Nov 172015


LEICA SL – 1st HANDS ON Look! 

So today I received a Leica SL and 24-90 Lens along with an M adapter so I could test M lenses on this new Leica. This is a loaner that I received to test for a while as the one I ordered for myself (from Ken Hansen) will not be in for a little while. In any case, this new Leica SL is absolutely incredible in build with a pro feel that not many cameras have besides the Leica S. In fact, it feels and looks more like a Mini S but with a full frame 35mm sensor instead of a medium format sized sensor.

My 1st Look Video Below!

When you look at it from this perspective, the SL is not a Sony A7 copy..instead it is like a whole new class of camera. Leica says they are aiming for pro users, and I can see this now as any studio shooter, wedding shooter or concert shooter would fall deeply in love with the SL. Even the 24-90 f/2.8-f/4 lens is stunning in its quality from build to image quality, which renders much like a superb prime lens would.

I have to eat my words on what I wrote about the SL based on 1st thoughts of the specs and images. Now that it is in hand, and I have studied it, shot with it a little and experienced this amazing drop dead gorgeous EVF, dual SD slots, pro battery, and full weather sealing..I can say the SL is in a class all by itself, even when compared to the Canon 1d’s and D4’s of the world.

It’s larger than a Sony A7 series body but not by much. In fact, in the video you will see that it is not much larger than an M 240. With M lenses, this EVF ROCKS and makes it a breeze to shoot with M glass…much easier than even the M 240 and the IQ beats the M as well due to the new sensor.

Three quick snaps 10 minutes after getting the camera. These are just snapshots of my house, in my house and outside of my house. I wanted to see the color, detail and pop of the 24-90 Zoom. In my upcoming full review I will have TONS of image samples just as I always do for my big reviews. 

Last two are with the 50 Lux ASPH

These are all Out Of Camera images and color looks great indoor and out






Shooting the SL with something like a 28 Elmarit, 35 cron and 50 lux would be so much fun and provide stunning IQ.

My full massive review will include video samples, comparisons to the Sony A7RII, Leica M 240 and even the Sony RX1RII. It will include TONS of images samples, crops, ISO tests and usability reports. It may be my most jam packed review to date so will take around 3 weeks to do. So….

Stay tuned ;)


PS – You can order a Leica SL from Ken Hansen ([email protected]),, B&H Photo or Leica Store Miami

Nov 172015

Hong Kong with the Voigtlander Nokton 35 1.2

By Fahad A


Hi Brandon,

Thanks for posting my previous submissions, this is my 4th submission and hopefully the 5th will be on the way soon.

Last summer I decided to go to Hong Kong to spend my vacation and of course to explore the streets along with my camera. I only took the leica (typ240) along with the nokton 35mm 1.2, thinking that I might buy a 50mm from HK if I felt limited with the 35mm (given that I broke the 50mm summicron and for some reason didn’t remember to send it for a repair until the day I traveled)

Luckily, I managed without having to buy a new lens, the images had the usual nokton softness, which I don’t mind at all. Hong kong is very dense, and streets are tight and narrow that I couldn’t imagine using a 50mm over there, the 35mm focal length served me very well.

Most of the images I am sharing here are not uploaded to my photostream yet, as you can see they are all in B&W, which is the total opposite of my current flickr photostream, however I might upload them soon.

I never thought I would convert any of these photographs to B&W when i was capturing them, it only happened when I messed around with one of the images and felt that nokton softness along with B&W treatment appeals to my taste.

For now, hope you all enjoy the images as much as I enjoyed capturing them.



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Fahad A

Oct 012015


Leica is not just for Street

by Jesus

Hey Steve , love your website. I’ve sent you a few images in the past but never submitted any so here goes…

I recently had surgery for a torn adductor muscle so I’ve had time to do a little web surfing.

Funny thing most articles I’ve read  on the old inter web insist Leica rangefinders are strictly to be used as street photography instruments.

Apparently I didn’t get the memo. I’m a machinist by trade and I think that’s what drew me to the Leica M. I’ve been fortunate enough to own a dozen M bodies and 3 R bodies and around 50 lenses.


And I’ve never shot street photography.

I’m also amused by the comments that only dentist and doctors used Leica’s so here’s a few images that I’ve been fortunate enough to shoot with friends and live in muses

First Two Images

Leica M9 50 MM Asph



Amber Leica M8 75 APO



M9 50 Lux


And finally
Live in muse and friend

Leica M7
50 Lux
Agfa 100 APX


Abrazos ~ Jesus

Sep 232015


The Voigtlander 35 1.7 Ultron VM (Leica Mount) Lens Review

By Steve Huff

We are living in a GREAT  time for our hobby or our profession or our matter what you call is Photography. Today we have some pretty technologically advanced marvel cameras, simple basic cameras, amazing mid level cameras and even fantastic lower end cameras. Today we have more camera tech available at our disposal than at anytime in history. Even though the worlds #1 camera today is the iPhone, if you are reading this article then that must mean you are here because you appreciate quality and the process of photography, something you lose with an iPhone as you main camera.


