Sep 082015

A Visual Review of the Sony a7RII

By Marc Weisberg

Steve and Brandon, thank you for the opportunity to post with you for a second time. What you do for the photography community worldwide, is raise the bar on awareness and vision and provide an opportunity to be seen and heard. I applaud your continued efforts. I know first hand that it takes a tremendous amount of dedication and passion to keep fresh content on your site, and that it is a labor of love.

I’ve always believed in picking the best tool for the job. Since selling all my Canon gear last January {and I had lots} I’ve slowly purchased many new tools. To wit: Sony a6000, Sony a7s, Sony a7II and recently I acquired the a7RII.

My Sony glass collection has also grown to include: Sony Sonnar T* FE 35mm f/2.8 ZA, Sony Distagon T* FE 35mm f/1.4 ZA, Sony FE 16-35mm f/4.0 Z OSS, FE 24-70mm f/2.8 Z OSS, Sony Sonnar T* FE 55mm f/1.8 ZA , Sony 90mm f/2.8 Macro G OSS {for me is a life changing lens} I use the 90 for portraits, landscapes and macro photography, and the Sony 70-200 f/4.0 G OSS.

You may be thinking….”Hey dude. Overkill!” However, I use everybody and every lens for specific purposes. I have five different photography sites and specialize in a broad range of photography. Broad range – specialize…oxymoron? As I mentioned above the right tool for the right job.

Recently I headed out on a 2,700 mile road trip with my family. Orange County, CA –> Moab –> Aspen–> Denver –> Albuquerque –> Sedona for twelve days. In the first two days I photographed over 128gb of RAW images on the a7RII. I brought two bodies with me the a7RII and the a7s and all my lenses, sans the Sony Sonnar T* FE 35mm f/2.8 ZA.

How is the a7RII Compared to the Sony a7II and Sony a7s?

The a7RII has a more pro feel to it. For all purposed the a7RII exterior body is identical to the a7II in feel and texture. Both have a more beefier grip than the a7s and the same matte finish. External buttons and controls are the same too with the exception of a lock button that now resides in the middle of the top wheel that controls M,S,A,P etc. Its what’s inside the camera that make the a7RII a megapixel beast compared to the a7II and a7s. I’ve never used the original a7R nor even held it in my hands so I can not speak to the differences between the original a7R and the new a7RII. The one thing that sticks out to me that is quite different is the shutter sound. Its more of a soft mechanical Shushing sound reminiscent of a mechanical film camera. A welcomed and reassuring sound.


The menu system has some welcomed upgrades {9 frame built-in bracketing, bracketing with self timer and many, many more,} a new full-frame backlit CMOS sensor, in camera stabilization, amazing dynamic range, 4k video capabilities and the 42.3 megapixels {which have the ability to capture stunning clarity and detail} that is sending shockwaves through the photographic community. And yes there are 399 focusing points, on sensor phase detection for faster auto focusing, as well as contrast detection. The a7RII also allows any lens, Canon, Nikon, Leica, vintage etc. to be used on the body via an adapter. Essentially making its usage available every person who delights in using their favorite lens or lenses.

To see a full list of menu upgrades head on over to my friend and fellow Sony Artisan Brian Smith’s ( web page. And of course Silent Mode is built into the a7RII body so you can shoot in complete silence. No sound…not even a whisper.

The Proof

Although I pride myself on knowing the technical aspects and details of the craft of photography…for me the proof is always in the captured image. I’m simply blown away by the amazing detail and clarity of imagery I’m able to capture with the Sony a7RII and Sony lens line up. Now I know what all the fuss is with fan boys about medium format digital cameras. The detail and clarity is amazing. Each time I brought up an image on screen from the a7RII I would sit in front of my computer and go WOW! I’ve been photographing for 17 years now and for 15 years professionally. I started out with Canon 35mm, moved to a Hasselblad 503, then got the first Canon 1D when it came out. But never have I owned a camera this capable or seen this type of detail and clarity which is coming out of the a7RII.

Below I’ll share a few single capture images from the a7RII. Each image is captured RAW. I’m a RAW shooter period. Images are culled in PhotoMechanic and post processed in Lightroom 6.1.1 Crops are 100% to show the clarity, detail and dynamic range of each image. After the A7RII images I’ll discuss briefly why I have so many bodies and what I use them for.

IMAGE 1. Moab, Canyonlands National Park, Utah. a7RII, 90mm f/2.8 Macro G OSS, ISO 100, 1/125th/sec, f/6.3. Tripod.

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IMAGE 2. 100% crop.

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IMAGE 3. Maroon Bells, Aspen, CO. a7RII, FE 16-35mm f/4.0 Z OSS, ISO 200, 1/3 sec. f/16. Tripod.

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IMAGE 4. 100% crop.

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IMAGE 5. Independence Pass, Aspen, CO. a7RII, Sony 70-200 f/4.0 G OSS, ISO 400, 1.160th/sec, f/10. Tripod.

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IMAGE 6. 100% crop.

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IMAGE 7. Abandoned home, 1800’s Stage Coach town, Lake County, CO. a7RII, Sony 70-200 f/4.0 G OSS, ISO 400, 1/160th/sec. f/10. Handheld.

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IMAGE 8. 100% crop.

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IMAGE 9. Old silver and gold mining town of Leadville, CO. a7RII, FE 24-70mm f/2.8 Z OSS, ISO 200, 1/160th/sec., f/10. Handheld.

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IMAGE 10. 100% crop.

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IMAGE 11. 100% crop.

IMAGE 12. Enchantment Resort, Sedona AZ. a7RII, Sony 90mm f/2.8 Macro G OSS. ISO 200, 1/250th/sec., f/14. Hand held.

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IMAGE 13. 100% crop.

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The Verdict

The a7RII produces stellar, clean files with superb clarity and detail. I haven’t profiled the camera for my computer yet. But noticed that I do need to spend a bit more time getting the landscape colors where I wanted them. The files from the a7RII are almost 2x the size of my a7II and almost 4x the size of my a7s.

The only thing that I noticed on ingest into Adobe LR 6.1.1 is when building the previews, it took substantially longer than my a7II and a7s files. But that is to be expected when you are dealing with 42.3 megapixel files. When taking successive shots with the a7RII the buffer will take a while to store the images to the SD card. During this time menus can not be accessed. During my 12 days on the road and pressing the camera into use in severe locations with 102 degree temperatures I experienced ZERO glitches. The a7RII performed perfectly. Battery life appears to be the same for the a7RII as for my other a7 series cameras. Shooting in harsh conditions, sensor dust is expected and was easily blown off. Once during my trip I wet cleaned both sensors. Again, to be expected for 12 days of continuous outdoor shooting in harsh element.

The Proper Tool for the Job

As I mentioned above I have five different sites: my overall site, luxury real estate and architectural photography, pet photography, weddings and wine and food. During the course of a month I typically am photographing a weddings, family and children’s portraits, ridiculously wonderful pet photography ®, doing video and stills for wine and food, and several luxury real estate and architectural shoots destined for web and print. Often during the course of the month I’ll be photographing for magazines, both articles and cover images. And to satisfy my soul, I’ll throw some street photography into the mix.

Wedding & Family Photography

a7s can capture clean images up to ISO 51,200. Light is always changing and its my go to event camera. I may purchase a second a7s body. A7RII for portraits at weddings and for families and children – on a tripod. A7II is my back up camera for family portraits and children’s portraits – on a tripod

Luxury Real Estate Photography

a7s because of its low light capabilities and super clean files. a7RII for luxury real estate photography magazine work.

Pet Photography

a7s for quick focusing clean files in changing outdoor lighting conditions, and the a7RII, if it will be for a magazine cover work.

Wine and Food Photography

a7s for on location shooting 1080p video. And the a7RII for tripod macro stills and 4k video.

Personal Work and Street Shooting

The a6000 with the Sony Sonnar T* FE 35mm f/2.8 ZA. Super compact, highly capable set up and very discreet.

