Sep 302014
 

A year with rangefinder camera 

By John Kurniawan

Dear Steve and Brandon,

Glad to see both of you doing great and happy as ever!

Appreciate that you post my report on Tibet a couple of months back and this is my anniversary flash back with a rangefinder. This is a flash back from a DSLR casual photographer to an enthusiast rangefinder photographer. My first 4 weeks full of disappointment from everything auto to almost everything manual (as was using A mode), from forgetting to take off the lens caps, mis-focus to wrong metering. Now I will take out the lens cap most of the time with the power ON, preset ISO, Aperture mode or manual, set focus distance to around 2-3 meter, see something interesting just take up the cam and click for street shot and do focusing for something static.

Here a few of my works during this past one year, am still learning to take better picture with this lovely M9 which now accompany me every where I go with 1 cam 1 lens policy. For a year 95% of the time use 35mm lens (35% with Summicron and rest with Summilux FLE) and lately trying out 21mm Elmarit F2.8 and settle with SEM F3.4 There is room to improve my works, so critic for improvement are welcome

Cheers,

John Kurniawan

Photo series :

 OldMonk

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 Nannie

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 Gondola

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 Delman

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 Silent

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 LovingParent

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 Lovers

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 SealwithaKiss

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 SoSweet

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DontShot

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 SunBathing

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 Golfers

Golfers_SEM21

Sep 262014
 

Pahoa Lava Flow

By Tom Niblick

Every year my wife and I close our studio for a week or two and go to the Big Island (Hawaii) to house-sit a friends cabin while he visits friends and family on the mainland. Our friend’s home is about halfway up the slope of Kilauea, the world’s most active volcano. The cabin had just survived Hurricane Iselle last month with only one casualty, an albizia tree. He was lucky. A few miles away Iselle cut a swath through the forest downing countless thousands of trees, power lines and closing roads, leaving the Puna district (southeast) without power and water for several weeks.

A second natural disaster is slowly creeping down the volcano and in less than two weeks will sweep across the main highway and isolate thousands of homes and farms. The Puu Oo lava flow, which started on June 27th, has moved towards the sea at a rate of 250 – 400 yards every day. We could not see the hot lava while we were visiting Puna because the lava was moving through inaccessible forest land and near access was blocked to all but local traffic. All we could see was smoke in the distance. All of this has changed two days later, as the lava has enter the Kaohe Homesteads subdivision, putting countless homes in danger.

Around September 24th as the lava will cross highway 130 and, unless the flow changes direction, will probably destroy the town of Pahoa. This has happened before when a similar lava flow closed the highway at Kalapana, burning homes and isolating hundreds of residents. The current flow promises to be even more dramatic.

The town of Pahoa is a charming place with several nice restaurants, coffee houses and markets. Inhabited by young and old hippies, it is a tropical paradise where nature’s children go to escape civilization and live a simpler life. Land was (and still is) inexpensive and living off the grid is common. However, there is a reason why one can buy land in paradise for less than $10,000 per acre – lava. Black lava is only a few inches beneath the surface with a sprinkling of moss and decayed forest litter for covering. The subsurface lava is also why so many trees went down in the hurricane, the tree roots were close to the surface and with no dirt to hold them down, tipped over in the wind.

Nothing is being done to divert the flow as native Hawaiians consider this disrespectful to Pele, the volcano goddess. In fact they are all busy cleaning their homes and cutting their lawns in preparation for “a very important guest.” Doing these simple tasks often spares houses and property. We took a day and did the same. Our friend’s house is now clean, cut and ready for Madam Pele, should she decide to shift her flow.

Should anyone want to see this once-in-a-generation event, they should get to Hawaii soon. Once the lava closes the highway, only local traffic will be permitted on the dirt road by-pass now being plowed. Even this emergency road lies between the lava and the sea. Disaster is inevitable. It may be many years before the flow stops and this corner of the island becomes accessible. Rooms and lodging will be scarce in Hilo which is about an hour’s drive from Pahoa. Arnotts is an affordable combo hostel, camp and lodge. A real treat would be to stay at the Volcano House inside the National Park. Bring a tripod if you want to shoot the lava at night and good shoes!