Today I will be taking a look at the new Voigtlander 35 f/1.7 VM lens (Leica M Mount) but I will be shooting it on the Sony A7RII as that is now my #1 camera around here, and for me, the best full frame 35mm mirrorless camera made today. With the new backlit sensor tech, Sony has eliminated mostly all of the old issues when using wider angle Leica glass, at least the color issues ;) This lens works very well on the Sony A7RII, so every image in this review will have been shot with that camera and this lens (as well as the Zeiss ZM 35 1.4 Leica Mount for comparison).

One of my 1st shots with the lens which was indoors so not a ton of light. I opened up the lens, focused and shot. To me, the color is very good as is the OOF background rendering. Smooth rendering with a sharp subject. No issues.


When Stephen Gandy, head dude over at Cameraquest emailed me and said “The new 35 1.7’s are in, do you want to review one”? Of course I said YES YES YES! I have been curious about this lens but I wasn’t excited about it as I “assumed” it would be average. Not sure why I thought that when the Voigtlander 50 1.5 Nokton hit it out of the park with bang for the buck. That little 50 1.5 came so close to the Leica 50 Summilux at 1/4 the cost it was a no brainer for those who wanted that fast 50 rangefinder lens experience without spending $4000. You can see my review of that lens HERE, well worth a read and look if you missed it as that lens is a stunner for the money. Then again, Voigtlander has always been known to be big on “bang for the buck” but what I have noticed over the past 7 years is that each time Voigtlander releases a new lens, it seems to be notch up in quality from design, build, operation and image quality. Yep, in 2015 Voigtlander lenses are kicking some serious bootie, and the new 35 1.7 VM is no exception.

My dog Olive who is a total ham. She knows when I am taking her picture, and when I aim the camera she sits and looks, as if to pose. She also watches full TV shows, interacts with animals on TV and sleeps like a human, on her back. Odd ball dog, but here she is at f/1.7 with the new 35 VM. 2nd shot wide open again!



Over the years I have reviewed many Voigtlander lenses on these very pages. Usually on a Leica M, but these days the Sony A7 series has improved considerably since the beginning about 2 1/2 years ago. While the Leica M is a gorgeous body, camera and the ultimate in “pride of ownership”, it is expensive and many are buying the Sony’s as an alternate to the full frame M and many M owners have an A7 of some sort as a backup and extra camera to their M. Many ask me daily how these lenses do on the A7RII, so this is where I will be concentrating. Of all the Voigtlander lenses I have used, reviewed, and tested the 50 1.5 is my fave, followed by this one. While I loved many of the lenses these two recent additions are really showing what this company can do when they set their mind to it.

The Lens Arrives


When I received the lens and opened it up I saw I had been sent the CHROME version, and it looks quite a bit like the 50 1.5 I have been speaking about here. This is good as it is a retro but cool design and it is easy to focus and change your aperture. Smooth yet solid, and the lens is a joy to use. It is also thin and small which is nice. MUCH smaller than the Sony/Zeiss 35 1.4, smaller than the Zeiss 35 1.4 ZM and while not as small as the Sony 35 2.8, it is a much different type of lens.

When I attached it to the camera and took my 1st shots I was happy to see the color performance was gorgeous and the lens was pretty damn sharp wide open. It offered that “Voigtlander Look” but to me, it seemed sharper, crisper, better bokeh and color than normal. I liked it. Maybe it was the Sony but what was coming out of the camera with this lens wide open made me happy :)

Both shots below were shot wide open at f/1.7. 1st one I had some natural light coming in, the 2nd image was different. It was much dimmer here than the 1st image but the fast aperture let me get as much light in as I could. 

CLICK them for larger



As I used the lens more and more over the 2 weeks I had it, I was liking it and decided that I wanted to see how it would stand up to the Zeiss 35 1.4 ZM that comes in at $2300. The Voigtlander comes in at under $900, so it is more than 2X less than the Zeiss. I would expect the Zeiss to come out ahead but had to see for myself what an extra $1300 would buy me ;)

Zeiss vs Voigtlander

The Voigtlander 35 1.7 next to the Zeiss 35 1.4 ZM


Below are some images comparing both the Zeiss 35 1.4 ZM and  the Voigtlander 35 1.7 VM, both Leica M mount and mounted to my A7RII with the Voigtlander close focus M adapter.