About Marc

Marc Weisberg is a photographer, photography educator and blogger based in Irvine, California. He specializes in a broad genre of photography including luxury real estate photography, wine & food, family events, and ridiculously wonderful pet photography. You’ll find Marc’s trademark – magazine style imagery published internationally in books and magazines. In early 2015 Marc aligned with Sony to become a member of the Sony Artisan of Imagery program. You can see more of Marc’s work at

Jul 212015

UPDATED: Light Painting ONE DAY Workshop in AZ Ghost Town, HALF SOLD OUT!

Sign UP HERE!!

Hey guys!

Just wanted to update you on what will be a hell of a night out in the Arizona desert as we shoot an old abandoned ghost town while learning all about light painting!

Join me and my good friend Alex McClure (who is an Olympus Trailblazer) as well as others as we head out an hour or so from Phoenix to a location Alex scouted out and found. Old buildings, ruins, and more await us and we will set up our gear, tripods and have sandwiches and soft drinks on hand as we experiment with steel wool spinning, all kinds of light effects and yes, traditional light painting.



This is a one night only workshop, as in, a few hours starting at 5PM on September 19th 2015. We will shoot in to the night and darkness and will come away with some new knowledge of light painting and fantastic photos. I have shot with Alex a few times and he knows his stuff when it comes to this, so will be a blast to get out with a group and shoot. I will have my Olympus and Sony cameras, Alex will have his Olympus gear and even new Olympus goodies to show. You can bring any DSLR or Mirrorless camera as all can be used for light painting.



If you are interested the cost is only $100 for this awesome night of shooting the night. We will include sandwiches and drinks and we will carpool to the location with Alex bringing a few and myself bringing a few and maybe 1-2 others driving behind us.





If you are local or near to Phoenix AZ, then you will NOT want to miss this! Will be a blast.

To sign up or read more, click on over to the official meetup page for it where you can learn more or sign up and pay to lock in your spot. Only 6 of the 12 seats remain! The 1st six sold in a few days, so I expect this to sell out soon.



Mar 282015

A Small Pit Bull with Balloons, an A7II User Report

By Brandon Labbe


Much like Godzilla in the 2014 movie “Godzilla,” I recently strolled through the streets of downtown San Francisco. Unlike Mr. Zilla, however, instead of being met with giant moth creatures that blew blue fire, I was met with dragons. Yes, you read that right, dragons! Monstrous creatures that breathe fire and eat every person they come across; at least, that is how one would describe wild dragons. Amazingly, unlike their wild counterparts, the dragons of San Francisco are very well-trained, as they simply stood in place waiting their turn to delight the crowds gathered for the Chinese New Year parade that San Francisco hosts every year a full two weeks after the actual lunar new year day passed, which is like seeing New Year fireworks on the 14th or celebrating St Patrick’s Day on Easter, and trust me, you do not want to celebrate St Patrick’s Day on Easter.

Heavy drinking and easter egg hunts are not a good combination. Of course, when one comes upon a dragon in the middle of one of the most densely populated cities in America, the logical course of action is not to grab your children and run, but instead to take out your A7II and take a picture. I know, we San Franciscans are a strange bunch, but I’d like to think that’s what most people would do if they saw a dragon, as opposed to follow Harry Potter’s lead and jump on its back, but enough dragon jokes, on with the A7II!

If the A7II were an animal, it’d be a lion, because it’s the king of cameras. Unlike a lion, however, it takes amazing pictures and instead of eating zebras it eats batteries. I know what you’re thinking, “please, no more animal jokes!” but this comparison is actually Sony-approved, because I’ve seen ads for the A7 series with a roaring lion behind the cameras, and I must say, an advertisement must be amazing to make someone describe it in detail in a camera review. Sony’s got some geniuses in their ad department. In all seriousness, yes, it eats batteries, in that I used to only need one where as now I need a second one in my pocket if I want the camera to be on all day. You see, I was expecting a horrific battery life based on reviews I’d read of the other A7 models, so the first thing I did with my II, straight out of the box, was put it in airplane mode, and two batteries lasts me an entire day. Battery life aside (and, again, even that isn’t bad), there is absolutely nothing wrong with this camera. Now, it’s not a perfect camera, because, as experts have echoed a thousand times, there is no perfect camera, but I believe you can only get so close to perfection. Can I drop the II out of a plane and expect to recover it without a scratch? Of course not, because whoever was passing by when it fell would snatch it up in an instant because it’s a perfect camera!

I’m not one who is well-versed in camera lingo, I just know a good camera when I see and use it. I could say it’s got a good build, a good sensor, weather sealing, nice grip. Hell, it can probably do your taxes for you. I didn’t really notice these things, though, because they just worked well. When something works well, you don’t really notice. That might seem like an odd statement, but to try to let you see it from my perspective, think of it like this: in movies, you know immediately when someone’s a bad actor because they make certain mistakes or are just all-around unconvincing. However when someone’s a good or even great actor, you almost don’t notice because you’re so subconsciously convinced by their performance that you forget they’re acting. If that was confusing, let me put it this way: you know when a camera is bad because you have a lot of complaints over it. However, if a camera is perfect or near perfect, you don’t really notice. It just works the way you want it to. It complements your style, it doesn’t get in the way when you’re not using it, it doesn’t disturb your or anyone’s experience with a loud shutter at a quiet moment. It doesn’t freeze, crash, miss autofocus, explode in your hand, etc. It really is easier to say what a camera doesn’t do than what it does. That doesn’t just apply to cameras, but anything. If something works well, you don’t really notice. It’s only when something doesn’t work the way it should that you notice. To apply this way of thinking to the II and other cameras and technology in general that I’ve owned, the II is the only thing I’ve never felt the desire to throw against a wall. Though that may seem like a silly thing to say, I assure you that is extremely high praise.

The thing about the body that did stand out, however, was the viewfinder. Though I don’t use the viewfinder to take pictures (see my reason here:, I find it incredible. Looking through your pictures with your eye to the viewfinder is like seeing your pictures in 3-d. Have you ever looked through a stereoscope (one of those old-timey 3-d viewers where you have a card with the same image printed twice and you look through the viewer and it looks 3-dimensional)? The viewfinder is like that, but in color and high-quality, and even though I don’t use it to take pictures, I look through pictures with it because it is just a phenomenal viewer. I wish it were detachable so I could plug it into my computer and view all my photos with it because it is just so incredible.

Then there’s the iso. The beautiful, amazing, incredible iso. 10000! Ten-freaking-thousand, and I still got a pic that I could print as large as I’d like. How many cameras can you say that about? And if you can’t tell which one of these I took at 10000, that just proves my point. Okay, I’ll just tell you because it actually looks cleaner than some pictures. It’s the photo of the with the clock tower in the distance.
For a review of the lens, the Zeiss 35/2.8, which may as well be welded to my II, I could sum up my feelings for it by comparing the pictures I take with it to balloons. They’re all colorful and pretty, but when the lens is especially sharp, the pictures pop. Just look at the pictures above to see what I mean.

Also, compared to other cameras I’ve used, pictures I’ve taken with this camera, not all, but some, seem to glow. I think this is a combination of the lens and sensor. I’m sure this sounds like a very amateurish observation, but it’s true. With the right light and shadows, some pictures seem to glow. I like the look so much, I try to find the right conditions to get that glowing effect in as many pictures as I can. I don’t have a very good example of this effect from the parade, but I’ve run into the effect several times in daily shooting around the neighborhood when the sun is just right. I don’t think I’m explaining myself well enough. When I say they glow, I don’t mean some of the pictures look smudged or that blown out highlights somehow look pleasing. What I mean is the way light is reflected and dissipates into shadows is like nothing I’ve ever seen in any camera I’ve used before. Perhaps this is just a full-frame thing – a light sensitivity that smaller sensors couldn’t hope to achieve, but I think there’s more to it than that. I think there’s something really special here, in the II, or maybe even the whole A7 series; something you can’t just be told about, but you have to experience for yourself.