We would have loved to stay to witness this once-in-a-generation event but had a backlog of studio work and our own house sitter had other engagements. Ten days was all we could spare.

Of yes, I used my ever-present Leica M9 with 21 SEM, 35 type IV Summicron and 50 Summicron (Tiger Claw) lenses while Debbie, my wife, used her favorite camera, an Olympus OMD E-M1 with 12-40 and 60 macro Olympus lenses. She loves her little camera!
Photos:

1) Debbie shooting what is left of a bromeliad garden after host tree was uprooted in hurricane. Leica M9 with 35 Summicron.

1 Debbie
2) Bromeliad. Olympus OMD E-M1 with 60 Macro.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
3) Roads are closed except for local access. Leica M9 with 35 Summicron.

3 Road Closed
4) Lava is burning the forest about 1 mile from road. Leica M9 with 35 Summicron.

4 Lavainforest
5) Pele’s Kitchen in Pahoa. It is considered bad luck to name a business after Pele. Leica M9 with 35 Summicron.

5 Pahoa
6) Kaleo’s Restaurant in Pahoa. Leica M9 with 35 Summicron.

6 Pahoa
7) Kalapana Lava Flow. There was a road here once upon a time. Olympus OMD E-M1 with 12-40 zoom.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
8) Kilauea Iki Trail. This 4.5 mile hike takes you across a hardened lava lake which is still steaming from the 1959 eruption. Leica M9 with 21 SEM.

8 Kilauea Iki Trail
9) Kilauea Iki Crater. Ohia tree and ferns dot the crater. Leica M9 with 21 SEM.

9 Kilauea Iki Crater
10) Land for sale… cheap! Leica M9 with 35 Summicron.

10 Land4sale

Aug 252014
 

Dear Steve,

Father’s Day just recently passed in Brazil. As past year I’m writing to you on this date, and as past year I’m sending to you a few pictures of my inspiration, my precious daughter. I realized that I never had sent pictures in color to you. Just because I don’t get so many that way — a good composition in color is harder to do, at least for me. So this time may I share some few, in color.

Dear Brandon,
Be proud of your dad I’m absolutely sure he’s proud of you — working so close to him, and following his steps — it’s a dream for any father that comes true.

Dear Both,
If you do will it would be a pleasure to see these few posted like an inspiration that might inspire. I’ll be glad and proud, she either.

My best wishes, in color. And happy father’s day,

Luiz Paulo

PS > Don’t know if this is important (the exif data) — I keep shooting with my old M9, and keep enjoying it…

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Aug 122014
 

Traveling in France with My Leica

By John Ferebee

Bonjour Brandon and Steve!

After planning and saving for a couple of years I was able to travel to France for 10 days in July. I wanted to travel light with no checked baggage. The summer weather made clothes selection pretty easy. No checked baggage wasn’t an issue of cost but one of convenience. Once arriving at De Gaulle you’re traveling isn’t over. There are several ways to get into Paris and they all involve long walks to taxi stands, the train station, or shuttle. One rolling bag makes it easier. If you plan to leave Paris and travel by train to other parts of France one bag is also much easier.

The harder decision was what photo equipment to take. Point and shoot, 35MM film, medium format film, digital full frame, lenses, filters, etc. I guess we all go through that unless it’s a driving trip. That one is easy – everything goes. I have read Steve advising “one camera one lens” and as hard as it was I almost did that. I even left the tripod home knowing that there would be some shots missed.

