May 262015
 

Dear Steve, dear Brandon,
my name is Cordt and I have been following your site for quite some time. I always wanted submit a photo or two, but never quite had a series of 3 photos I deemed original or noteworthy enough to be published. This changed when I started rowing in Oxford, which is a huge part of social life among the students here and always takes place quite early in the morning. There is something special about the light so early in the morning and the mind still feels quite dizzy when rowing before breakfast. Even though I didn’t want to take my camera with me on the boat, I wanted to try to capture the atmosphere at least.

I only own a x100s, but for the first photo I needed a wider lens in order to get the effect I wanted and also to avoid getting wet feed; I was standing right on the edge of the platform so backing down a bit was no option. I therefore borrowed a Canon 1100D with the 18-55mm kit lens and took this shot at 18mm. I don’t know why so many people always go on about kit lenses. This shot was taken at f/5.0 ISO 400 at 1/4000 sec and I personally think that the lens delivered quite well.

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The second image was taken with my trusty x100s at f/8.0, ISO 400 and 1/4000 sec. It was already mid day, though.

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The final image was taken just seconds after the first image. 42mm again 1/4000 sec and f/5.0 at ISO 200.

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All images were processed and converted to black and white in Lightroom. I am still a beginner in terms of digital process and I’m always eager to learn more. I would therefore be grateful for any critique and tips.

Thank you very much!

Cordt van Geuns-Rosch

May 252015
 

Dear Steve and Brandon,

I am an amateur at a very basic skill level. I take, what I would kindly refer to as, populist photographs (i.e. lots of color, often oversaturated and contrast filled). I enjoy taking pictures intensely. Although I initially started with a P&S V-lux2, with CSCs, I started out with a GF-1 with the PL25 1.4 (four thirds lens), moving to an EM-5 with a PL 14-150 zoom as well as a GH2 with the PL 45 2.8 and finally to an M9P with a summilux 50. I recently acquired an X vario that I enjoy intensely as well. I’m enclosing a group of pictures that I feel represent a bit of everything.

Leica V-lux.

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GF- Pana Leica 25 1.4

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GH2 Pana Leica 14-150

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Leica M-9P with Lux 50

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May 242015
 

Hi Steve & Brandon,

Your review of the Nex-7 helps my decision to buy one three years ago. Thus, you are to blame if I enjoy it so much and get this week the Sony France National Award 2015, 3rd prize (www.worldphoto.org/national-award-2015/france).

A b&w photograph in dark condition at 3200 ISO with the Sony 50/1.8 stabilized opened at 1.8. I’m very happy to get this prize with a photograph taken in my village in the Gers (Simorre, 650 inhabitants) 300 meters far from my house. It was in August 2014 while a song festival. These tired children came on the small stage. They sat next to each other enlightened by a single spotlight. I watched them, waiting a fleeting photographic moment. Within a couple of seconds, I took three pictures. This one is the last one.

I attach two others photographs taken in the same period in the same place.

I will keep a cool head, following your reviews and inspirations and being inspired by them. Thanks for your great work and come home when you travel in the south-west of France, you’re welcome !

Gilles Vanderstraeten, French enthusiast photographer

(Still daily inspired in march 2013, #397)

Portfolio : www.simorre.net

Les Moissons Sonores

Les Moissons Sonores

The last concert

May 212015
 
johnbigbeer

Kia Ora from Aotearoa New Zealand!

My name is Luke, an Englishman living in the corner of the world with my kiwi partner Milo, and my baby daughter Rata.

Here are some photos I’ve taken recently that I love. I know I know, more baby pictures right… But kids are just such a great subject! Especially when it’s you’re own little dude.

These 3 were all taken at bath time on my Lumix GX7. All shots taken with my Panny 20mm f1.7 wide open.

Man I love photography. So addictive hey! I can’t get enough of your daily inspirations and other great photos people are constantly taking. It’s so special how passionate people are about capturing image, and how unique each persons eye for framing, colour, subject etc is.

I’ve recently started to process my RAW photos more in Lightroom, bringing back highlights and shadow details, playing around with contrast and colour. It’s a huge learning curve! Feel like I do more damage than good at the moment, but I’ll get there! Any tips you can offer for using Lightoom would be hugely appreciated!

Arohanui
Luke, Milo & Rata

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May 192015
 
Drum Men

Hi Steve and Brandon,

My name is Richard Palmer

All these photos have been shot on a Mamiya 7ii using Ilford Hp5 and developed in Ilford Microphen.
The photo of my dad was shot at 1/125 using f8, the photo of my brother was shot at 1/30 using f5.6,
and the photo of the rugby pitch was shot at 1/250 using f16.

My details are:

Flickr
https://www.flickr.com/photos/richie_photographer
and my instagram is https://instagram.com/richardjamespalmer/

Thanks for this opportunity.

Richie.

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May 162015
 

Hello Brandon!

