Feb 232015
 

Brandon, here’s a troika for you and Steve, showing my native Seattle posing for the winter light.

I photographed these after an extended stay in Europe, as sort of way to remind me of the look and feel of my hometown. I have used these photos for my “night job” writing about cities (as Steve knows, I’m a lawyer by day), explaining how no captions are really needed to highlight the plain views of “context and color, light and dark, land and water, nature and structure, where people work and live and more”.

Funny thing: Other than the Sony A7S, which captured the floating bridge/Mount Rainier shot (with the Zeiss 24-70 FE lens), these photographs were not taken with cameras that I customarily use (or that you guys like to write about). ‘

Rather, Canon SLR’s set the tone! The “Mount Rainier in the trees” shot was taken with the Rebel SL-1 and Sigma 18-250 lens, and the Seattle Skyline shot with the new Canon 7D Mark II, with the 70-200 F4L USM. No one should accuse the new 7D of being just a sports and wildlife camera!

Happy New Year, and please keep up the great work.

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Feb 192015
 

Hello, Brandon!

After following the website for some time and being inspired by so many contributors, I thought it time to return the favor. No great wisdom here–just a few fun shots from an afternoon outing.

General George Washington’s crossing of the Delaware River on the night of December 25, 1776, was a turning point of the Revolutionary War. Each year on Christmas afternoon, historical reenactors honor the event by rowing across the Delaware from Washington Crossing, Pennsylvania, to Washington Crossing, New Jersey–weather and river conditions permitting.

Conditions were nearly perfect for the crossing on December 25, 2014. I went down to the river with my Nikon D600 and a Nikkor 70mm-300mm lens to photograph the afternoon’s events. I had a good vantage point to take pictures of the reenactors, who put a lot of time and effort into their roles. Three gentlemen stood out, both for their costumes and their facial expressions.

The first photo shows a man rushing by me to meet General Washington’s boat as it reached the shore.

The second picture shows one of the men who sailed with General Washington. I wonder what he was thinking.

The third picture shows a crew sailing back across the river. I thought the young man with the beard looked a bit tentative about the day’s events.

Thanks for looking. If you are interested, other examples of my work are at https://www.flickr.com/photos/117582905@N05/.

Michael Ruger

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Feb 162015
 

Hi Brandon and Steve,

I submitted a post a while back and though it was time for a new one. This set was shot on a grey day on an old wharf in the north of Amsterdam. Oh, and we also ran into some people doing cosplay which injected some fun into the shots and made up for the grey sky a bit.

Beauty is a funny thing. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder but when it comes to people, we tend to isolate a very specific age group as the representation of beauty. Of course there are exceptions, but twenty- and thirty-somethings would top the list of age groups most mentioned when asking about beautiful people. With buildings and urban areas in general, things are not so straightforward. We tend to like the shiny and new as well as the old. New glass and steel skyscrapers that awe us with their presence and elegantly shaped new houses are often labeled beautiful. But then again, so are ancient buildings. Or buildings and urban areas that are a hundred years old. So our range of beauty in this area is actually very broad, in contrast to how we see people. However, there is one clear category in buildings and urban areas that we tend to like the least and that is that of the recent past. Buildings that are between ten and thirty years old don’t tend to hold up that well. You know what I mean, the brick buildings of the late 80s and early 90s for instance. It just does not look right, especially when it is locked in between older, more beautiful buildings on either side. What is the turning point until we start admiring a building again that ten years ago would have been hideous? Nobody knows.

There is another path to beauty in urban areas and that is a paradox in itself. If you let an area decay by itself, it often will come our more beautiful than before. An example is the former wharf area in the north of Amsterdam, the NSDM-Wharf. This area is filled with empty factory halls, abandoned shipyards and scrap metal works. For a long time, it was left to its own to decay until groups from the fringes of society settled there and started using the buildings as ateliers. The place was somewhat cleaned up but still rough around the edges. It did not take long before rebellious companies like MTV and Red Bull set up shop here. Now, the area is buzzing with activity. Cafes opened, more ateliers were set up. And out of something that was considered ugly, beauty arose. Now let’s hope it does not get too polished and the area remains beautiful the way it is, with rough edges. You can find more info about the area on the NSDM website.

All images were shot with a Leica M. My website is: http://ertos.exposure.co

Thanks and keep up the great work with the site!

Kind regards,

Erwin

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Feb 132015
 

Hi Steve, hi Brandon,

This is my first attempt to obtain access to your “daily inspirations”.

This must be said first: I appreciate your idea to give other photographers the opportunity
for presenting some of their own works at a highly read blog. Thanks for!

I’m a 47 year old amateur-photographer from germany. Most of time I’m interested in shooting scenes and people in urban surroundings. At the moment I catch my pictures with a small Fuji-equipment, one X100 (since a few weeks the T-Version) and one X-PRO 1, just with the 1.4/35mm. I like strong colors as you can see. The three added pics are from Cologne, New York and London.

Have fun in viewing the pictures,
best wishes,

Ralf Salewski
https://www.flickr.com/photos/ralfsalewski/

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Feb 102015
 

Great website Brandon,

Sharing the 3 images.