After thinking it over, my kit was a 21MM Super Elmar, Leica M6, M9 for Paris, Normandy, and the Loire Valley. Although there were times when I wished I had this or that, it worked out just fine. I chose the Super Elmar because I was interested in landscapes and the wide-angle would work well with streets, bridges, rivers, valleys, and the beaches in Normandy. The quality of the lens is so good I could crop if I needed a close up. Being able to use one lens with both cameras was another factor.

I experienced several rainy days and used the M6 with TriX for B&W and I didn’t worry as much about getting it wet. Some might want to know about a wide-angle view finder. I don’t have one but if you use the 21MM regularly you don’t really need it. One of the nicer things about this simple kit, or one like it, is you see more of the country because your head isn’t in your camera bag all the time. I did learn a few things. I’m going to buy a light-weight travel tripod that will fit into a carry-on bag. The Seine River at first light, Paris streets at night, and Chateaus along on the river Cher cried out for long exposures. That being said, there are creative ways to deal with low light. Increasing the ISO is the obvious one but you can use all kinds of things to stabilize your camera like chairs, window sills, lamp posts, and car hoods for example.

I took four 8G Raw Steel SD’s for the M9 and rotated them during the trip but I wish I’d taken my MacBook Air. I could have done some basic editing, weeding out, and labeling of photos during down times on the trains, hotels, and the 14 hour plane ride home. It would have saved a lot of time after my return from France. The Air would have fit in a slightly larger bag. I took the Think Tank Mirrorless Mover 30i and it held cameras, lens, film, batteries, passport, tickets, kindle, iPhone, chargers, and adapter plug (don’t forget one of those) but it wasn’t big enough for the laptop.

Here are a few photos with brief commentaries from the three areas I visited.

Eiffel Tower in the rain. Lightroom spot remover took care of all the drops.

Eiffel Tower in the Clouds (1 of 1)

The Arc at Night. Used a light pole for stabilization.

Night Arc (1 of 1)

The Red Hat. Took a few street shots but it isn’t my thing but Paris is a terrific place for it

2014-07-03-16 France-83-Edit-Edit

Loire Valley Morning. Camera was on the window sill of our room using the timer

Loire Vally Morning (1 of 1)

Rue St. Jean in Bayeux. Set the camera on the street and used the timer

Rue St Jean Bayeux (1 of 1)

Loire Valley countryside

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Omaha Beach monument honoring soldiers who pulled wounded to safety

Omaha Beach Monument (1 of 1)

The American Cemetery honors 9,387 and is impeccably maintained

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If any of your readers have an interest in seeing other photos from France they can visit My Photo Site

Thank you!

John Ferebee

Jul 272014
 

Black and White Storytelling

by Ben Miller

Steve and Brandon,

I think that all photographers are searching for the perfect camera and a photographic style that they can call their own.

My main focus in photography is black and white storytelling. I find that the sum of several photographs which tells a story can be greater than one just one perfect image. I have found the gear that best suits my focus. In my bag is a Leica M9 and an Olympus OM-D E-M5. Both of these systems allow me to get close to people without being obtrusive. I believe in prime lenses and do not own any zooms.

I recently was commissioned to shoot an event with my M9 and E-M5. During the gathering I was pulled away and asked to join a few gentlemen in the parking lot. I wrote the following story to accompany the captures of what occurred:

 

At every party there is a secret party.

One that only few know about and are invited to.

I was lured away from the crowd to one of these clandestine gatherings.

I turned down the smoke as it is not my thing.

I partook in drink instead.

They handed me a big shot of Fireball whiskey.

I gargled the cinnamon spiced liquor and then swished it around in my mouth.

After swallowing I asked if they had handed me water and if there was anything stronger.

As I raised my Leica to my eye I said “document everything”.

I then smiled and said “don’t worry…..

I’ll only capture you from the nose down.”

 

Attached are the images from the photo story.

You can view more of my work on my website and blog:

www.photographsbyben.com

www.photographsbybenmiller.blogspot.com

Thank you Steve and Brandon for having a wonderful website that so many of us look forward to everyday.