The one flaw that I found was, as good as the auto white balance is in the day, at night it seems to favor a blue tint. This isn’t noticeable a lot of times, because night is rather blue anyway, but, looking back through photos now, and even at the parade itself, I noticed that the live view display and the resulting picture looked noticeably more blue than the scene before me. No great fault if you shoot in raw, but if you shoot in jpeg, I’d recommend going manual on white balance at night, or at least, only if it’s noticeable, because it only happened to me twice.

If you’re curious as to what settings I use, I have it in manual mode, and that includes iso. 95% of pictures are with autofocus, and the autofocus might miss only once in 200 photos, and even when it does, I don’t complain because the photo still looks good. I’ve heard some people have had a bigger problem with autofocus, that it ‘hunts’ sometimes, especially at night. I constantly have the lens in center focus mode so the lens always knows what I want it to focus on  I have the lens at a constant /5.6 because that’s the lens’ sharpest aperture. I only go wider at night or in close-ups.

Another thing I love about the II is how unassuming it is. I was surrounded by guys with fat dslrs and lenses thicker than my arm, and I actually enjoyed the condescending looks they were giving me, as if I brought a chihuahua to a pit bull fight. If only they knew.

To recap: my II is a pit bull the size of a chihuahua, and my pictures are balloons. I think that sums up the A7II/Zeiss 35 combo very well, a small pit bull with balloons.

Also I should note that the parade isn’t this unorganized. Most of the pics were taken before the parade actually started.











Dec 222014


Sixty Weddings with a Leica M 240

by Joeri van der Kloet

Hello to all of you! Thanks Steve for giving me the opportunity to share my thoughts with your readers again. I’ve posted a couple of times on shooting weddings with a rangefinder, but I thought it would be nice to give you an update.

I’m quite sure I’m a lucky person. 2014 was a crazy year and it’s not over yet. I just kept getting emails from people who were getting married and asking about availability. It was a very busy, yet immensely rewarding year. With an ever-increasing competition among (wedding) photographers this is something I don’t take for granted. I have found that staying true to the way I work does pay off. I don’t stage anything besides the group portraits and I shoot real moments only. Just snapshots of beautiful moments. Nothing more, nothing less. Sometimes my clients tell me it felt like I was just one of the guests, who happened to be there with a funny little camera. The M helps in this approach with its modest proportions, but behavior is just as important. I wear a suit if that’s the dress code, I mingle with the other guests and even my camera bag fits in. It may seem like just common sense, but you’ll be surprised how often this is forgotten.
Besides my documentary wedding work, the number of customers for my workshops are growing. Lots of rangefinder users are interested in the way I use my camera and they’re especially interested in my focussing training techniques. I really love this work, because I can help people to get more fun with their cameras.

In the last two years I’ve shot 60 weddings with my Leica M240 and although I already reviewed this camera here before, let me give you an update after many hours of shooting.
After having shot around seventy weddings with my M9s, a few years ago, I had gotten used to this camera. While I was on a four months journey around the world, I heard about the new M and I was quite excited, but also in doubt. A CMOS sensor? Liveview? Video? Seriously? Like most of you, the first pictures we saw that were taken with the new flagship were somewhat disappointing. Soon after that, the CCD vs CMOS discussion took off. And we’re still having this discussion today. Of course I also read about red skin tones, the lack of ‘crisp’, ‘pop’ and ‘3D’. However I also read that the M240 featured 2 extra stops in ISO sensitivity, a more silent shutter and a better responsiveness in general. For me, the increase in ISO sensitivity was enough to spend the 6300 Euros and start working with it.

The number one reason for me to work with the M240 instead of the M9 is ISO. I’ve really needed those two extra stops for low light circumstances. Even with a fast 35/1.2 I have used the highest ISO setting quite a few times. Of course the wedding receptions are the hardest moments to capture. As a rule of thumb I can freeze people who are dancing at 1/90th and at 1/60th, even though it will start to get slightly fuzzy, the look is very moody. People that are dancing slowly can be shot at 1/15th and still be sharp enough. By the way, sharpness is never my main concern. Emotion has top priority, then composition and only then sharpness. Flash is no option as far as I’m concerned, since I try to be as unobtrusive as possible. So for ISO only, I’d choose the M240.
Next is overall responsiveness. The M9 has a somewhat gritty shutter button, while the M240 has a clear two-step shutter button. The shutter itself is more silent and lacks the whining noise of the M9. Button wise, the M240 is more responsive, although I have heard people complaining about the start-up time. With my M, I have no problems with that and whenever I use my M9, it feels slower to respond on the buttons. Handling wise, I prefer the M9, simply because it significantly lighter. Don’t underestimate these 100 grams. You will notice the difference.

Much has been said about the M9 screen. Yes, it’s a joke, but it never troubled me. It was good enough to browse through the menu, check my histogram and check composition. If you’d want to check for sharpness, forget it. Though the M240 is not very good for checking for sharpness either (just compare it to the 5D3: now that works!) it’s a lot better than the M9.
But then the menus: I prefer the M9, simply because it’s more intuitive and easier to work with than the M240. Also, setting the ISO on the M9 triggers a clever menu: by clicking down you’ll increase one stop and by clicking to the right you increase your ISO with ⅓ of a stop.

Then there is the live view. First I thought I’d never use it on the M240. When I started using it, I discovered some benefits of this system. It always works, no matter how dark it is, whereas the EVF might get so dark that it’s almost too hard to focus. Live view also provides a way for very precise focussing. The drawback is that live view is very laggy. For me, during action it’s unusable, but for more static subjects it’s great. It’s also great for checking if your rangefinder is still calibrated properly. I do not use it a lot, but I wouldn’t want to miss it in a next M.

Battery life of the M240 is very good. With my two M9s I used to carry six batteries to a wedding. Now two is enough. So that compensates for the increase in weight of the camera itself. Sort of.

Issues then. The M9 has had quite a few and one more recent issue can be added to the camera: corrosion of the sensor. While the M240 has had its share of bad luck, it seems to be problem free at this moment.

The most important feature of a camera however, is its output and that’s what most people are talking about. It’s the CCD versus the CMOS. Yes, the files are different and everyone had to get used to these new files, myself included. Technically, the M240 files are superior: they have more dynamic range, less noise and they’re just more flexible. The issue with the skin tones has been fixed, though it never bothered me much. The M240 needs a little more punch than the M9 files: increasing the contrast a little is usually a good thing. For me, I’m really happy with the output the M240 delivers. Of course, you’ll have to shoot in raw, just like with the M9. Where the M9 really shines is base ISO. Those images, where light is good and focus is spot on are almost unbeatable. But as a pro I don’t shoot on base ISO that much. I don’t get to choose the light on a wedding and often it is dim, or very contrasty. So what do I want? Low noise high ISO and flexible files with a good dynamic range. And that’s what the M240 delivers. If you’re shooting in other circumstances and you don’t need to make any money with your camera, I can perfectly understand why you’d prefer the M9 over the M240. In fact, I still have my M9-P which I will keep as long as possible.

Maybe you don’t even need to make a choice between the M9 and M240. When I switched to the M-system, the M9 was the only full frame compact camera body in the world. Lots has changed. Sony has made the full frame compact system camera accessible for a much bigger group of people with the A7 series. I have seen many great reports about the A7 and A7s. Steve here rated his A7s as his number one camera! On the other hand: DSLRs have acquired features that make them more interesting for the documentary approach as well. The Canon 5D3 for instance, is just as silent as the M240 in its silent mode. Also, its AF-system is a lot better than the 5D2, which makes the 5D3 a pretty good smallish, silent camera for the documentary wedding pro. For me, I just like the way the M-system works with its simple lay out and its intuitive controls. I wouldn’t want to change that. Also, my M is my best marketing tool ever. Whether I like it or not, it sells.