These images were taken with a 5D Mark III.
The man in the tunnel and the small church using a 17-40 wide angle Canon S lens and the end of day forest glow using the 24-105 lens.

The three pics were taken in Montreal on various trips.

Your site is bookmarked and will be checking it since it has so much tips

Best of luck

Rami El -Zein (from Beirut – Lebanon)
http://ramielzein.com
http://instagram.com/ramielzein
http://facebook.com/ramielzein

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Feb 072015
 

Hi Steve and Brandon,

I started out in the mirrorless world with a NEX-7. I had a video background so I never had an issue with having to use manual focus and an adapter instead of a native lens. I soon found out the benefits of peaking and focus magnification. More recently I now also use the Sony A7S and the FE lenses in addition to the NEX-7.

What attracted me to the A7S were the video features, low light focus capability, ability to use more rangefinder lenses than other A7 series cameras, and the images on your review. I was worried about the 12mp being too low for stills but in reality it’s all I need.

During a recent trip to the south coast of NSW in Australia I took my mirrorless cameras, the FE 35, FE55, and FE 70-200. I’m a more of a prime sort of person but on this trip I ended up having the zoom on the A7S most of the time. All are shot with the Sony A7S and the FE 70-200/4.

Thanks,

Craig

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Feb 032015
 

Hi Brandon and Steve,

Big fan of the site and have been a reader since I started shooting a few years ago (as a hobby, not professionally). Below is my submission for a daily inspiration article. You and your readers can find me on instagram and twitter at @fixie and on my website: http://jordanisip.com

In April, earlier this year, I quit my job. I was burnt out and desperately needed to recharge my batteries. At this time, my girlfriend was also finishing up graduate school. We decided to take the opportunity between jobs and her starting a new career to travel in SE Asia for a little over two months. We decided on Singapore, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam and figure out the exact cities along the way.

Since we’d be exploring all day, I knew photography would be very secondary to traveling and experiencing the culture so I wanted something very portable, compact, and semi-rugged but could still pack a decent punch with image quality. I decided to sell both of my digital cameras (Leica M9 and Sony A7R) and purchase the lightweight and inexpensive (relative to the M9 and A7R) Fuji XE-2 – and used the remaining money to help fund the trip. I brought just two lenses – the underrated 27mm f2.8 (40mm efl) and the 18mm F2 (27mm eql). Due to its slim size, I used the 27mm 90% of the time. But the 18mm was nice to have in tight spots. During the trip, I shot everything in JPEG format (no RAW), simply because I didn’t bring a laptop and could transfer JPEGs via in-camera wifi to backup to my phone along the way. While I missed the sharpness of the A7r and the rangefinder of the Leica at times, I found the XE-2 was just about perfect for what I needed for this trip.

Below are my favorite three photos from the trip. You can see more from this series an on my website at http://www.jordanisip.com/photographs/se-asia/

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Feb 022015
 

Hello Brandon,

My name is Massimo and I’m based in Turin, Italy.

I had a passion for cameras since I was a kid. I had a lot of cameras but never something serious. Then 3 years ago I decided to buy a good camera and I got a Sony Nex 5. Few months later I changed it with a Nex 7 and I started experiencing with old lenses and manual focus…

Months after months I got other old lenses and I was more and more interested on the manual handling rater than autofocus and similar things…… I started reading about Leica’s camera and I found also your website. I decided that it was the camera for me.About 8 months ago I got my first Leica M-E and from that moment I cannot think about a different way to take photos. Now I have the M-E and also an M7.

My lenses are a Leica Summarit-M 50mm/f2.5, a Leitz Elmar-C 90mm/f4, a Summicrom-M 35mm/f2 ASPH and a Voigtlander Nokton 50mm/f1.1.

Everything is always with me in my Billingham Adler Small. I like a lot shooting street photography, especially in B&W. I like capturing the life around me. Here some of my recent photos taken with the Leica M-E: all are B&W in camera jpeg.

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Please check my other photos on flickr and tumblr.

My best regards
Massimo (MaxDeVa)
http://mylifethroughaleica.tumblr.com
https://www.flickr.com/photos/madeva71/

Feb 012015
 

Hey guys,

I am a big fan of the site and because of the recommendations I got from Steve I got a RX1 and A7r. Keep up the good work guys. :)

I took my RX1 and my A7r (with both the 24-70 and the superb 55) to the Christmas market in Helsinki.

The size of both of the cameras makes it much less “scary” to subjects than a full-blown DSLR would. Plus I don’t have to give up on IQ with both of them.

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You can find me at:
Portfolio : http://dantas.photography
Streets of Helsinki : http://streetsofhelsinki.dantas.photography
Flickr : https://secure.flickr.com/photos/rhawidantas/sets/
thanks and Merry Christmas,

Rhawi Dantas

Jan 292015
 

Hi Brendon and Steve,

I’m Cliff from Singapore. I first came across your site a little more than a year ago, and I have to credit you for re-kindling my interest in photography. Since then, I have experimented with new digital gear, but also with film, which I’m in learning to hand process and scan at home.

Today, I hand processed my very first two rolls of colour film. I wanted share some of these photos with you.