Cheers,

Ben Miller

Secret Party 1

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Secret Party 9

Secret Party 8

Secret Party 7

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Secret Party 3

Secret Party 2

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Secret Party 13

Secret Party 14

Jul 192014
 

40mm, the blind frame

by Daniel Schaefer

40mm, the blind frame.
As any photographer building out a kit knows, the stresses of balancing both budget, and usability when purchasing lenses is always a daunting challenge. When I was an SLR shooter, I always tended towards two fields of view, primarily 35mm for my everyday carry, and 50mm for portrait work. I was however always frustrated by the limits of the two and found myself stuck switching more often than I would like.

I was never entirely able to settle the frame in a way that I liked, 35mm was near perfect horizontally, but for a vertical portrait I found it unflattering, the 50mm had the opposite issue, near flawless for the vertical frame, but far too tight for any horizontal image, far too isolating to show scene the way I wished I could.

I was one day lucky enough to be handed a friends beautiful silver M6, with the task of putting the long retired workhorse back to good use. The task then came down to finding a lens to put the camera to use with. I’ve spent the past few years doing freelance Vintage equipment maintenance, resale and repair, during that time a lens that came across my desk time and time again, yet never managed to catch my attention was the oft forgotten Leica/Minolta Rokkor 40mm f/2

The particular lens is an interesting amalgamation of German and Japanese construction, German optics, shipped in brass tubes to Japan to be assembled under the Minolta monicker. The one hazard, was the lack of 40mm frame lines on the M6, I had the 50mm, I had the 35mm, but for my new weapon of choice I needed to figure out a way to compose…

So, blind to the edges of my frame, I began shooting, both from my eye as per usual, but with my new-found freedom that ignorance of the frame gave me, I began for the first time, shooting almost exclusively from the hip. I began to learn the frame, roll after roll I began to learn the space that the lens occupied, near perfect both horizontally and vertically, the lens sang just as sweetly for street, or portraits.

I’ve been shooting almost exclusively with the 40mm for the past six months, both on the M6, and now an M9. I always approach equipment choice by wondering what story it might let me tell, and so far, I’m enjoying the one the 40mm is writing.

—–


Photographer and Cinematographer

New York / Los Angeles / Firenze

Outlierimagery.com

 

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Jul 032014
 

A Leica wedding tryout

By Ronald Tan

Hello Steve
I’ve been an avid reader of your site and it has been a daily source of inspiration to me I’ve always been interested in the articles related to Leica. In my free time,i shoot weddings with a Canon Dslr.However, I’ve always toyed with the idea of shooting a wedding with a Leica

I came across this article on your site
http://www.stevehuffphoto.com/2013/11/15/yes-i-do-the-leica-m240-as-a-wedding-photographers-tool-by-joeri-van-der-kloet/

and this inspired me to try shooting with my M9. So off I went on a wedding assignment with my DSLR and my M9 in tow!

I shot these images with my M9 and a voigtlander 50mm 1.1. I simply love the images from the M9 and so do the couple. Hopefully one day, i can be like Joeri and make shooting weddings with a Leica my trademark as well

Image 1:Leica M9 F1.4 1/125 ISO160

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Image 2:Leica M9 F1.2 1/1000 ISO160

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Image 3:Leica M9 F1.2 1/1000 ISO160

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Ronald Tan
http://www.flickr.com/redsun81

Jul 032014
 

Greetings from Upper Bavaria in South Germany with my M9

By Rainer
Hello!

I like to take pictures outside in the landscape of Bavaria with its picturesque atmosphere. Most of them are quite simple shots but every once in a while, I capture some really neat shots. This is not because I am a great technical photographer, but because I am actually there, right in the middle of the world that excites me the most. Even though I am not a pro, I still love to take photos just like you. These are the photos I would like to share with you

Located throughout the northern Alpine foothills, Upper Bavaria is home to pristine lakes, steep mountains and the famous metropolis of Munich. Today, I would like to share a couple of photos capture last week during the Corpus Christi Procession (also known as Corpus Domini) at Samerberg (Alp region), celebrated by the Catholic Church, the local society for traditional costumes and the mountain troops.