So, in conclusion, can we finally say which camera is better? No, we can’t, because image quality should be one of the most important factors in deciding which camera to buy and this image quality can’t be described in numbers and sometimes not even in words. I just wanted to explain why I still prefer the M240 over the M9 after having read the renewed CCD vs CMOS discussion. Whatever camera you buy, get the one you can afford and just shoot with it. That’s what they’re meant for.

My wedding website:
My workshop website:

and now, the photos!

1 Magical moment. The couple started dancing on our tiny boat on the Amsterdam canals. The sun came through and I just knew I had the best job in the world. With 28 Elmarit.


2 The dance. They just kept dancing on this wedding and everybody had such a good time. Very low light, but I think I nailed it on 3200 ISO on 1.2 at 1/125th with the terrific CV35/1.2.


3 Bride getting ready. I love to use whatever there is available for natural framing. With the small but very good 35 cron.


4 The car. This bride just loved the classic Porsche 911 the groom arranged for their wedding. And it even worked with the dress. Shot with the CV35/1.2.


5 Intimate moment during one of the speeches. I’m constantly looking for these moments. With the 50 cron, my workhorse.


6 Waiting for the groom. While the bride was peeking through the window, this dog jumped on a chair and started peeking as well. I couldn’t have been happier of course. CV35/1.2.


7 The vows. This was an intimate outdoor wedding and the couple had ordered birds made out of paper from Japan as a styling detail. I decided to shoot the vows through this curtain of birds. With the tiny 28 Elmarit.


8 Father and child having fun. Shot at 6400 ISO at 1.2 at 1/60th. Is it sharp? No, but it conveys the message. CV 35/1.2.


9 Bride and groom and umbrellas. It was a rainy day and the couple moved from the wedding venue to the next venue. I liked this scene and shot it quickly. With the 35 cron.


10 I noticed this little moment just after the ceremony between the bride and her daughter. Shot with the 50 cron.


11 The moment after the kiss. Couples relax after all the offical things are done and you can tell by just looking at their faces. WIth the 28 Elmarit.


12 Soap and sunshine. During the ceremony it was dark and rainy, but when the couple got out the weather had changed completely. They were hugging each other and I liked this scene with its warm colours and all the reflections on the bubbles. With the 28 Elmarit.


13 The laugh. While returning from a group shot, the groom (probably) told a joke and the bride laughed out loud. I like the flare and the soft light as well. With the 50 cron.


14 The cake. This lovely couple just had a terrific day and I love the little moment with this interaction between the newly weds. With the 50 cron.


15 The look. The groom was listening very carefully while the bride was secretly looking at her husband-to-be. I love, love this light and the way the 50 cron renders the scene.


16 Magic light. When the couple walked towards their car after the ceremony they literally stepped into a ray of light. Smooth, warm, just beautiful. And the 50 cron has no trouble in rendering this scene.


17 Boy and car. When the groom went for a cup of coffee, the kid sneeked in the car, an Audi R8, and pretended to drive the car. I could hear him imitating engine sounds. With the 35 cron.


18 Smooth. The CV 35/1.2 is not just a low light lens. It’s also suitable for getting this smooth look. I’m not sure who the bride was looking at, but I just like this shot.


19 Friends. Well, this one doesn’t need any explanation. Best friends captured with the 50 cron.


20 Getting ready. I like the expression of the bride and the soft light from the window. Shot with the 35 cron.


21 The kiss. An intimate wedding with only twenty guests. Being able to mingle with guests is even more important than at big weddings. With the 35 cron.


22 Almost ready. After many years of shooting I’m still surprised that my clients give me the opportunity to capture all these delicate moments. Here the bride, probably quite nervous and so beautiful in the last moments before she’ll meet her groom. With the CV 35/1.2


23 Light from above. This couple lived on a boat with windows in the ceiling. When the groom stepped on board, the bride heard him and looked up, trying to get a glimpse of him through the window. Shot with the 35 cron.


24 The quote. While we were heading out for a boat trip we came across this quote and I quickly focussed on it. The groom turned his head to read it and I took the shot. CV 35/1.2.


25 Kiss me honey. The bride reaching for a kiss in a train somewhere in Rotterdam. With 28 Elmarit.


26 The first look. It was very narrow and I didn’t have much space to shoot the couple during the first look. Luckily, there was a mirror. CV 35/1.2.


27 Father and bride. Long after the wedding, this bride told me that this picture made her father cry. I’m still honoured she took the effort to tell me that. Shot with 50 cron.


28 Kiss and dance. Working with a rangefinder in low light conditions can be hard, but also very rewarding. The couple loved this shot and so do I. CV 35/1.2.


Oct 172014

Faces of the World Cup

By Caesar Lima – His website is HERE

Every 4 years the World Cup hosts 32 countries and an amazing soccer tournament in a different country. Since it was hosted in Brazil this time and being from Brazil and a photographer, I couldn’t resist making my 6 week trip down there into a project of capturing some of the excitement of this unique event. I decided to take mirrorless cameras because of their smaller size. I took a Sony RX-1, a Leica T with a 23mm and 5 M lenses plus a Sony A7r with 50mm and the new 70-200mm. I was able to take all this gear into the stadiums with no problem.

The games were held in different cities and I also ventured out into the streets and bars to capture the faces of the fans. There were amazing crowds of people from different countries, like a huge party. The Brazilian people are amazing hosts and they love to party. They were very proud to have all these visitors, the combination of great soccer games, 12 brand new stadiums, great food and lots of beer made it the best World Cup ever.

I feel very lucky to have been there and to have been part of such cool event.










Sep 102014


Shooting Ephemerisle 2014 with the Sony A7S and a Voigtlander 35mm f1.2

By Judd Weiss – Visit his site HERE

Most places I go lately, I am the best photographer around. But I come to Steve Huff’s site and community specifically because here I am definitely not the best photographer. I’m learning fast, but I’m relatively new to photography, upgrading from a point and shoot to the original Sony NEX 3 only about 4 years ago. Discovering Steve’s site almost 3 years ago was a major turning point in my photography. I started taking it more seriously when I saw what you guys were up to. I’ve been inspired. The daily inspirations that so many of you have contributed has made me rethink what I’m doing with the camera I’m holding. I’ve never taken any photography classes, but that doesn’t mean I haven’t received an education. This community around Steve Huff’s blog is one of the greatest influences on my development as a photographer. So thank you to all who have contributed their vision and creations here. I am very grateful. (Thank you Judd!! Steve)

I’d like to also make a contribution, from my favorite work yet. I shot this entire set of photos with the new amazing Sony Alpha A7S full frame mirrorless camera, with a manual Voigtlander Nokton 35mm f/1.2 lens. That combo allowed me to achieve low light shots never before possible in the history of photography. Ephemerisle was the perfect event to test out what the Sony A7S can handle in extreme low light. And the Sony A7S was the perfect camera to capture the experience of the dark glowy night that made Ephemerisle shine.


These shots are unapologetically processed, and I admit I went a bit intense with the colors, but I wanted to, to accurately reflect the surreal nature of Ephemerisle. Some of these photos are a little abstract, but believe me when I tell you those are very true to the experience. What a visual experience! Ephemerisle was incredible. I did the best I could to run around and convey what it was like to be there, over stimulated by this new beautiful foreign universe everywhere you looked.

It’s fair to think of Ephemerisle like Burning Man on the water. Imagine a bunch of RVs at Burning Man connected together, but floating. With dance stage platforms between them.


I think Ephemerisle was the most exciting and fun time I have had, that didn’t involve a girl, since maybe my college days. I loved running around in that crazy dream world meeting the cast of characters you’ll see in the photos below.

I’m not saying Ephemerisle is better than Burning Man. There’s no way an event of a couple hundred people can in any way rival the scope and all the amazingness of the 50,000+ strong Burning Man festival. But I will say that I enjoyed Ephemerisle more. I loved Burning Man, but the desert is a harsh place. No doubt the sea can be unforgiving as well, but I was very happy to trade an over abundance of dust for an over abundance of water.

No way I would bring my beloved new Sony A7S and Voigtlander lens to get ruined by the intense barrage of fine dust on the Burning Man playa.