Click the images to see larger and full 100% crops. These are right from the camera with no tweaks at all. FROM RAW.

1st one is the Voigtlander, 2nd is the Zeiss. 



For this set the Zeiss is showing a tad more color pop and sharpness in the crop (click them for full crop)



At the end of the day, the Zeiss is a tad better for sharpness at 1.7 but I prefer the bokeh of the Voigtlander which also seems to be giving a more shallow DOF than the Zeiss wen using the same aperture. Very odd but I have seen this before with different lens brands. I love the Zeiss, and it’s about as good as it gets in a 35mm for Leica M mount (it has been compared favorably to the Leica 35 Summilux that comes in at $5500). The Voigtlander is really only a teeny but behind in sharpness wide open. Both are fantastic but one is $1300 less expensive and smaller. Hmmmm.

The Voigtlander also focuses closer than the Zeiss. 

Ultimately it is up to the user which one is preferred, if any. In the world of 35mm for Leica we have many choices from old to modern. For Sony FE we have a load of lenses as well that can be used, so they should be chosen like an artist would choose his brush or pencil. Choose the lens for the desired “look” or “character” of what you want to see in your final image. This lens will give you a creamy look with you subject popping from a 3D background when shot wide open. Just like a good fast 35 should do. It has a decent background blur (Bokeh) rendering and I find it quite pleasing, even better than the Zeiss. It is small, well made (feels leica-ish) and gorgeous in black or chrome. Can’t go wrong.

#1, mailbox at f/1.7. #2, Hula Hoopers at The Duce. #3, Mailbox up close (and the top is OOF due to the depth of field being so shallow, not a lens issue)




ONE MORE BIG COMPARISON – “Against all the others”

Left to right: Sony/Zeiss 35 1.4 Distagon, Zeiss Loxia 35 f/2, Zeiss 35 1.4 ZM, Voigtlander 35 1.7 VM and the Sony/Zeiss 35 2.8


Many have asked me just this morning to add a quick comparison to the Sony 35 1.4, Loxia 35, and Sony 35 2.8 in addition to the Zeiss 35 1.4 ZM. Well, see the image above for the size differences, and see below for the image samples with each lens! Your wish is my command! (sometimes, lol).

I am using the Sony A7s for  this one and below are full size images from camera (RAW) without any modifications. What I am looking at  here is sharpness of the subject (face of the bottle) and the Bokeh (background blur quality) as well as the color performance. What do YOU think? Leave a comment and let me know! For me, the ultimate IQ comes from the Sony/Zeiss 35 1.4 but it is huge. The 2nd fave of mine is now the Voigtlander, then the Loxia, then the Zeiss 35 1.4 ZM and then the 2.8.






So there ya go ;) Let me know in the comments which rendering you prefer. 


No wide angle lens will be perfect on the Sony A7 series, even the RII. While the A7RII has improved considerably with M lenses, there is still one issue that seems to remain. SOFT edges with some lenses. Instead of magenta side we now will be left with soft sides on many occasions. THIS only comes into play if you are stopped down and wanting perfect corner to corner sharpness. ON the Leica M it will work well, on the Sony not so much.

If you shoot this lens wide open you will never see it. That is where the character lies in this lens anyway. Stopping it down to f/8 will give you no better quality than almost any other 35mm that will fit on the Sony. For me it is a non issue, but for many they want that stopped down corner to corner performance. If that is the case, and you shoot with a Sony A7 series camera, I highly recommend the Sony 35 1.4 which is STUNNING but HUGE. See that review HERE.

You will also see some slight vignetting with this lens when wide open on the Sony A7RII or A7s or A7II, but you will also get that with the Zeiss 35 1.4 ZM on the Sony. You will also get the slight vignetting wide open when using it on the Leica M.

If you want perfection in 35mm, buy either a Leica M and a Leica 35 Summilux FLE or buy an A7RII and the Sony/Zeiss 35 1.4 Distagon. Both of those will offer you about the best 35mm performance you will see in full frame, no matter the type of camera. If you want a fun unique lens that also comes with a very cool and fun user experience of using an all manual lens all while getting massive character and IQ, take a look at the Voigtlander. I love it just as much as I do the 50 1.5 Nokton. I highly recommend it for Leica M or A7RII shooters!!! 




You can buy this lens at Cameraquest HERE. Best prices, and free filter and overnight shipping.  

They are the official USA distributor for Voigtlander and top notch all the way!! 




Hello to all! For the past 7 years I have been running this website and it has grown to beyond my wildest dreams. Some days this very website has over 200,000 visitors and because of this I need and use superfast dedicated web servers to host the site. Running this site costs quite a bit of cash every single month and on top of that, I work full-time 60+ hours a week on it each and every single day of the week (I received 200-300 emails a DAY). Because of this, I need YOUR help to cover my costs for this free information that is provided on a daily basis.

