in your hand. The grip is fantastic, letting your hand mold around it nicely. Not only while shooting, but also when just walking around with the camera in the hand and the strap around the wrist. That’s one of the differences which made me go for the Mamiya instead of the Fujifilm GF670. One reason I preferred the Mamiya 6 over the Mamiya 7 was the retractable lens of the former, making it easy to put into a messenger bag (with Hadley Pro insert) without getting too bulky.

I only got the 75mm lens. There are also 2 more lenses (50mm and 150mm) available for the Mamiya 6, making it a nice system. There is a dark slide in the Mamiya 6 that you have to open and close manually when changing lenses when there is film inside the camera. This could lead to missing shots if you forgot to open the dark slides after a lens change. But for me it was not a problem with one lens only. The RF patch had a bit less contrast for my taste, which made focusing taking a bit longer at times. I did not consider 645 format at that time, since I was intrigued by the bigger 6×6/6×7 format.

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When my wife and I visited Australia last year, I decided to try Rollei Crossbird film for shooting some urban landscape. I never did cross-processing before, but I was curious to see what color-shift effects I would get. This film is marketed especially for cross-processing, but at the end you can take any film and cross-process it. As it seems, this film has a tendency to develop a green cast and also some visible grain. Nothing you can’t do with a digital camera and Lightroom, but definitely more fun. I am more than happy about the result I got with the Mamiya 6 and Rollei Crossbird. It’s sounds strange, but limiting yourself can be quite liberating. When shooting digital, there are endless post-processing options, that it’s easy to get carried away if you don’t know exactly what you are aiming for.

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Many people say that shooting film is a different experience compared to a digital camera. And I totally agree with them. I take more time thinking about the composition and exposure settings. Then there is the uncertainty and waiting for the film getting developed. Well, you could put tape on your DSLR’s screen and wait a week or so putting the SD card into your computer, but it’s not the same thing. Don’t get me wrong, I don’t mean to start any film vs. digital discussion. For me it’s both film and digital. Since I am an amateur, I have the freedom to decide depending on my mood, whether to go out with film or digital camera. I enjoy both. We live in a time where we have all these many different photographic tools and formats available, where everybody can find something according to his/her own interest and budget. The good thing about film cameras is that you can sell them almost at the same price you bought them, because they don’t depreciate anymore. This makes it easy to try different formats and systems until you find the one you like most.

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I should mention that I sold the Mamiya 6 meanwhile. Not because I didn’t like it, but because the shooting experience was very similar to the Leica, both being rangefinder cameras. I wanted something more challenging for my medium format adventures, so I traded it for a Hasselblad 503CX. Admittedly, it’s a not as travel-friendly as the Mamiya 6. In fact, it is a completely different beast and lets me discover photography from another angle. But that might be another Film Friday story.

My social media links:
Website: www.frankstelzerphotography.com
Instagram: https://instagram.com/frankstelzer
Twitter: https://twitter.com/frankstelzer

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Apr 172015
 

Hasselblad Xpan and Kodak Ektar: Port of Antwerp

By Dirk Dom

Hi!

Last Monday, my friend Ivo Smets and I went to shoot in the Port of Antwerp; Ivo with his M240, and me with the Xpan. I think that is the most delightful camera I own; I shot Kodak Ektar and because that film is so special, I expected some sparks.

First, we went to the Berendrechtsluis. The weather was nice, sunny and a bit hazy, which gave for sort of a high key atmosphere.

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We were lucky enough to find a gate open so we could get right next to the water.

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But shooting through the wire is fun, too. It sort of adds to the composition.

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Here’s some more fun, looking through stuff:

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In Lillo, a little village right in the middle of the port, we ate lunch. The tide was low, which made for a nice image:

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Lots of current in the river.

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We continued through the port. Antwerp is the largest petrochemical industry center in the world.

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There used to be a lot of fortresses around Antwerp. This one is from Spanish times. It’s covered by sand. It’s a forbidden entry zone, and right next to it is a lake where birders set up and shoot.

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We continued to the old crane museum near downtown Antwerp.

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We walked along the river to downtown Antwerp; the sun was setting. I had taken 4 films with me, which is 84 photographs, 21 a film. I was running out of film.

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My last shot of the day:

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I shot the Xpan with its 45mm lens. The negative size is 24 x 65mm, which makes the lens (horizontally) equivalent to 24mm on full frame. I scanned with an Epson V750 with Silverfast. Ektar scans great.

Bye,
Dirk.