 Shot at 12,800 ISO


Burning Man is incredible as it lights up the middle of the desert nowhere into an epic glorious city; being out in the middle of the water nowhere, lit up only by the most amazing glowy party you’ve ever seen, Ephemerisle too is a bright beacon of a testament to our evolutionary progress, while floating over the type of early ocean microbes of life that began it all. How far we’ve come, to create such a stunning atmosphere. A cool blend of excitement and serenity. Like Burning Man, being at Ephemerisle confronts you to face both our fragility and our promise that can only be truly seen in an intentional community that has left many of the comfortable constraints of modern society.

Stylistically people often compare Ephemerisle with Water World, and you can see where that’s coming from, only this wasn’t dystopian. Whatever was rough around the edges wasn’t post-apocalyptic, it was prototype. This is from the future, clearly. These are experiences our grandchildren will inherit when they are our age. But it’s a beautiful future. When the sun goes down, we light up even brighter. Humans evolved from a state of continual starvation in a struggle to survive among brutal nature, and now we master the harshest environments to throw parties of abundance like this for recreation. Humans have no shortage of serious problems, but it’s things like Ephemerisle that compel me to acknowledge our bright future of possibilities ahead.


You might think I’m hyperbolizing a little much. And if I hadn’t been there, that’s totally what I would think while reading this. But there’s a reason for these reflections of anthropological grandeur. Ephemerisle is comprised of exactly the group of intellectuals, business leaders, and artists who are focused daily on the topic of our evolutionary potential as a species. These ARE the people consciously working to design a more beautiful future for all of us. What a treat it is to see one of their early prototypes. And I have to say, I’m in love with this particular prototype they call Ephemerisle.

I’ve got to thank everyone involved for coming together to create Ephemerisle. They made these photos. I just captured what I saw as well as I could. Their vision created this reality. Congratulations to all of their beautiful minds. These photos are my humble tribute.

Ok guys, get ready to watch the colors move…………

The full album and original post can be found on my blog here:

You can follow me on Instagram at

I’m on Facebook at




Note: The widely acclaimed Canon 5D MIII could not have achieved many of these shots. For example: The below shot, while not the cleanest photo in history, was shot at 51,200 ISO (!!) at 1/125 second, handheld from a bobbing moving boat in the dark. It was challenging to stand, and hard to see clearly, let alone to take a clean photo. Try to get anything remotely usable in those conditions with another camera setup.


Again, the below shot is not perfectly clean and crisp, but it was shot at 32,000 ISO from a moving bobbing boat.


I love how the camera rendered the daytime shots as well.






































Jul 082014

The Sony A7r and project “Speak Soccer”

By Alex Kroke

Living in New York City my inspiration comes from all around, it was no different for Lisa and I with our project Speak Soccer. The premise of our idea began at the start of the Brazil World Cup 2014 while we were having lunch at an outdoor cafe talking about sports and fashion.

Lisa Capezzuoli is a creative graphic designer and art director of EVOL design, she wanted to create some artsy fashion , then we observed that the italian sports “Gazetta dello Sport” paper is pink, and it would be great to make it a dress . We then noticed how other International Newspapers were covering the event and the possibilities for design with the other countries.

Once we nailed down the idea of creating fashion around the way each country covers their national team in the press, the production process flowed easily. In the end we shot, nine models, from our friends circle, in “word” dresses constructed with newspapers from USA, Brazil, Germany, Italy, Spain, Netherlands, Uruguay, UK, and Argentina.

See more HERE.

The shoot was on a Sony A7r and the 55mm 1.8 tethered to a computer. 4 Elinchrom lights. Images below:











Jun 162014


The New Jersey State Fair with film and digital

By Jim Fisher – His blog is HERE

For the past few years I’ve been visiting and photographing at the New Jersey State Fair, held each August in Sussex County. It ís a true rural affair, complete with 4H and FFA kids showing off the animals they’ve raised, lots of fried food, and carnival rides.

This year was the first that I came armed with a press pass, which made it possible to get some close access to livestock judging and the Queen of the Fair pageant. I concentrated on these events for this trip, skipping over the carnival side of things mainly because my feet were worn out by the time enough darkness fell to make the rides really visually striking.

Caption: Kodak Portra 800, Canon EOS ELAN 7NE, Sigma 50mm F1.4 EX DG HSM


The Gear

I took a few cameras with me this year, a mix of film and digital. I was carrying the full-frame digital Canon EOS 6D along with Sigma 50mm F1.4 EX DG HSM and Sigma 120-300mm F2.8 EX DG IF HSM APO lenses, and a Canon EOS ELAN 7NE 35mm film body. The 120-300mm is a huge beast of a lens, but delivers a solid telephoto zoom range and is absurdly sharp. I also brought my trust Nikon F3 along with Nikkor 28mm f/2.8 AI-s and 50mm f/1.4 AI lenses, and a pair of compact digital cameras: The Ricoh GR and Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 II.

Caption: A young girl answers questions about her chicken during judging. Ricoh GR.


Chickens and Sheep

My first stop was to the pavilion that houses the chickens, rabbits, and other small animals. Cages line the walls and center of the building, each a temporary home to the animal awaiting judgement. I stumbled in just in time to come across some of the judging of chickens.

Caption: Sheep judging. Kodak Portra 400, Canon EOS ELAN 7NE, Sigma 120-300mm F2.8 EX DG IF HSM APO.


A middle-aged man called the 4H and FFA kids who had raised the birds up one by one, asking them questions about each, and taking down some notes that will determine the best in show. I moved outside and to one of the larger judging rings. There was a really bizarre sheep event going on. The sheep themselves were normal, but the handlers pair of humans ranging in age from teenagers through adults were all wearing matching plaid shirts. An older gentleman with a cowboy hat and a huge, huge belt buckle oversaw the judging and chose a winner.

Caption: Twin sheep handlers. Kodak Portra 400, Canon EOS ELAN 7NE, Sigma 120-300mm F2.8 EX DG IF HSM APO.


Queen of the Fair

Each year a Queen of the Fair is crowned: a local teenage girl who is paraded around the grounds in a tiara and serves as an honorary representative at various events throughout Sussex County over the next year. Iíd not yet seen the pageant that crowns the winner, but my wife (who was familiar with the event from her time as a reporter for the local paper) assured me that it was long and boring.

 Caption: Looking in at the Queen of the Fair pageant. Canon EOS 6D, Sigma 50mm F1.4 EX DG HSM.


But I still wanted to attend, just for the sake of curiosity. To me, pageants are just weird. Parading women around, choosing one above all the others, and crowning them just seems like something that’s out of step with today’s society. On the other hand, the winner gets some money for college, so there’s that.

 Caption: Miss Lafayette (T). Canon EOS 6D, Sigma 120-300mm F2.8 EX DG IF HSM APO.


I tried to shoot the pageant as darkly as possible, with grainy black and white film (Ilford HP5 400 pushed rated at ISO 800), and a grainy conversion to monochrome for any digital images. Basically, I was going for the antithesis of how typical coverage would be done, and when I saw that the pageant was being held in a dimly lit tent and that all the girls had armbands identifying them by letter (odd if you ask me), I knew that I wanted at least a few shots that isolated that visual.

 Caption: At the mic. Ilford HP5, Canon EOS ELAN 7NE, Sigma 120-300mm F2.8 EX DG IF HSM APO.


I used the Sigma 120-300mm and 50mm prime, with a mix of film and digital. A monopod was employed to steady the telephoto lens; the 120-300mm is too heavy to use practically without one, and it helped me get a steady enough shot at the shutter speeds I was limited to at ISO 800 and f/2.8. I’m glad I had it, because my wife was not exaggerating about the length of the pageant. I shot the first portion, which involved each of the two dozen contestants walking slowly to the stage and giving a prepared speech, and I called it a night.

 Caption: The Queenís Carriage. Sony Cyber-shot DSC-RX100 II.