To help out it is simple, and no, I am not asking you for a penny!

If you ever decide to make a purchase from B&H Photo or Amazon, for ANYTHING, even can help me without spending a penny to do so. If you use my links to make your purchase (when you click a link here and it takes you to B&H or Amazon, that is using my links as once there you can buy anything and I will get a teeny small credit) you will in turn be helping this site to keep on going and keep on growing.

Not only do I spend money on fast hosting but I also spend it on cameras to buy to review, lenses to review, bags to review, gas and travel, and a slew of other things. You would be amazed at what it costs me just to maintain this website, in money and time. Many times I give away these items in contests to help give back you all of YOU.

So all I ask is that if you find the free info on this website useful AND you ever need to make a purchase at B&H Photo or Amazon, just use the links below. You can even bookmark the Amazon link and use it anytime you buy something. It costs you nothing extra but will provide me and this site with a dollar or two to keep on trucking along.

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Aug 242015

Leica M: Not perfect, but I love it.

By Steven Jermaine

Hey Brandon and Steve, first thank you for keeping up all the hard work over the years. It’s been a pleasure to read and see the growth. Over the years GAS has led me to and through many cameras, such as the fuji x100, sony nex 7, sony rx1, nikon df, Leica m8, canon 70d, and etc But with the blessing of my wife my GAS was abated with the purchase of a Leica M240 and Zeis 50mm f2 lens. It’s my daily camera and goes with me everywhere. I purchased mine certified used from and verified the two-year warranty with Leica NJ.

This camera I am sure everyone knows is amazing so I won’t have to go there. And yet, I am sure everyone knows it has its issues and as a person who has experienced it, I’ll touch on it a little. This camera has been sent to NJ for repair early this year for two months. That wasn’t a fun time as the rangefinder was out of alignment amongst other things. I purchased a Sony A6000 to hold me over (Great little camera).






Despite the issues I find myself still in love from day one. The camera inspires me to take it out everyday and attempt to create something. Some days I don’t make any images while others I shoot a whole lot. But it’s always with me and like you always say, that’s should be the camera you own.

Ok this is getting a little long but as for the images, these are test shoots and my daily musings around Washington D.C. I hope you enjoy them. Thank you everyone for your time. If you’re in D.C. and want to photo-walk around, don’t hesitate to email or dm on Instagram. I’m always looking for photo friends.


Steven Jermaine

Jul 272015

Bali with the Leica Safari kit and the Noctilux

by Aditya Agarwal

Hi Steve,

This is my third post to your excellent and very useful website. I am submitting todays report not just to show my work but also as a thanks for all the reviews and articles which benefited me a lot. (THANK YOU Aditya! – Steve)

I visited Bali in June 2015 with my family. While packing for the vacation, I came around the idea to carry just my Leica Safari along with the 35/Summicron and 50/Noctilux. I have the Sony A7II on which I use the Leica lenses regularly, but I wanted this trip to be a test. A test for finding out if the Leica can be my only travel camera against the Sony with all its bells and whistles. I feared that I will miss out on the more advanced technical features of the Sony. It was a tough choice, but I kept to it. After 7 days in Bali, the results were nothing short of fantastic and moreover strengthened my faith in the Leica system.

Mount Batur – The active Volcao at Bali – Shot from the flight.
Leica Safari, 50mm Noctilux, f/8, ISO 200, 1/1000


The Egg painter. Shot at an art gallery at Ubud, Bali
Leica Safari, 50mm Noctilux, f/0.95, ISO 200, 1/500


Uluwatu, Bali. the other side of the temple. HDR
Leica Safari, 35mm Summicron, f/13, ISO 200, 5 Shot HDR


I am taking the liberty of including a fourth picture. This was shot at the Uluwatu Temple where a Kecak Dance is held every evening. I was worried that I won’t get any shots in focus as the dance is quite fast paced. Not only did I nail the focus, I took shot at f1.8 with the Nocti. It was a awesome feeling.

Kecak Dance at the Uluwatu Temple
Leica Safari, 50mm Noctilux, f/1.8, ISO 1250, 1/90


I am now pretty convinced that this is my go to camera setup for almost every shoot. I do plan to upgrade to the Sony A7RII mainly for landscape photography.

Once again, thank you for igniting my interest in mirrorless cameras through your wonderful site. My work is viewable on


Aditya Agarwal


Jul 202015

READER QUICK SHOT: Leica M240 and 50 Noctilux

by Tom Woods

From Steve: This “Quick Shot” will be a new series much like the daily inspiration but with ONE SHOT only. If you have ONE SHOT that you love, send it to me with a description of the shot, what you used to take the image and why you like it. I may post it as a “Quick Shot”! Send to me at [email protected]

Dear Steve:

For your consideration, here’s one shot that I like, probably more than any other.