All the photos are captured with my Leica M9 and a Summilux 35 mm lens. (You can find more photos on www.samerbergernachrichten.de and www.rainernitzsche.de).

The Leica M is a fabulous camera to capture the colors of traditional costumes and the specific atmosphere in Upper Bavaria.

Take care, Rainer

Picture 1 and 2: Salute during Corpus Christi procession at Samerberg

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SteveHuffPhoto_02

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Picture 3, 4,5: The procession to different altars, representing the four corners of the earth.

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Picture 6 People join the procession in traditional clothes.

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Picture 7: After the procession, parishioners return to the church where benediction usually takes place.

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Jun 102014
 

Tibet with my M9

By John Kurniawan

Hi Steve/Brandon,

I am a frequent visitor of you side after I got my first M9+cron 35asph. I have not using rangefinder type of camera for 20+ years since my FM2 rest inside the drawer as I am busy building up my business.

Around 10 years ago when I got a second daughter I start to get D300 and shot occasionally not seriously yet till last Jun we are on a vacation trip where I have to carry bag pack, a DSLR+zoom lens and for sure shopping bags…..

Leica M9 has been my dreams since it launch but back and forth hesitate to get one as have the mind-set difficult to focus, everything else must be manually set, so last August I took the plunge and get a pre-owned M9 from a friend. The first 2 weeks quite frustrating to get use to it, but I determined must get over it and since then every where I travel only one cam and one lens to off some of the load.

Herewith I attached some shots of my recent trip to Tibet, hope all of you enjoy the colorful Tibet.

Cheers

Gangway

Prayers

MonksDebate

Nannie

May 262014
 

Photowalk and Workshop Thoughts

By Ben

Steve and Brandon,

The first photography workshop that I attended was the street photography workshop you hosted in Chicago during September 2011. It was a wonderful experience.

I recently had the opportunity to teach a street photography workshop hosted by the local camera shop in my area. I met very passionate photographers and was able to share my thoughts with them. I learned from them as well. I think that workshops are fantastic and I wish they occurred more frequently. I wanted to share my thoughts with you and your readers regarding photowalks and workshops.

Photowalk is not a word that can be easily be found defined in a dictionary. I understand it to mean: An informal organized gathering of people whose intent is to stroll around leisurely taking photos, enjoying themselves, and learning from one another through interaction and observation. I think that photowalks are analogous to photography workshops. They can be considered one and the same.

Workshops and photowalks are great investment and idea for photographers at every skill level. Here is why:

Education

No explanation is necessary. We all benefit from instruction. Regarding workshops in general, photography related or not, I always take something away from the experience.

Interaction

Workshops allow for more individualized attention. Studies have shown that more is accomplished with a smaller teacher to student ratio. A smaller group size allows for more opportunity for communication. Sometimes individual student/teacher time is included during a workshop. Before a workshop I determine what it is that I want to get out of the workshop. I prepare a list of questions ahead of time. Many of these questions are naturally answered through the content of material presented. The other questions I will ask the instructor during a one-on-one session.

Informality

Workshops typically consist of ten or fewer students. In my formal career I have had the opportunity to present, teach, and mentor numerous times. There are benefits to learning in smaller groups. I have seen it with my own eyes. In larger groups and in classroom settings it is harder for people to speak up and ask questions. I once taught a night class at the local college that only had seven students enrolled. The restraint and sheepishness of students was almost non-existent. In that situation I felt less like a teacher and more like a big brother type of mentor. The atmosphere was very relaxed. People felt comfortable. I have observed the same type of social synergy in photography workshops. People interact, they speak up and communicate.