Apr 152015
 

West Coast Monochrom

by Phillipp Wortmann

These are photographs taken along the California West Coast during a trip in march 2015. The route was roughly LA – San Clemente – Joshua Tree – Morro Bay – Big Sur – Santa Cruz – Point Reyes – San Francisco.
As I like to keep it simple I brought only my M6, 35 Summicron IV and a bunch of Kodak TriX film. It doesn’t matter if it’s cameras, lenses or film – if I bring more than one I can never decide what to use so limiting myself in that way actually gives me a lot more peace of mind.

For the past year or so I have been almost exclusively shooting 35mm color film but for this trip I wanted to give the black and white another go. This decision was actually made a couple of weeks prior to the trip when I went through my archive and rediscovered some of my older black and white film photos. You can check my little user report on that HERE.

Westcoast_2015_Kodak_TriX_Leica_Film-1

Westcoast_2015_Kodak_TriX_Leica_Film-2

Westcoast_2015_Kodak_TriX_Leica_Film-3

Westcoast_2015_Kodak_TriX_Leica_Film-4

Westcoast_2015_Kodak_TriX_Leica_Film-5

Westcoast_2015_Kodak_TriX_Leica_Film-6

Westcoast_2015_Kodak_TriX_Leica_Film-7

Another reason for going with black and white was that I had already been to do southwestern US the year before where I shot all Kodak Portra 160. So to avoid ending up with very similar photos from two different trips using Kodak TriX 400 made sense. If you like you can see the color shots from last year here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/derphilipppp/sets/72157648794789646/

So overall the trip was a blast and although I didn’t shoot as much as I had hoped/planned/anticipated I’m really happy with some of the shots I got. I will probably need to find a darkroom to do some prints soon.

The entire album can be viewed here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/derphilipppp/sets/72157651692347201/

You can also see more of my photos here: lifeon35.tumblr.com and instagram.com/derphilipppp/

Best regards and thanks for the opportunity to showcase my work!

Philipp

Apr 142015
 

Black & White with Leica M6, M9 and MM

By Dan Bar

Hi Steve & Brandon! About 8 years ago a friend of mine , a well-known photographer in Israel told me he wanted to buy the new digital Leica M8. I thought very highly of him and decided to go and see the new wonder. Yes it was a Leica, looked like one and was VERY expensive.

I have always dreamed of one but never wanted to spend so much , so I offered the salesman my Canon 5D + some lenses and to my great amazement he agreed to switch. I had to add some money of course as I also wanted 2 lenses with it. Since then I sold the M8, bought the M9, than sold it for the MM .

I also had the M6 for some time but the trouble dealing with film and development made me sell it too.

The purchase of the M8 , MM and M6 incited my love for black and white again. With my Canon 5D I only shot color. There is something about Leica that draws the user to b&w and I don’t know why. This odd attraction made me buy the Leica MM which I think is a fantastic b&w camera, as close to film as can be ( at least in my opinion. ) I know Steve prefers the 240 and so does Mr. Thorsten Overgaard, ( he told me so). I love the 240 but i mainly use it for color photos but here are some of my B&W photos which I like and hope you will like too.

Thank you
Danny

M9\35 mm

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M6\35mm

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M9\35mm

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Leica MM\35 mm

L1009126

Leica MM\35 mm

L1007720

Leica MM\ 35 mm

L1008675

M9\35mm

L1004366

M9\35

L1006938-2

M9\35mm

-1-121

M9\35

L1006923

Leica MM\35mm

L1010247

Leica MM\35

L1009963

Leica MM\35

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Leica MM\50mm

L1011256-Edit

It is not easy to decide which photos to send, I am not saying I dont like color photos and yet BLACK & White has its uniqueness. I love your site and look at it on a daily basis.

Thanks
Danny

Apr 102015
 

Wales in B&W. Film.

By Ibraar Hussain

Hi Steve and Brandon, I hope you had a joyous Easter. it’s almost Friday, and I thought I might submit an article again! How the weeks roll past!

To all those bored witless of the endless ramblings from I Hussain ESQ please turn away now!

I love going to visit Wales, fascinating place, and as magical and beautiful as can be. For all the delights and marvels of foreign lands, the East and the High Karakoram and Himalaya, the magic of Wales is right up there with the best of them and luckily I can return there again and again – being but a couple of hours drive West from London.

I think Black and White is suited in many ways to the broody landscape of fell and moor, beacon and megalithic standing stones and circles which are to be found in Wales. The landscape can be very bleak, and moody, with expansive skies and cloud. It can also be stunningly beautiful and uplifting with majestic coast lines and water features.