Shown are my neighbors Dick and Kathy Ralston in their hot tub. This photo was taken one week after Kathy was diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer. Dick and Kathy asked me to take this photo before Kathy started chemotherapy and her hair fell out.

December 2014 4-1003475

Details: Leica M240 + 50mm 0.95 Noctilux.

Thanks, Steve, and please keep up the good work. I love your posts and articles.

Tom Woods

Jul 082015

The crazy colorful world of the LOMO LC-A Art lens

by Huss Hardan

Hello Huffsters!

Brad Husick wrote a nice initial impression piece on the new LOMO LC-A Art lens. A pancake lens, rangefinder coupled for M mount cameras. Which also means that with adapters it can be used on almost anything.

It’s the cheapest, new with full warranty (2 years) M lens currently available. The parts come from Russia (nothing like your Nikon D610), and the bits are assembled in China (just like your Nikon D610).




Anyway, enough of the small talk. What’s it like? Well….it’s meant for use on film cameras which is what I really bought it for – to use on a Leica MDa (a Leica M4 without a rangefinder or viewfinder). So on a digital Leica like my M it will smear in the corners just like any wide-angle non Leica manufactured lens (think most Cosina Voigtlanders). It will give wild colour casts and deep saturations. It will give sharp results in the center, not so much away from it. It will give some hefty barrel distortion.





Much of this – the colour casts, the distortion – can be fixed post. But that defeats the purpose of this lens, as if you are going to do that you will just be left with a mediocre boring lens. Instead of a mediocre interesting lens!

It is the flaws that what make it, and so should be embraced. Otherwise shop elsewhere.

Of note: In the images here I did not boost colour saturation. This is what the lens does. I also noticed that I had to increase exposure by one stop in auto mode on the M.










All images were taken the day I got the lens, down the street from my gallery – – in San Pedro, CA. Come visit us, it’s lovely!

Peace out


May 232015
Screen Shot 2015-05-23 at 4.09.53 PM

Screen Shot 2015-05-23 at 4.09.53 PM

The Leica M 60 Special Edition. Now $2200 OFF!

THE LEICA M60 – $2200 OFF. Now $16,280 with the special stainless steel 35 1.4 Summilux FLE. Previous price was $18,500. So if you have been lusting after this one of a kind digital M 240 without an LCD, without any special modes, without a JPEG mode, and with a unique design, NOW is the time to get one. Yes, it’s a bank account buster but there are many out there that want this (I know, I spoke with quite a few of you). It will not get any cheaper than this for a new in box M60 edition!

Buy it HERE at B&H Photo. 

“Blending a minimalist approach to digital imaging, the Edition “Leica 60″ of the Leica M (Typ 240) is a digital full-frame rangefinder camera designed with an emphasis on the four basic elements of photography: shutter speed, aperture, ISO, and focus. With each of these controls manually adjustable, the Edition 60 omits digitally-conventional elements of design for a pared-down approach to shooting. No rear LCD monitor and no menu system avail a clear and direct method of working, with the only means of recording being an uncompressed DNG raw still image file. Offered in a special limited edition of only 600 units, and paired with a unique Summilux-M 35mm f/1.4 ASPH lens, custom camera cover, and a handmade presentation box, the Leica Edition 60 serves as an apt summation of the founding principles of the Leica M system, and the basic elements of photography as well.”

Apr 302015


Angelo Pelle Cases for the M 240 and Sony A7II (Video)

After acquiring a Leica Safari M 240 set I went to the website of Angelo Pelle to see what he had to offer in the form of a half case for the green Safari. I knew I wanted something different, something unique and something besides the usual black or brown half case as the Leica Safari is a sort of Army Green color. After perusing his website for a while, and after owning a fantastic brown leather half case for my Sony A7II that Angelo made, I found the half case AND bag that I wanted from him for my Safari M.


See the video below to see the case and bag

I decided to order his “Henri Bag” which is a small design that will hold your Leica and small lens as well as one more lens to bring along, and that is about it. I asked for BOTH in Camo color (though if I could go back I would get the case in CAMO and the bag in Black) and in less than 2 weeks I had the custom set at my door. I have had my share of half cases for Leica M cameras. Gariz, Arte Di Mano, Luigi,  Artisan & Artist, Leica’s own cases and a few cheap options that all fit loose and sloppy. I always have said “you get what you pay for” and this holds true with half cases for the Leica M. Usually.