And that was it for another year at the fair. I skipped the carnival portion this year and some of the other usual goings-on. But since it took me so long to put this post together, the 2014 fair isn’t too far off.

You can look at my 2011 and 2012 reports for images from those years. For more images from 2013, check out my Smugmug Gallery.

Jim Fisher is the Senior Digital Camera Analyst at He also posts photos, an occasionally finds time to write, at his personal blog,

Jun 122014

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A Wildfire Wedding – Story and Images by Josh Newton

See Josh’s website HERE and his blog HERE

Many of you have no doubt seen the very cool Wedding photo shot by Wedding Photographer Josh Newton. They have been aired on TV everywhere as well as gone viral online. If you have NOT seen them I would be surprised! It was an interesting day for Josh, and below he recounts the short but sweet story of how the day went for him, and his clients. One thing is for sure, he ended up getting some very memorable moments for the bride and groom. It is not every day you get married near a raging wildfire that is closing in your wedding celebration. Take a look at the images and story below, which is from Josh Newton’s blog and have been reposted with his permission. You can see many more of his photos at his website!


April and Michael’s Wildfire Wedding in Bend, OR

By Josh Newton

With the news picking up the wildfire wedding photos, the last week has been a little more exciting than life usually is. On Saturday, April and Michael’s wedding day started off like any other wedding as the two of them anxiously prepared for the ceremony, while friends and family put the finishing touches in place.

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Around 11am, a brush fire nearby turned into the Twin Bulls wildfire, but we had no idea that, later on, we were in for wildfire wedding photos.

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But unlike other weddings, just as April and her dad were preparing to walk down the aisle, firefighters tending to the Two Bulls wildfire came up with sirens blaring and told them we’d need to evacuate. Seeing that the ceremony was underway, the firefighters changed their minds… as long as we promised to cut it short for the safety of everyone. April was able to walk down the aisle to Michael. After a whirlwind ceremony, the two were happily pronounced man and wife!

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After the ceremony, while guests scrambled to relocate the reception to Drake Park in Bend, Oregon, I took Michael and April (who were just happy to be married) off to do some photos of the two of them. The results were more incredible than I could have imagined, and I’d never have guessed the quick photo I snapped with my iPhone (see below) would go viral.

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We caught some incredible moments that afternoon, and I love the way April and Michael grinned at each other, just happy to be married.

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The news, of course, is all about the wildfire wedding photos, but after 10 years of being a travel wedding photographer, I know the story is in April and Michael’s commitment to each other, and to their unflinching celebration of the life they have ahead.

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 Congrats April and Michael!

See Josh’s website HERE and his blog HERE

Apr 252014

Leica buys Steve Huff Photo!?!?! Whaaaat?


Hahahaha, got ya didn’t I? No, Leica has not bought this site even though a very few of you are leaving idiotic comments in my latest T review (see it here) implying that they did just because I loved the new T. I mean, really guys?

In any case, no..the site is not and has not been for sale and I will keep on and continue doing what I love to do here each and every day. That means that yes, more passionate reviews will be here over the years when something comes along that tugs at my heart and soul. Cameras that have done this in the past? Olympus E-M1 (where I was accused of being paid off by Olympus)..the Sony RX1 and RX1r (where I was accused of being in Sony’s back pocket)…the Leica M (where I was accused of just being a “fanboy”) or even the Nikon Df (where I was accused of now being a Nikon fanboy and paid by Nikon). Again, these are just comments from a very few, a teeny percentage of those who comment but it is absolutely ridiculous to even have one comment like this.

It is so funny to me that when I write a review with a lot of negatives or issues then people seem to get happy. Why is that? Are people just so negative and bitter that they love it when negative things are written? One reason I made the choice to NOT review cameras I do not like is because of this fact! See, I am ANTI negativity in life and ever since adopting this 5 years ago my life has changed for the better in every way, shape and form. A total transformation in my stress level (I have ZERO), happiness (I could not be more happier), and joy of life. It does not come from money (I am far far far from rich, live in a small cheap house in a not so great neighborhood) it comes from just being happy and knowing that we have one life to live here on this earth. Why ruin it by being bitter, nasty and negative all of the time? If you do not like something then so be it but to attack the messenger, that is nonsense.

Negativity come from jealousy, hate and an overall lack of happiness in life. It can be turned around if you really want it to.

To come to this site and leave idiotic comments such as “Leica must have paid Steve” or “Steve should change the name to” or “Sony paid off Steve” or “Olympus owns Steve“..well, those are just comments that spawn from hatred, jealousy and people who are just not so happy in life…or people who own camera brand A when I praise camera brand B, something that fanboys do to attack me when I am not so nice to their chosen brand.

Many people in life (and I come across many of them) love to put others down because in some odd way it makes the feel better for a moment or two. They feel like they know it all, when they know absolutely NOTHING about what they are commenting about! I always laugh when people leave expert opinions on cameras they have never seen, touched or used. It really makes me laugh out loud sometimes. My written reviews are from experience using the cameras, and I use ALL cameras even though I do not write about all of them. So my opinions are based on actual use. Does not mean you have to agree with me, as we are all different in what we like, but what you read is always my honest opinion. Period.

To those saying I have always been paid off by Leica, let me fill you in on a history lesson because yes, you need to learn as you know nothing about my situation with Leica.

Back when I started version 1 of this website I started it by reviewing Leica gear. The Leica M8 to be exact. I started this very website (over at the now defunct, with an “s” at the end) 6 years ago only because I loved the M8 so much that I wanted to share my love for it with anyone who would be willing to read it. I did NOT want to start a review site at that time, I just wanted to write down my real thoughts from the heart on that camera that was getting some bad press from those who never even touched one (users, not reviewers). Again, the know it alls who knew nothing about the camera! I was taking the best photos of my life with that camera and those little M lenses and I thought it was an amazing thing, even if it had IR problems and high ISO noise after 640.

So yes it had issues, (which I wrote about in that review) but for its time, there was nothing quite like it in IQ or Usability/Feel. For me, it was a revelation and made me want to go out and use it every day, and I did just that. To me, that is #1 in a camera before ANYTHING else and is why I despise bug DSLR’s for daily use. Sure DSLRs have great quality and IQ but when they are so huge and heavy with a decent lens attached it makes me want to NOT use them! So I fell for the M8 hard because at the time, it was the only thing around that was high quality and inspired me.

After writing the M8 review on the old iWeb blog I started something very strange happened. After just a few days I started getting e-mails from those who found and read the review telling me how much they enjoyed it. Many said they went on to order the M8 for themselves. “Wow” I said to myself. That is so cool. I was able to convey my emotions and love for this “electronic memory maker” so much that a few readers bought one! It ranked up on the 1st page of google after a few days somehow and people were seeing it and some people were buying the M8 due to what I wrote.

Then more time goes by and each week is a repeat of the last with even more emails. I’d say each week I would get double the e-mail about that Leica M8 review. It was crazy. Then something really cool happened. I received an e-mail from the music artist Seal telling me he really enjoyed my review. Then he said “we should chat sometime about it”. Now here I was, living in Indiana in a VERY small town in a VERY inexpensive house with literally NO income (was taking a year off after selling a small Ice Cream shop) and all I did was share my thoughts on a Leica M8 camera and I was getting e-mail after e-mail thanking me and now and e-mail from a guy whose music I used to jam in my car and home. How cool is that? I ended up shooting his Chicago show a couple of months later and it was an amazing experience for me, as that was one of my goals in shoot a concert like that with no restrictions. One of my images made his next tour program from that night.

As time went on Seal and I became great friends. He then introduced me to a Leica dealer named Ken Hansen who I immediately called to place a Leica order for the then new 28 Elmarit ASPH lens. I owned the M8 and then went for the 28 as my next lens to see how I would like it. Ken asked how I heard of him and I told him I was told all about him by Seal so he sent out the lens without getting payment up front. “Send me a check when you get it” he said. Wow. Amazing.