There were a couple of Films in my camera bag which I eventually decided, after a long hiatus, to develop. A roll of Rollei Retro 400s and a roll of Rollei Pan 25 – both shot with my Rolleiflex 3.5F. Both of these Films were exposed last Summer! Apart from my recent trip to Pakistan (March 2015) of which I’ve written already, I did absolutely no photography from August 2014 to March this year! Hard to believe but true! Rollei Retro 400s is a 400 ISO Film. I have never used it before, but have had exceptional results with the 80 speed Retro 80s before so had nothing but positive feelings about the results.

It’s a fine grained middle speed Film and has a nice character with slight red sensitivity it should give nice contrasty yet balanced results when developed with Rodinal. It has fine grain and has high sharpness. It features a tear proof clear polyester base which makes it excellent for scanning (the clear film base).

The other was another first for me; Rollei Pan 25. This is allegedly Agfa Pan 25. It is a very fine grained very slow ISO 25 speed Film with high sharpness and resolving power. It features extended Red sensitivity and a clear plastic base, so scanning again is very easy. This gave me a stiff lesson in how to meter for B&W. I have been using a Minolta Autometer III incident meter. The problem with this is that for B&W sometimes one should expose for the shadows and then control highlights in development. High contrast situations can mean a lack of shadow detail using this type of meter without being careful. Me being me took a light reading in the SUN rather than shade and off I went snapping away.

I shot this Film at Llanthony Priory, a ruin of an ancient priory which fell into decay after King Henry VIII ’s dissolution of the Monasteries in 1538.
It is a fascinating place with a wonderful remote atmosphere, and a photographers paradise. it has been photographed to death but there aren’t many B&W photos compared to colour. Anyway, needless to say the developed negatives were very contrasty and I had to work them in the Digital Darkroom (Photoshop CS4 Mac).

Rollei retro 400s was more forgiving but I made the same mistakes again. I shot this Film at the Waterfalls Walk by the River Ned, in the Brecon Beacons National Park. A magical place, full of delightful waterfalls, brooks and features, all in glorious woodland. I also managed one of an ancient Megalithic Standing Stone in the beacons. It can be tricky snapping away using a fully manual TLR and an incident light meter, but the whole process gave me some vital lessons which I have taken away and will not make the same mistakes again.

In future I will follow the golden rule of exposing for the shadows unless I want some more creative effect by adjusting exposure. Of course, with a 35mm Contax G2/T2/Tvs or SLR with an inbuilt centre weighted or matrix meter – it’s more straight forward, and incident meters are very useful too and 9 times out of 10 are superb, especially when dealing with backlighting, but for BW especially I think I need to be more careful.

Even with the exposure errors, I managed to get two rolls of mostly keepers! (20 shots all in) I’ve included some from each here, and have tried to reflect the atmosphere, mood and beauty of the places I visited.
I took some portraits of my Missus with a Rolleinar I and Rolleinar II but unfortunately they’re not for public show – the Rolleinar I especially is, I think, essential for the 3.5F if you want to shoot portraits with a very very shallow depth of field!
Black and White can be a very rewarding pursuit, and the more so with a manual camera and light meter, I waited 8 months to see my results – a far cry from instant Digital.
And Wales is a magical place.

All photographs:

Rolleiflex 3.5F, Rollei Gelb-Hell Yellow Filter, Minolta Autometer III.
Developed in Rodinal R09 1+50.
Scanned with an Epson 4990 flatbed using Epson Scan software.
Worked on in Photoshop CS4 Mac
I’ve used Overlay and brush tool to dodge and burn, used levels and curves. I then toned using a Pantone 7518c. then added a border.

Rollei retro 400s Maen Llia standing stone, Brecon Beacons.

Rolleiflex400s176

Sgwd Clun-Gwyn Waterfall, Brecon Beacons.

Rolleiflex400s

Walk in the sunlit woods. Waterfall Country, woodland, Brecon Beacons

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Water. A brook in the Brecon Beacons.

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Rollei pan 25 Llanthony priory

RolleiflexPan253

RolleiflexPan252

Pan251

RolleiflexPan25188a

Apr 072015
 

Back to Film

by Jay

Hi Steve!

First I want to say thank you for all the great work. Your site has been part of my daily inspiration for some time now so I thought it would only be right to make a small photographic contribution. My name is Jay Lynn and I got my start in photography as a junior in high school back in 1985.