I recently decided to get back into film photography again and bought a NIKON FM2n with a Nikkor 50mm F1.4 AI-S. The idea was to get and use a cam that is nearly free of electronics. I also missed the manual focussing by split screen which is think is a very cool way to focus. The goal was to walk around my city and find cool things, maybe even some new cool things (i did find that, an abandoned graveyard!). As film i used the ILFORD XP2. It gives me some leeway if the camera’s light meter is off and “colour film” is also easier to scan. All photos are taken at F2. Scanning was done on a FUJI Frontier SP300 by an external service. When i got the files back i was blown away by the quality of the results. Not only did the photos have a certain “Zeiss look” but they were also very sharp and full of details. Something i would have never expected like this. I guess the professional scanning plays a huge role in this but it also looks like the Nikkor lens is very good, too. Just look at the photos in full resolution!

Thanks to the Huffs for giving me a chance to show my photos to a larger audience!

Sincerly,

Feininger’s Cat

https://www.flickr.com/photos/feiningers-cat/

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May 132015
 

Hi Brandon & Steve,

I’m a long-time reader and now I’m very happy to send in my first submission to your great site! I really enjoy visiting daily to find a mix of excellent photos, inspiring stories and interesting gear talk!

In January this year myself and an old friend travelled (me from Dublin and my friend from Berlin) to Marrakech, Morocco and drove just over 60km south to the High Atlas mountains to tackle the highest mountain in North Africa, Jebel Toubkal. So far so good, the journey was an easy one thanks to low-cost airlines and the internet helped us plan everything. The High Atlas mountains are relatively accessible, being so close to Marrakech, and Marrakech is a popular tourist destination with tonnes of flights in and out. In terms of gear, we were carrying heavy backpacks and I wanted to bring the least extra weight in cameras whilst still coming home with some nice images. I carried my Panasonic GX7, Olympus 9mm fisheye body cap lens, Panasonic 20mm f/1.7 pancake and Olympus 45mm f/1.8 in an Olympus PEN Street Case M. This gave a good range and the opportunity for some fun shots, in a very light, tough and easy to carry package. The 1/8000s fastest shutter speed was very useful for dealing with bright snow scenes.

The hike was over two days, setting off very early in the morning each day and finishing in the afternoon well before dusk settled. We didn’t take a guide. The going was very difficult through snow and the altitude made it tougher (we started at Imlil at 1,740 metres (5,710 ft) and the summit was 4,167 metres (13,671 ft)). I think it might be the hardest thing I’ve ever done but was very much worth it!!

All pictures are taken in RAW with Panasonic GX7 and processed in Aperture. Our sustenance for the first day and then the view back down the mountain towards Spain on the morning of the second day were shot with the 20mm, while the group at the summit and the view from the summit towards the Sahara desert were shot with the 9mm fisheye.

My Flickr: https://www.flickr.com/photos/ciarancreilly/
My Instagram: https://instagram.com/ciaranr/

Thanks!

Ciaran Reilly

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May 122015
 

Hi Steve and Brandon,

I’ve been a fan of the site for a number of years, starting when I first purchased a Panasonic GF1 in 2010. Your site is what first exposed me to Leica, and after learning more about rangefinders and the quality of Leica lenses, I doubled-down and purchased a second-hand M kit earlier this year.

I recently had an opportunity to attend an NBA game in Washington and take photos with my Leica M9. My current kit of a 28mm Elmarit and a 50mm Summicron put me at a slight disadvantage in terms of shooting game action with available light, but the images I wanted to create were focused less on typical sports shots, and more on team dynamic, behind-the-scenes images, pictures of fans, etc.

All images were processed in Nik Color Efex and Silver Efex 2.

A complete gallery can be found at
http://www.mydecisivemoments.com/Wizards-Grizziles-NBA-2015/

Thanks and keep up the great work!
Eric F. Hernandez

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May 112015
 

Hi Brandon and Steve,

Greetings from Tokyo!

I’m a long-time viewer of your site, which I’ve always found informative and entertaining. Many thanks for putting (and keeping) it all together.

Tokyo is such a densely populated city, it’s often challenging to find simplicity among the chaos. But if you view the streets, buildings, and its characters with eyes trained over time to filter out the noise, every once in a while you are rewarded with the opportunity to capture an intriguing scene. Then it’s up to your technical and artistic skills to actually document the image your eye initially discovered.

Lately, I’ve given in to the nature of the metropolis and decided to capture not only the main subjects of the composition, but also the natural foreground elements, which often end up adding to the depth of the image and present the viewer with a more genuine representation of the urban landscape.

Well, I hope you enjoy some of my images and thanks again for the wonderful site!

My photos can be found online at http://www.stevemorinphoto.com

Best,

Steve Morin

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May 092015
 

Hello Steve and  Brandon,

Photography has been a hobby for me over the last 18 months, and this blog is one of my favorite in terms of stopping by for some quick inspiration.  I particularly love this Daily inspiration idea, and looked forward to the day that I would be comfortable to share some of my images.  I’m an American expat working in Africa, and spend a lot of time during the year traveling.  This in principal is what led me to photography as a means to document my various adventures.  I initially started with a full frame DSLRss, but finally settled on a Fuji setup that I’m very happy with.