All photos were shot with Kodak Portra 400 (ISO 800) on a Leica M6 non-TTL which I’ve been fortunate to have obtained.

Leica M6, Zeiss Planar 50mm F/2.0 ZM, Kodak Portra 400 (ISO 800)

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Leica M6, Voigtlander 35 F/1.2 Nokton Aspherical, Kodak Portra 400 (ISO 800)

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Leica M6, Zeiss Planar 50mm F/2.0 ZM, Kodak Portra 400 (ISO 800)

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Thanks Brandon and Steve for maintaining such an awesome site!

Best Regards,
Cliff Cheng

Jan 272015
 

Hi Brandon,

Thanks for putting so much effort into your site. I do enjoy musing over the daily inspiration and the other reportage posts you publish. I’ve always been interested in photography but have only become more serious about it over the last year or so. I’ve no idea if what I’m doing is any good but I love the creative process, the way it makes me try to see the world differently and, most especially, the opportunity to interact with people, in particular my family. So I’ve included three shots that I think best represent those qualities.

The B&W candid is of a complete stranger but I took the shot having had a random conversation with him and asked if he minded me taking his picture, which he did not. I was in between meetings (I try to take my camera with me whenever I am in that position as it’s always a great opportunity to shoot and having a young family can limit that opportunity), he was on his lunch break and we were both enjoying the Thames in London on a crisp and bright autumnal day.

The reflection of St Pauls was taken not far from the above picture and on the same day; for me this represents seeing the world in a different way and trying to represent a fabulous view in a way that hasn’t been seen before. St Pauls is a wonderful building as is the front of the Thames around that part of London, but taking a shot directly, even in good light, is an obvious choice. Reflections are a good way to see and think differently and I really like how this shot turned out.

The last image is of my son playing on the beach front of Brighton on the south coast of England. Brighton is a great place to shoot as there are so many interesting people and place around. The light in the evening can be spectacular so just shooting the pier (either the remaining one or the burnt out one) is a bit hackneyed so I wanted something that was more meaningful, at least to me. We’d spent the day there, we were all tired and on our way back to the car when the sun was low in the sky and me eldest suddenly wanted to play on this sculpture. Though tired, I persuaded my wife to let us stay a few moments more and I managed to get Ethan almost levitating up the face of this sculpture. The light is pretty good, but it’s the dynamism of my son and the excitement you can see even in just his facial profile that I love most about this shot. He barely sits still for a moment so this is him perfectly.

Best regards Greg (UK)

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Jan 262015
 

HI Steve, hi Brandon,

Sorry for my poor english

I’m a fan of your site for three years. reference point!

My name is Francesco Desiante , I have 36 years old and my passion for the photography have 7 years old J. My first camera is canon 350D with many bulky lens . now I took my shoot with Olympus  OMD EM 5 with panaleica 25 1,4 summilux. Killer combo! I live at Reggio Emilia in Emilia Romagna region.  My land is famous for the food, arts and motors,speed motors.

One name:Ferrari.

But also Maserati, Bugatti,Lamborghini,Ducati, Pagani . every year there is the motorshow, which contains the world’s largest producers of  the car.

Lancia delta Hf Integrale  WRC

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North east custom Italian custom

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Ferrari fans take a photo with your smartphone

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Ferrari bokeh

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thanks,
happy xmas day

 

Jan 242015
 

Hello Steve,

First of all, thank you for constantly updating your site with the most up-to-date information on micro43 cameras! Its been very informative and i’m constantly waiting for the next new post.

Ever since these two amazing micro43 cameras have come into production, I feel like the Olympus EM5 have always been the more favored camera over the EP5. And with the production of the EM1, EP5 has been completely overshadowed by the OM-D series.

Originally, I was in the market for the EM5. But at the time, with my budget, I was looking for the best deal possible. And to my surprise, I found a used (practically new) Olympus EP-5, 17mm 1.8 combo for $1000 (which was at the time going for $1400). I couldn’t pass on that so I made the purchase. Soon after I purchased the 45mm 1.8 and I have to say…I have absolutely no regrets.

With the lack of posts on the EP5, I wanted to get its name back on the map…EP5 photographers, let’s go out and shoot some amazing photos!

I’m currently working on a black&white project all shot with my Olympus EP-5: www.LastCapture.com

Personal: www.facebook.com/dannyi2yu, www.facebook.com/lastcaptured
Instagram: @dannyi2yu

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Jan 222015
 

Hi Brandon and Steve,

Ni hào from Beijing. I am a french expat in China for the next 3 years. All I can do there is take care of my little family and ……. pictures. Beijing is an amazing town with amazing people and culture. Can’t stop shooting! I have been following you for a couple of years now, I take my chance and send you some pictures. My two walking friends are a Nikon D3 with 24-70, 50 f1,4, 70-200 VR1 and my Leica M9 with a cron 35.

I love shooting people. I want to show you a part of ” behind the wall », what tourists don t see, where the streets have no name but where real life is.

I havent got portfolio just a small blog where I tell my chinese story :http://beijilexpat.blogspot.fr/

Best regards
Gilles Aygalenq

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