The best fit cases I have tried until now have been the Arte Di Mano line, but man are they expensive. (then again, so is a Leica M). Luigi cases are gorgeous as well but a tad on the thick side and Leica’s own cases are the worst of the lot with sloppy fits and odd designs.

As for Angelo Pelle, his cases are right up there at the top when it comes to quality, design, fit and finish. When I received my Camo case for the Safari I was stunned at the quality of Leather used as well as the “fit like a glove” design. It offers nearly full protection for the camera, most I have seen for a half case as it come all the way up to the top and even covers pretty much all of the rear bottom, top and sides. There is even a flap to cover the LCD if you want to do that. I have been shooting the M like this, and it is pretty cool to ignore the LCD!




Angelo’s products are top notch, best rating I can give. He is a friendly guy, offers unique options and all products of his are hand made in Italy. They fit perfect and feel fantastic. The Leica case has a built in grip that allows a nice feel, and this really takes it up a notch as well.

His cases are not cheap, but they are not the most expensive either. I find them to be the best I have used, and for quality Leica leather cases, price in the upper middle of the range. Less expensive than Art De Mano and Luigi and well worth the cost IF you are looking for a high quality beautiful case to protect your camera and give it a nicer feel when you are using it.

You can see Angelo’s website HERE. He has quite a it to offer and makes cases for many cameras. My Angelo Pelle Sony A7II case is superb, amazing. It is wearing in nicely as well. The only weaknesses I found with these cases is that once they are on you lose access to the battery and memory card until you take the case off. This is how 99% of cases are though. Me I shoot all day, come home and then take the case off once to get my card and battery. No problem.

Apr 022015

There is no “I” in Team

by John Tuckey

Team Efforts

I wouldn’t advise anyone to overload a shoot with unnecessary bodies. The fewer people cluttering your space, the better. The less people to organise the better. It’s an absolute if you’re trying to create a sense of intimacy or intrigue and a simple practicality when you’re working to a budget or a tight time scale as most of us are. But ‘one man and his lens’ is not always enough – indeed, modern professional work is hardly ever created so. It’s a creative collaboration between the photographer, an art director, a stylist, a make up artist, a hair stylist, a lighting technician and possibly a set dresser. That amazing image in magazine ‘X’ is usually the result of a tight team who have a good working dynamic – not ‘one man and his lens’.

If you’re thinking about crossing this river and working your shots with a team it can be daunting at first. My advice is to keep it simple and pick your team carefully, don’t waste your resources and know who you can and can’t live without. I get my moments, but I’m still no pro – so I won’t worry about an assistant until i try a complicated location set-up. And a stylist isn’t even on my list unless I get involved in a commercial fashion shoot and the client specifically requests one – and even then they will probably be chosen by the art director.

So I’d suggest that for an amateur or hobbyist, the bodies to make sure you have covered on a model orientated shoot are the make up artist and the hair stylist. Sometimes the model can cover this off herself, but indispensable doesn’t even come close to describing the best I’ve worked with. And without even thinking I can give you three very good reasons why they’re always worth stretching the budget for.


A skilled makeup artist can simply transform a face. Try these two of Emily, one with ‘normal’ self done makeup and the Next from a Make Up artist.



The Devil is in the Detail

Much of my work revolves around vintage themes. Having the right make up or a particular hair style makes the world of difference. In these portraits of Olivia, the lighting may well have achieved the look on its own, but the work of the hair stylist in those thirties style fingerwaves added the polish – making the vintage feel of the final image effortless and complete.




Tricks, Shortcuts and FX

These Lonsdale shots aren’t just about beauty and boxing, but also strength, character and control. The make up artist on this shoot pulled the FX off with ease: Jammy the model was engaged with the concept and we got some great shots as a result.




Saving Time in Post

Doesn’t digital mean make up artists are a waste of money? If you don’t think of the hours you’ll spend in post-production as money, then I’ll grant you that a hair or make up artist might not be your best use of budget. But I’d rather get it right for real on the day and trade that time in front of a screen for more time with a camera thanks – a good MUA allows that.

If you are interested in my images or my workshops you can follow me on facebook at http://www.facebook/jrtvintage, on twitter where I’m @jrtvintage, at my own site at or on my gallery page at Saatchi Art


Models: Emily, Olivia Harriett, and Jammy Lou

Emily and Jammys Make Up: James Minahan

Olivia’s Hair: Le Keux Salon
Best regards

John Tuckey

Mar 272015

One Camera, One Lens and One Faraway Destination

By Fahad A

Hey Brandon,

Thank you for featuring my previous post I shared earlier this year.

Last summer I decided to go on a quick vacation somewhere far, somewhere I have never been before or even thought about visiting. Looked up the map, found Korea to be distant, far, interesting and not top of mind destination for someone who wants to roam around and take pictures.