In any case I soon came up with an idea that would help benefit me and Ken but I had no idea if Ken would go for it as my site was so new with such little traffic. At the time there was no lens rental shop where I could rent Leica equipment so I asked Ken if I could rent lenses from him, review them and then send them back. I would pay him $50 or so for a week or two and in exchange he would get a link mention telling everyone that he supplied me with the lens. He was game for it and sent me a few lenses to try out. He told me he would send me used lenses if he had them and if he sent me a new lens he would sell it as used at a discount but he was up for seeing how it would go.

So I started reviewing Leica lenses on the M8 early on and each review got better and better and I really started to enjoy doing  them. No one online at the time was doing “real world” reviews. They were wall old school DP review tech style that were long and boring, to me anyway. None of them were done by anyone with real passion for photography. It was all about the money and business.  So I was indeed a bit different and was the very 1st real world review site that included all real world use photos, intense passion and even some personal posts that let everyone know just who I was and am. I even coined that real world term and because I reviewed in the style that I always wanted to see, and I was passionate at doing it it started to grow and grow. Much like the rock band KISS and how they started (now celebrating their 40th anniversary).

They started KISS because they wanted to be the band that they always wanted to see. At the time, most bands went up on stage in T-shirts and jeans and sang while standing still. KISS came out in makeup, outfits, and used fire and bombs while prancing around like maniacs. It worked because they brought excitement to the stage and with their passion and excitement at full force it brought the excitement level of the audience to the top. It was a great formula and one I used when creating this site.

I wanted to see a camera review site that I liked yet no one was doing it, so I decided after a few reviews to do just that and I dedicated myself to working on it every single day, and I did.

After the new reviews the site traffic was growing steadily and Ken Hansen decided I did not need to pay him a penny for the rentals. (as I was helping him by spreading the word about his services so he was getting a few orders). Ken has always been an amazing dealer and today I consider him the ONE guy that really made it possible for me to do this website, a true friend. Without his “rentals” early on this site would not exist today. Leica was no help at all back then and refused to even answer an email from me when I requested gear for review. That is, until traffic started to really grow and they started seeing the reviews and comments. Then they started to send me lenses by request and I no longer needs the Ken rentals ;)

As the new Noctilux came out, Leica sent me one to try for a few days. I always only had a few days, usually 2-4 days with a Leica product before they wanted it back. But I was just happy to get review samples. They then sent me a WATE for review.

As time went on Ken always helped me when he could and Seal helped me tremendously by inviting me on a couple of his tours and things just clicked. As I was on the Seal tour I met a ton of people who were fans of mine as well! It was so odd when walking in the airport one day with Seal and his band and someone ran up and said “are you…STEVE HUFF“! Lol. It was amusing to say the least. But that was not a regular occurrence. It happened sparingly but was still very cool to meet those who enjoyed my reviews and talk cameras for a bit.

So the more I shot with Leica the more I became attached to the cameras and lenses. I shot the entire Seal tours with a Leica M9, Noctilux and 35 cron. Many said I was nuts to trust it but I never had an issue that wasn’t fixable (until my noctilux fell apart during a show). I even managed to get an album cover using the M9 and Noctilux. So to me, Leica has always been my camera of choice due to MANY reasons, not just image quality. It has given me some of my best memories and usability also goes a long way with me. I remember  one night Seal handed me a Canon 1d MKIV or something like that and told me to try it out for a show. It was nice, it was HUGE, it was a beast and weighed as much as my Mini cooper. I did not like the experience of using it. I missed my M9 and manually focusing as it was a challenge. Snapping away with blazing AF and a zoom was NOT a challenge for me. It was boring and dull to me so I ditched that 1d and went back to the M9. Ahhh, heaven.

As time went on and the site grew and grew and more users were leaving comments, anytime I reviewed a Leica product I was called a “fanboy” by a few in the comments section. The Leica “haters” who hated Leica for one reason or another but probably because they could not afford it or because they see Leica as an “elite” brand who offer no value for the money, which is 100% not true BTW.  For the record, I was one who could never afford Leica but because I skimped on everything else in life I managed to get by with the M8, then M9 and a lens or two. I was not rich, not even close to it..not even well off but I knew that if I could own one thing it would be a Leica M. It gave me enjoyment in life.

As for the silly Leica hating commenters, for whatever reason they were always there, the minority of course, but they would come to my FREE site and bitch that I wrote nice things about a product that did amazing things for me. Made no sense. Over time I learned to laugh at these individuals as they were clearly so bitter in life that they felt better by attacking me. I would just reply with “I am a Leica fanboy 100%! I love their cameras as to me there is nothing like them and if that makes me a fanboy then so be it”!

As time went on I continued to review Leica and other camera brands that ticked my buttons. As Micro 4/3 was taking off with the E-P1 and GX7 one time Leica told me via email “stop reviewing that Micro 4/3 so much and write more about Leica”. This is from someone who is no longer with the Leica company but I responded with a chuckle like “yea, right”. I thought that was odd. But the more I wrote about other cameras the more I was ignored by Leica. Did not really matter to me at all but I thought it was a bit rude. I always had Ken to get my back if I need a product for review so all was good with me. Time marched on, Leica announced the X2 and Monochrom. I was invited to Berlin, surprisingly, to see the launch of the New revolutionary MM. I flew from AZ to Berlin (courtesy of Leica which surprised me) to witness the launch and I thought I would be able to test the camera so I could write a 1st look report and inform all of the readers here about the capabilities of the MM!

That was not the case.

When I arrived I saw familiar faces like Thorsten Overgaard, Eric Kim, Jono Slack, Sean Reid and many others who were also flown in for the event (though I think Thorsten drove). We all had dinner, had fun and attended the big shindig that night. What I saw was mostly over the top people with bow ties and suites, and from what I gathered, very rich people who were also acting the part. Nothing at all like me or my personality. I said to myself “So is this the real Leica? Not many here are anything like me..maybe they do want these cameras for the red dot and the prestige”. It was clear many there did only want that but there were also a handful there who were just like me, passionate about their cameras and photography. All was not lost.

I walked the room and was stopped every few feet by someone who recognized me from my reviews. I chatted with those people and had a great time. Then the camera was launched and then it was over. What? I do not even get to touch an MM? I flew across the USA to Berlin for a 3 hour event without even getting to touch a Leica MM? I was surprised by this for a few reasons but one of them was because a few of the guys I know who also write reviews.who were here..well, they all had an MM (besides me and Thorsten) in hand, with them. But when I asked my contacts at Leica they gave me a quick “let me see what I can do” and then ignored me and dodged me most of the night. Even my then buddy Seal called one of the top Leica guys and said “you really should get a camera into Steve’s hands so he can review it. It would be beneficial”. But no luck. I did not expect to take home an MM for review, just to hold one, fire off a few shots. I mean, they had them there but for some reason was not allowing me to see one. So why fly me there? Just thought it was odd.

At the end of the night I went to my room and wrote a report on the event and mentioned there were no cameras to be found for me to try. Maybe they were not happy that I was covering the launch with my Olympus E-M5 :)

The next morning it was magically arranged for me to test an MM camera. It was presented to me in one way but the reality of it was that it was set up by Leica through a third party to allow me ONE HOUR of use of the camera, with a chaperone. :)

That was good enough for me as I spent that hour walking the street of rainy berlin and was able to report on the camera so all of the readers here could see some info and my input on it. It was perfect and worked out great.

I was told I would get a review sample soon. But that was drug out and I was one of the last to get one for review. It was fine with me though as I did not care, I just wanted to review it. Besides, Ken Hansen would have helped me out if Leica didn’t so it did not mater to me. In fact, I preferred to go through Ken at this point and did purchase one from him.