Time

Workshops are generally scheduled for a full weekend or less. I’ve heard time and time again that the best way to become a photographer is to keep your day job. Like most of us, I have a 9 to 5 career. There isn’t time available in my busy life to enroll in formal photography or art classes. Workshops are great because they generally occur over the weekend. They are usually held at a very great location and thus can feel like a mini vacation. One day workshops that are held on a Saturday seem to fit me well. My wife and I will generally travel to the workshop destination on Friday night after work. Saturday day is taken up with me at the workshop and my wife shopping or checking out the tourist attractions that are offered. We meet up in the evening for dinner and a night out on the town. I also use this time out with my wife to get some street shooting in as well. It’s great to multitask street shooting while out on a date with your love. The day ends up being a full day of photography for me.

Camaraderie

People like to spend time with other like minded people with the same interests. Workshops mainly consist of time in a classroom followed by shooting time. During this shooting time there is much interaction. This is where I approach or am approached by others to chat about what has previously discussed during the day. Conversations typically start with “I really agreed with your comment regarding……” or “I have the same camera. Do you like the lens you are shooting with? I’ve considered buying it.” Advertising for workshops should include “For sale: instant friends, just add cameras”. I have met many great people attending photography workshops. Someone usually facilitates email address exchange at the end. I can say that I keep in contact with some people I’ve met through email or simply following and commenting on their blogs, social pages, etc.

Attached are several photos that I captured during the second session of the workshop I taught. All photos were taken with a Leica M9 and Voigtlander 35mm Skopar PII.

You can view more of the photos at:
www.photographsbyben.com
www.photographsbybenmiller.blogspot.com

Thank you Steve and thank you Brandon for keeping such a wonderful website and giving all of us something to look forward to everyday.

Cheers,

Ben

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May 242014
 

Travel Photography: The Algarve, Portugal

By Hilmar Buch

There are photographers who keep their knowledge, skills and shooting technique just for themselves, and I’m sure each of them has a good cause to do so. And there are those photographers who share their broad and in-depth knowledge with everybody else, often even for free; they don’t ask what they will get in return.

Of course I very much appreciate what the latter group has done for the photographic community and I have profited a lot from watching videos online and reading articles. As I’m not in a position to give back to the community by writing an article on the technical aspects of photography, I’d like to share a little travel experience with you.

In September and October 2013 we spent a few weeks on the Algarve which is the region in the south of Portugal. Although the Algarve is well-known at least to Europeans as a beautiful travel destination, there are no doubt more popular regions that come to mind when Europeans plan their next holidays. Having visited the Algarve I can point out that it’s absolutely worth and rewarding to spend your holidays there but as always you need to know what you are looking for and what you get.

The Algarve is not a region for doing partying all night (although you could do that, too) but is rather known for its intact countryside, culture and people; and in the evening you can participate in the snugness and the good meals of the local restaurants.

In terms of the scenery, the western and eastern part of the Algarve should be distinguished. The eastern part is rather rocky in the countryside and borders on Spain. In fact a broad river called Guardiana separates these two countries down in the south so it’s recommended not to forget your passport when crossing this river by boat.

The western part shines if you love spectacular beaches and rock formations. Almost every bay has its own beach with sparkling white sands. Most beaches can be reached by car, foot or boat. The sea can be quite rough here, what we loved and what makes the region very popular for doing water sports such as wakeboarding.

Our time of travel at the end of European summer and early autumn respectively was perfect. The temperatures were pleasant (around 22-25 degrees Celsius at midday and in the afternoon) and the places and beaches we visited weren’t crowded, though not dreary at all. Hotel prices were good as off season had just begun.

After or before spending some time in the Algarve region, I recommend to visit Lisbon, the capital of Portugal. This city is very special but it’s hard to put it into words why many others and I feel that way. Stereotypes described with terms such as ‘fado’ and ‘saudade’ (both are Portuguese words) are generally attributed to Lisbon and its inhabitants, but the city and the people living there deserve not to be put into a box. There’s much more than that and you should definitely make your own experience.