Without any preconceptions about South Korea, I took a plane to Seoul, accompanied with a small suitcase that barely carries a couple of shirts, and a backpack that for my laptop and camera.

Few hours before the flight, I had a quick debate with myself about which gear should I take along with my Leica M + Summicron 50mm (V4), should i take the tiny Fuji 100s ? or should I take along the Nokton 35mm 1.2.

I decided to keep both Fuji and Nokton lens at home. went to Seoul with only one camera, and one lens! which means I’m stuck with 50mm focal length for the entire trip.

Did I regret it? I don’t think so. I enjoyed the limitation of only one lens. and how I should adapt with the focal length rather than replacing it or take out another camera with a different lens whenever I need to.

I might have missed few shots that were easier with a wider lens, however I’d sacrifice them anytime for the experience I got from limiting myself to 50mm.

Fahad A

For the full set, please take a look here:


L1002531  2  sss






L1002994 SS












Mar 202015

Battle of the Champions. Part 2. The Leica 50 APO.

by Brad Husick 

See Part 1 HERE.

At the request of several readers, I have conducted some new tests using the Leica 50mm APO Summicron f/2 lens on three camera bodies: the Sony A7II using the Voigtlander VM-E Close Focus Adapter, the Leica M240 and the Leica Monochrom.

All these are shot RAW, wide open at f/2 and indoor shots are at ISO 1600, outdoor at ISO 200. All other camera settings were left on AUTO (WB, exposure, etc.)

The photos in this series are taken from the same positions in the same composition as the previous “Battle of the Image Champions” article, so I won’t include the full frames here again. These are all 100% crops and are labeled with the camera used. The indoor lighting matches the previous series. The outdoor conditions were overcast today, no wind.

The comparisons that include the Monochrom use a simple 100% desaturation in Lightroom rather than a more ideal black and white conversion that I would use if these were meant to be shown or printed for their artistic qualities. Again, these are not meant to highlight my skills as a photographer but rather to show the differences between cameras using the same high quality lens.

Enjoy and good shooting. -Brad


mono-m240 lake

mono-sony lake

sony-m240 lake desat

m240 mono corner

sony-mono desat corner

m240-mono edge

sony-mono desat edge


sony-m240 troll

sony-m240 troll desat
sony-mono troll


sony-m240 palm

Feb 202015

Pre-Order the Leica M-P 240 “Safari” Edition

Leica is at it again and this time they have created a special edition Leica M-P Type 240 giving it the Safari treatment! I remember the M8.2 Safari Edition and today we have the latest and greatest M in the famous Olive color. This one comes with a 35 Summicron lens with round hood, a genuine leather strap and even a leather SD card holder. This is a limited run and will set you back a cool $10,000 or $1000 LESS than a standard M 240 and 35 cron, and you do not even get the extras with the standard version. So this is actually a bit of a ‘deal’ for a unique M 240.

Again, Normal price of a Leica M-P 240 and 35 cron? $11,000! So for this SE set you are saving $1000 and getting extras such as the strap, wallet for your SD cards and the unique round hood for the 35 Summicron. Not bad as usually these special editions are coming in at $2-$4k MORE than the standard pricing.


10933 10933-2

From the website:

Leica Camera presents the Leica M-P Set ‘SAFARI’. This set comprises of the Leica M-P (Typ 240) Safari edition, Leica Summicron-M 35mm/f2 ASPH with round metal lens hood, a full grain cowhide carrying strap and matching SD & business card holder.

Leica’s safari/olive edition cameras date back to 1960 with the Leica M1 ‘Olive‘. Made initially for the military, the safari/olive cameras’ unique color stands out. Over the years, a handful of safari/olive editions were produced. Many of these limited edition cameras are highly prized collectibles.

The Leica M-P Set ‘SAFARI’ has an olive lacquered top cover, leatherette and bottom plate. The shutter speed dial, the On/Off switch, the release button, the hot shoe and some other details have a silver finish. The engraving on the top cover is reminiscent of the first safari camera in 1960 and has the classic Leica logo inscribed on one line and the wording ‘WETZLAR GERMANY’ on the second line. The 35mm/f2 ASPH has a silver chrome finish with a matching classic round metal lens hood. This set comes in a new packaging including a presentation box.

For the record, used M8.2 Safari kits go for anywhere between $7-$9k, and it also sold for $10k when new. So if you buy this, use it for several years you may only lose $1-$2k when and if you ever sell it. Not bad for 5 years of use. That is the lowest depreciation I have seen with any digital camera gear.


You can preorder the new M-P 240 Safari Set at HERE. 

You can also order it though Ken Hansen ([email protected]), The Pro Shop, or Leica Store Miami. 