My school had a school newspaper and if you were selected to be on the paper’s staff you got out of school three hours early everyday to sell ads to local businesses and follow-up leads on local interest stories. That was too good an opportunity for me to pass up but I had one problem. The paper had plenty of stand out writers and my writing skills were average at best. Just as I was about to resign myself to not making the staff, the faculty coordinator asked me if I had any experience with photography. I did not but I knew that my father had an old Pentax ME Super along with a few lenses that had been sitting in a bag in our basement for years. I had never so much as picked it up but I sure wasn’t about to blow my chance to get out school early.

What followed was a steep learning curve but I got the hang of it and when I got my first good roll of film back from the lab I was hooked. I went on to “upgrade” to a Nikon FG and eventually began developing my own film. My passion continued unabated throughout college until I joined the Marine Corps and became a Marine officer. After the events of 9/11 and the subsequent invasions of Iraq and Afghanistan, I just could not justify making time for photography amidst the constant training and combat deployments. Of course there were so many moments that I experienced during those deployments that would have been amazing photographs but for obvious reasons I could not even allow myself to think about that. In those environments you have to be 100% focused on the job at hand. Still, the passion never died and every time I had a photojournalist embedded with my unit I did find some time to talk photography and admire their gear and their photos.

Leica M6 with 90mm f/2.8 Elmarit M and Kodak Porta 400

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In 2011 I was assigned to the Marine Forces headquarters in the Pacific, which is located in Hawaii on the island of Oahu. For the first time in over 10 years I picked up a camera again. So much had changed with the progression of digital photography since I had last enjoyed photography but so much remained timeless. I bought a Nikon D5100 and a few lenses to get back in the game. Within six months I sold the D5100 and purchased a D7000. Ergonomically the D7000 just worked better for me and I got a lot of mileage out of that camera. Being in Hawaii affords me an opportunity travel throughout Asia and to photograph a lot of amazing landscapes. In 2013 I jumped at the chance to purchase a D600 for use with wide FX lenses and that has been my primary digital body ever since.

I love digital photography and about half of my work is digital. But as much as I enjoy the convenience of digital I really began to miss the tactile aspects of film photography and the deliberate nature associated with the process of shooting a role of film. The other thing that had changed since I took my break from photography was that all the film cameras and older lenses that I had lusted after in high school and college were now readily available for next to nothing on online auction sites or even for free in some instances. So I bought them all! Well, practically all of them. And I do love them but I noticed that I was spending more and more time shooting the old manual cameras like the FM2 or the F2 versus the more modern film cameras like the Nikon F5 or F6. I have a Mamiya 6 rangefinder that I travel with a lot and I really began to appreciate the process of using a manual focus rangefinder over the more automated cameras. You know where this is going, right? Yup, you guessed it.

Leica M4 with Zeiss 35mm f/2.8 C Biogon T* ZM and Kodak TriX 400

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In October of this past year my wife and I took a three-week backpacking trip through Vietnam. I used that trip and the need to travel lightly to justify buying two Leica film cameras, an M6 that I used primarily for color film and an M4 loaded with Kodak TriX 400. With the addition of the wonderful Zeiss 35 f/2.8 ZM and a Leica 90 f/2.8 Elmarit M, I was set. I knew that I wanted to take portraits, landscapes, and street photography while in Vietnam. I carried only the two Leicas and the Mamiya 6 for the duration of the trip and I have absolutely no regrets. This was a huge step for me because I am usually the guy who brings along the proverbial kitchen sink “just in case”.

Mamiya 6 with G 75mm f/3.5 and Kodak Portra

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Traveling with light gear that I could carry in a small, inconspicuous sling bag was such a liberating experience and I am so happy with the results. I really do believe the adage that the unobtrusive nature of the Lecias allows for more candid shots because your subject is not intimidated by a giant camera and lens combo. I also love the all manual approach that the Leica rangefinders require.

It makes me think more about what I am doing and it also makes me feel like I am more involved in the decision-making cycle that occurs before the press of the shutter button. I especially enjoy the M4 which I do not use with a meter. I practiced estimating exposure for weeks before the trip and got comfortable enough determining exposure that I never regretted not having a meter when using the M4. I am attaching just a small sample of the nearly 1000 images I made during the trip. One from each camera. Of note, I have more “keepers” from this trip than I have ever had since I began shooting film again. I have to believe that the process of using all manual film cameras has something to do with this and that this translates to digital photography as well and will ultimately make me a more discerning photographer. Enjoy the photos and keep up the great work.

Jay

© 2009-2015 STEVE HUFF PHOTOS All Rights Reserved
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