Publishing this little report on a photography site I’ll add a lot of photographs, aiming to illustrate the beauty and uniqueness of that region. Photographic opportunities arise almost everywhere, comprising a lot of sun vs shade situations. The beaches are gorgeous and invite you to shoot either with the sun in your back or in front of you.

If you’re wondering what kind of equipment I use for taking photographs, have a look at my earlier contribution to Steve’s great website, featuring shooting in Namibia (http://www.stevehuffphoto.com/2013/06/17/shooting-in-nambia-by-hilmar-buch/). That article is more gear geek related. I still use the same camera and lenses.

So what does my report on the Algarve have to do with the introduction of this report? As I would love the Algarve to remain rather unnoticed, it would have been better to keep silent. But the place deserves to be explored by you guys! Maybe this article will attract a few of you to discover this region and make you enjoy taking photos in a foreign location.

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May 202014
 

Art of the Grind

By Huss Hardan

Grind: Definition: A skateboard trick where the skateboarder slides on the trucks.

Skateboarding is part of the scene in my home town of Venice, California. Most days when I’m not at work I’m down at the beach on a long board, with my dogs and a camera in tow.
There is a big skate park just off the board walk, which attracts dare devils as well as on lookers.

I took these shots using Leitz 18 and 28mm lenses on a Leica M-E. I found the manual focus rangefinder perfect for this work, as I would pre-focus on a spot, while the optical viewfinder allowed me to keep both eyes open so I could time the release as the rider came into view. This enabled a lag free experience.

I concentrated on the shadows created as I was going for a different look than the usual action shots. This also allowed me to shoot down removing distractions from the frame. I set the camera to add an extra 1 2/3 stops as the extremely harsh reflections from the concrete bowl would normally cause drastic under exposure.

Peace out
Huss

husshardan.com

Art of the Grind 1

Art of the Grind 2

Art of the Grind 3

Art of the Grind 4

May 152014
 

Thailand with my Leica M9

By Thomas Cassagne

My name is Thomas, and I am a French amateur – but passionate – photographer.

I began shooting with a Leica M7 a few years ago, mostly black and white. But processing the films took me too long and I could not spend enough time on the streets, which made switch – with some reluctancy – to a Leica M9, about two years ago. I also switched to color, mostly because I do not like the rendering of digital black and white, but also because I wanted to try something new.

Over the years, my interest in photography narrowed to two categories : family, which I keep to myself, and street photography, that I started publishing on a blog a few months ago. Most of my pictures are taken in my hometown, Paris, or during my travels.

Here is a small series of pictures that I took during a travel to Thailand last summer. It is a beautiful country, and traveling is easy even with kids. I strongly recommend it!

For those interested in gear, let me say that all the pictures below were taken either with an old Summicron 35 mm (version IV), or with a brand new Summilux 50 mm. I processed the images in Lightroom 5 – the best photo software in my opinion. Here we go!

First, a picture of Bangkok. I like this picture because it is representative of what I like in this city : messy, but colorful and strangely beautiful.

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Scooters are a very important means of transportation in Thailand, and there is no limitation to the number of passengers : I found that this multi-generational scooter was a beautiful example of this.

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Tuk-tuks are also part of the street landscape of the city – and an fun way to discover it.

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Street vendors, and especially food vendors, are everywhere on the streets. The food is exceptionally cheap and good.

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Waiting for customers can be long, which makes reading the news a very popular activity…

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At night, Bangkok’s Chinatown can look somehow like NYC..

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Monks are also an important part of the visual landscape, and it is always a pleasure to see their orange gown in the streets or – of course – in the temples.

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When traveling around the country, you can meet some incredible characters, such as this boat driver, who was very nice and caring.

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Even in touristic areas, such as old temples, there are always opportunities for interesting pictures.