The images I am submitting today are from a trip late last year to north Thailand.  My wife and I visited Anantara Elephant Camp with Lee Craker, whom we discovered through this site.  The trip was absolutely memorable with 3 full days spent with the Mahouts and their noble elephants.  Images below were taken with both a D800 with the 24-70 F2.8 & 70-200 F2.8, and also Fuji Xpro1 and 56mm F1.2.

My Tumblr
My Flickr

Thanks for the opportunity to share.

Regards
Chez

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May 082015
 

Hello Steve and Brandon. A few months ago you published some of my ancient black and white film images. Seemed like time to share what 35 years of work looks like with some recent color pictures.

“Dead End” was made with a Fuji X-pro and 27mm pancake lens. f/3.2 @ 1/30th. -1/3 EV at ISO 6400.

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“It Ain’t Complicated” was with a Nikon Df and 70 -200 f/2.8 lens @ 200mm. f/5 @ 1/640th, ISO 100 and a +1 EV. I used this camera because it allowed me to flatten the picture plane and it was in my bag as I was on my way home from a job.

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“Joseph” was made with a Leica M8 w/ a 21mm f/4 Voigtlander lens (28mm equiv.) f/6.7 @1/750th and ISO 320. The M8 was my first go with a non DSLR digital. Worked for this image that’s for sure!

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Lots of cameras but not really. Using only Fujis now and probably moving to a Sony (because I like it). All images are printed full frame on 24×30″ paper and look exquisite. Hope you enjoy!
There are tons more on my site http://www.tommybrownpictures.com .
Best,
Tommy Brown

May 072015
 

Hello,

I’m a freelance photographer from Indonesia. On mid December last year I have a chance to visit Jogjakarta. Jogjakarta known as famous travel destination in Java. Its great city with many historical sites such as Sultan’s Palace, Hindu temple, and the Dutch fort. And its good to do some street photography there.
When I’m traveling I always bring my DSLR and film camera. But for this time I took different approach, I just bring my trusty Spotmatic for BW and Fuji Silvi f2.8 for color. And it end up that I took more picture with compact point and shoot.

The other photos from this series, http://hendraprabowo.wordpress.com/2015/01/30/jogja-istimewa/

And you can find me at Flickr https://www.flickr.com/photos/cakbowo/ or instagram @pakbowo

Thank you

Bowo

Fujifilm Zoom Date f2.8 | Fuji C200

Fujifilm Zoom Date f2.8 | Kodak Colorplus 200

Fujifilm Zoom Date f2.8 | Fuji C200

May 062015
 

Hi Brandon,

I’ve been working on a longterm documentary project on amateur college sumo in Japan and thought you might be interested in some of the images.

I chose a contrast black and white retro approach inspired by the old LIFE Magazine stories to highlight the heroic and athletic aspect of authentic sumo rather than just show how fat some of the guys are. In fact these young men are serious athletes capable of lightning fast reactions and awesome power.

I really hope you like them and choose one of them for “Daily inspiration.” At some later time I would be happy to submit a longer piece based on this project for “User reports.”A few years ago, just after the East japan earthquake and Tsunami I submitted a photo story which Steve published on the aftermath of the disaster from a Tokyo vantage point, so this is not my first time on the site.

Please let me know if and when you decide to upload one of the photos.

Info:

All shot with a Fujifilm XT1 and 27mm F2.8, 35mm F1.4 and 60mm F2.4.

Thank you in advance for your kind consideration,
Francis Harrison
Tokyo, Japan

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May 052015
 

Hi Brandon and Steve,

Thanks for running a great website. I’ve been following you ever since google pointed me in your direction some eight years ago while I was researching the crazy idea of buying a Leica rangefinder camera. I was inspired by you’re enthusiasm to take the plunge. And it was one of the best decisions I have ever made. So Thanks!

The reason I was inspired to buy into such a limited and expensive system, was that I wanted a very different photographic experience. Anyhow, this isn’t meant to be a Leica eulogy. I’m pretty sure, if I had been in a similar situation today rather than eight years ago, I’d be holding a brand new Sony A7s in my hand, rather than my trusty M. And I’d be equally happy with it.

So why am I so happy with the decision I made?

Like many other readers of your website, my camera now occupies a central role in my life. I’m the (annoying) guy who seems to always have his camera with him at every social or family gathering. My favourite Christmas gift was an ONA camera bag that doubles up as my briefcase for work – with a special pocket for my M240 + one lens (usually a 35 cron). My camera now commutes to the office with me every day. Photography has become a habit rather than a hobby.

My kids, wife, family and friends have grown used to my camera’s presence and welcome it. And I hope, over time, my pictures will play an increasingly valued role in prompting our happiest memories. Some recent memories of my daughter Eva, captured below.

Eva showing her Nona and Grandpa the new mouthguard she needs for hockey.

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Eva’s 8th Birthday

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At the local park. Mum and Dad laugh at something Eva says.

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© 2009-2015 STEVE HUFF PHOTOS All Rights Reserved
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