There will only be 1500 sets made.

Feb 202015

Friday Film: Making a Case for the Voigtlander Bessa

By Michael McFaul

Hi Steve!

Wanted to share a post on my views of this wonderful little camera.

With the purchase of the Bessa in early summer of last year, I’ve had several months to put it through its paces. It has gone through about 4 dozen rolls of film, family trips, two different lenses, the occasional groans of angst and the multiple feelings of joy. Yet, I still love this camera.


My positive experiences with the Bessa has led me to purchase of the Voigtlander 21mm f/4 and a soon to be purchased 75mm f/2.5. One main positive is the camera’s heft. It is just a solid, dense camera; coming in at a clean 1lb. And yet if one were to look at stock photos of the Bessa on camera sites, it would come across as cheap and plastic-y via the stock image. Not at all. The body is solid metal with the film spool, shutter button and advance crank being the only items that are plastic. I think. Nonetheless, outside of the occasional battery change, this camera will last you for many years.


Another positive is the camera’s ergonomics, it just fits into the palm, thumb, and fingers of my hand. The raised rubber grip on the back of the camera works comfortably with the palm of my hand, allowing the thumb to rest against the grip. Initially, the placement of the strap lugs were of an annoyance, yet after several uses, you realize the importance of its location; for it allows you to place your index finger on the trigger, with the lugs between your index and remaining three fingers, allowing them to wrap nicely around the camera’s body. However, the positioning of the lugs slightly below the top plate of the camera means it faces slightly skyward when hung from the straps around your neck.


I will say that the camera’s 1:1 finder ratio really is fantastic. It’s bright, big and clear. Yet when it comes to shooting with 40mm lens, I tend to wear contacts. The 40 frame lines within the finder are inconveniently tucked into the upper corners of the viewfinder. And if your strictly a glasses wearer, you’ll have a difficult time framing your image for you’ll find yourself having to poke your eye up/down, left/right to get correct composition. Non glasses wearers, no problem. But I will say that tucked within the 40 lines is a 90 as well, and it really acts as a helpful composing tool; it’s perfectly centered with the 40. Additionally, if you’re primarily a 50mm shooter with a stock pile of Leica, Zeiss, Jupiter, Canon or Voigtlander lenses, this camera is for you. I can’t recommend it enough. You’ll be given the 50 frame lines, nice and clean with no 75 or 90 squeezed within it. And whether you wear glasses or not, you’ll be able to see the 50 lines through the viewfinder. Plus it’s obviously much larger than 0.72/0.85 finders from Leica. Just for this reason alone, I’m considering the sale of my 40/1.4 to help fund the purchase of a Zeiss 50/1.5 Sonnar. I want that ‘classic’ Zeiss ‘3D’ pop! :)


Anyhow, if there’s one thing that’s still taking some getting used to, it’s the camera’s metering. I’ll admit a lot of it is user error, too. Upon further research, I’m learning that it’s a rangefinder thing as well. Previously I shot a lot in AE mode and felt I was getting 7 to 8 frames per 36 roll over exposed. Lately, to the benefit of me and learning, I’ve mainly been shooting in manual. Even then, as a predominantly b&w shooter, I’m learning to meter for the grey/mid tones within the scene and I’m having a lot more success.


Some of the photos enclosed are from Ilford HP5 pushed to 800 and Tri-X at box speed. I believe every image was done with a B+W yellow/orange filter, too…which I highly recommend. It helps cut through haze, sharpen the image, give a bit more contrast, darken the sky, and lighten the skin tone for portraits. Plus, it acts as a ND filter with a 2 stop exposure comp…especially helpful with any Leica film M and their 1/1000th top speed. Which by the way, is another positive of the Bessa, it’s 1/2000th top shutter speed. I have developed a few rolls in the past myself with Ilford DD-X, but I own a terrible scanner (along with a general knack for being impatient) and have an overall distrust of pharmacy photo departments. All these shots were developed and scanned through a company called Indie Film Lab. It’s pricey, but for special occasions, it’s worth it. There is also a lab called Little Film Lab that’ll scan your already developed negatives on their high-end scanners at a reasonable price, which is where I send my developed b&w rolls.


For those that enjoy shooting at a 50mm focal length, along with a collection of 50mm lenses and enjoy shooting film…I’d certainly give this camera consideration. For others that have never really forayed into film and looking to experience a rangefinder…I’d give this camera consideration. If anything else, this camera has temporarily shutdown my GAS and constant research for new cameras. The Oly EM5 is somewhat collecting dust on the shelf (love this camera and its color output), but it’s not going to be replaced anytime soon with the EM5 Mark II.


That’s the short and sweet of it.




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