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The countryside and its rice fields are very impressive, and a good opportunity to meet different Thai people.

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Finally, when you reach the islands of the south of Thailand, expect to be amazed by the beauty of the color of the sea…

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I hope you enjoyed those pictures : of course I welcome any comments!

Cheers,

Thomas

www.thomasveyre.wordpress.com

May 132014
 

One year of Leica

By Philipp Weimer

Hi Steve,

I stumbled over your site a bit more than a year ago, when I started to seriously think about getting a Leica. Having stopped taking pictures pretty much in the late eighties, I had rediscovered photography in 2010 when I got my first DSLR and by End of 2011 I was quite fascinated with street photography. As everybody on the internet was raving about how great Leica would be for that, I got interested in it and googling for Leica, I found your site.

And so your site, together with photos I found on the internet made me put an M9 under my Christmas tree in 2011. As I like to take my shots on the street wide open, I quickly realized that the M9 wouldn’t turn me into a stellar street photographer over night. Shooting wide open with Leica glass means you can’t use zone focussing, you have to set focus on your subject with precision and, even after a year of using it, I’m still slower than the autofocus on my D5000.

But did I ever regret buying it? Not for one second!

It sure is not a camera I would recommend to a beginner. It’s auto white balance is quirky, if not to say random. The usable high ISO performance ends for me at 1250. Which I think is quite a clever marketing strategy to make people dream of a Noctilux. It does have aperture priority, but with the 35mm, getting the exposure right is a challenge as soon as the sky is visible on a sunny day if you’re on auto. And of course, manual focussing needs practice, practice and then some more practice.

And still I would say, 2012 is the year, the quality of my pictures made a huge jump forward. The camera sure slowed me down, but made me think more. I learned to focus manually, set my white balance with a grey card in tricky light, I learned how to set the exposure manually. And every now and then, when I did things right, the M9 gave me a picture that made me smile and kept me pushing forward.

Turning 50 this year, I decided to look for an M3 built in 1962 and after finding one, I got into film as well, which helps me to improve further. Having only 36 shots per roll makes you take pictures more consciously, which helps improving the composition in the shots. Not to mention the fun developing your black and white films at home.

Was it the Leica that made me progress so much this year? Probably not alone. There is also Google Plus, which helped me to hook up with photographers, both virtually and in person. Not to mention the warm and fuzzy feeling of getting your photos “plussed”. But there is this special feeling I only get with a Leica. The way it feels in the hand. The simplistic mode of operation. Unlike other cameras, it makes my mind go into photography mode when I hold it. With it I make pictures, I don’t take them.

And so, as a thank you for work, your site and making me buy a Leica, I send you a couple of shots I took this year. Sort of a thank you token :)

Cheers Phil

Afternoon in the park

Artist

City of Zug

Stepping into the light

Sunrise over Lake Zürich

Leica M3, 50mm cron, Kodak 400TX @ 400 ISO

May 072014
 

The Sony A7r & 55 1.8 along with the M9 & Noctiluxf1

By Julien Ducenne

Hi Steve and Brandon,

My Name is Julien Ducenne, I am a filmmaker living in London and working on images for about 12 years now.

Since long time my dream was to have a Leica M and couple years ago I bought the M9 with a CV 35f1.2, I was amazed by the quality of both and quickly bought a Noctilux f1 to continue my personal learning and exploration on images. I really love shallow depth of field, and the bokeh was great…
Until the day when the Sony A7r was available, I bought it with the FE55mm 1.8 and with a bokeh result really close to the Noctilux ( at equal aperture), I had more details and Sharpness on my pictures. I did not regret the Noctilux at all and I will continue to Buy M mount lenses but I will use both…

…At the end gear is only gear and the result only matter…

Have a great day.

Julien Ducenne

My Flicker : http://www.flickr.com/photos/ducenne/

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not alone

escape

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