Fast forward to the M. By now Leica was not sending me review samples anymore. In fact, my one contact there was gone and no one wold reply to my emails. I remember even Thorsten Overgaard trying to figure out what was happening and he called Dr. Kauffman on my behalf to tell him that they should really set me up with a contact in the USA for review samples. Still, no go though I was invited (but not flown out) for the M launch after Thorstens phone call. But I could not make it as it was the same time as my Photo Cruise! No M 240 review sample for me…

…So Ken hooked me up with the M 240 as I was put on his pre-order list as soon as I knew it was in the works. In other words, I was at the top of his pre-order list because I put myself there before anyone. I may have been 2nd or 3rd but I was able to by one from Ken. So I did a huge review of the M 240 (here) praising it as the best thing ever, and to me it was and still is (I still own it)! I love this camera. During that review there was so much hatred from Leica bashers and I was called the same things by those same few people and a few new ones who could not fathom the value of an M…”fanboy”, “Leica paid off Steve”, etc. Little did they know that Leica was not even communicating with me at this time and they did not even send me a review unit yet I was hearing things like “Steve gets free cameras from Leica, that is why he is positive to them“. But I let it bounce off of me as always and did not care as I still loved the Leica M 240 and knew it was the camera for me and I would never change my stance when it is all based on honesty, as all of my reviews are. If there was any bitterness between me and Leica that did not mean I would hate their camera, not at all. If it is good it is good. Expensive yes, but for me worth it.

Then came the X-Vario where I tore it apart and exposed the weaknesses and praised the positives. I was hard on it because it has a few issues that bothered me in real world use, though IQ was not one of them. After that review I had emails from some saying that I pissed off Leica! How could I piss them off if I was just being honest? Being honest about a camera is how it should be so the companies can FIX the issues in a later version or with firmware. Same thing I did with Fuji. I was hard on them because they had issues, real issues that other cameras did not have, at least in my eyes. They fixed just about all of those now in the X-T1. That is how companies get feedback. But a few of these camera companies are something else. Write bad things and they ignore you (as Fuji does with me to this day) but write positive things and they love you. Them moral of the Story is that I am always honest in what I write, it comes from the heart. Any excitement you see or read is legitimate and is how I truly feel. I could care less if that means a camera company stops sending me review samples because today I can just buy or rent them if I want to review them.

Paid off by anyone I am not.

So with the X-Vario I predicted a sales flop and it was/is. I predicted the X2 would not even come close to the X1 sales, it did not. I predicted the X1 would sell in did. I predicted the M9 and M 240 would do very well, they did and are. So my track record is good when predicting Leica sales.

With the new T I predict a winner for Leica. They WILL sell a ton of these just as they did the original X1. I say that not because I am paid off by Leica, but because I truly feel that after using the new camera for just a a week. It is a good product and as I said in my review, to those who like to own nice things, including a camera, then the T will be appealing to them. There is nothing wrong with the T, it is a highly capable camera and produces beautiful files from the camera. I could also care less if the sensor is older..even if it was 10 years old I would not care as long as it performed, and it does. Plain and simple. Is it the perfect dream camera? NO! Not even close but it is the 1s Leica to break ground and be original, and yes, it is original in its build, feel, in use and quality.

When I made the Sony RX1 my camera of the year for 2102 I was labeled a Sony fanboy .When I made the Olympus E-M1 the camera of the year  for 2013 over the Leica M, I was labeled an Olympus fanboy and many wondered why I did not make the M 240 my pick. When I tore apart the Fuji X-Pro 1, I was labeled a Fuji hater who only loved Leica and Sony. When I praised the Nikon Df I was instantly a “Nikon fanboy” which made me laugh out loud. I mean, to those saying these things..are you really that miserable in life that you have to sit around on web sites like mine just to make bitter and mean comments that have zero truth to them? Does it really make you feel better about yourself? If so, then you may need help. :)

I mean, ridiculous statements and comments that are not only rude but disrespectful to me..the one who works day in and day out to provide FREE information while getting very little back in the way of monetary compensation. I do this as it is my a passion of mine. Something I love to do. I live a simple life in a small cheap house, a small car and not much in life besides my cameras and HiFi because I love it. I would not have it any other way as it is a part of me. If you do not like what I say then there is an easy solution! DO NOT READ what I write! Go on, I dare you! The funniest thing is that those who complain always come back for more. They can not get away from the site and read all reviews I write. I guess that is why this site now enjoys the success that it does. The haters are even regulars :)

No matter what company makes a camera..if it is good and gets me excited to shoot it then I am in and will state my honest feelings about it.

As for me and Leica, well yes they did supply me with the T for review but in all reality, they had no choice. Look at the review. It has now had over 150,000 views and well over 400 comments in about 28 hours. That is a HUGE amount of exposure for them and the new camera. If it was a bad camera I would have said so. It is what it is! I am happy to work with any and all camera companies to test and do real world reviews of their products but beware, I will be honest. Like I said, it is a passion of mine and I will never go through the motions and rush a review. When I really like something, wether that is from Leica, Sony, Olympus, Nikon, etc then you will indeed know it.

So there you go. To all of you who have been coming here over the years I thank you all for your support, friendship, kindness and help in keeping this baby of mine going. To those who come here to bitch and moan, I do not feel you should come here but I appreciate you as well as yo do indeed add to my hit count at the end of the day! To those who will be offended at what I said here then I am guessing you will leave a nasty comment (never fails) in reply yet again. Well, it will be deleted if you do or not approved. Not dealing with it and it has no place here (one guy who felt offended and said I aimed my post at him dared me to approve his comment..seriously?). Don’t like it, move on back over to the other sites that welcome such nonsense and hate.

I hope you all have a great weekend and see you back here on Monday! BUT there is more to come today so check back later :) I will be out this weekend with the Mitakon 50 0.95 for E mount with the A7 and new A6000 (which is pretty sweet BTW).

1st test shot with the A6000 and Mitakon 50 0.95 at 0.95! This lens will focus as close as .5 meters. 



Jan 032014
Three weeks, four weddings and one dementia sufferer, with the help of the new Nikon Df       
By Mark Seymour

As a wedding photographer who primarily specialises in Jewish weddings, using a predominately reportage and journalistic style, I use the Nikon flagship camera the D4, with a selection of prime lenses.

But recently I was provided with the Nikon Df and it was great privilege to have the opportunity of trialling this beautiful retro styled camera from Nikon, in real life situations, where the pressure was on for me to deliver.

I initially played with the camera for a week adding some poignant black and white images to my personal project covering my fathers’ decline due to dementia. Once I felt confident with the controls and features I was excited to try out the Df for capturing my professional wedding images. I must admit I did revert to my D4 at the point where the high tempo dancing takes place at both Jewish and Greek weddings had begun because I wanted to feel totally comfortable, as you have less time to think and I needed the higher focus speed of the D4. That’s not to say the Df is a slouch, with the focus system borrowed from the D610.

Overall Impression

It’s a beauty, with overtones harking back to the classic days of film and the great Nikon cameras like the F3 and the Fm3. Nikon have done to this camera what we have seen happen to the beloved design of the mini, in taking the look of a camera with nostalgic memories and installing it with their flagship digital camera’s sensor, to enable photographers to have the best picture making experience.

This is Nikon’s lightest full frame camera at just 710g with beautiful retro dials on the top plate and a 16Mp sensor inside, but also includes a small LCD that gives battery info, shutter speed, aperture selected and number of frames left along with a great LCD and shutter lag to a professional standard. The shutter is also the quietest, which is often a bug bear with the D4 during wedding ceremonies.

ISO is sometimes difficult to know on the dial without confirming what it is in the viewfinder, especially in low light.

Image Quality and Buffer

I’m blown away by the qualities of this sensor, the dynamic range is superb and you can shoot anywhere up to 204,ooo ISO with the buffer not to the standards of the D4 so if you are a photographer who shoots in high bursts, at times you will hit the buffer limit

Below is a selection of images taken with the Retro Nikon Df in real life situations as well as a link to my website.

 Nikon Df , 10,000 ISO, f1.8, 800 sec



Nikon Df, 10000 ISO, F4, 80 Sec



Nikon Df, ISO 6400, 200 sec , F4



Nikon Df, ISO 6400, 200 sec , F4



Nikon Df, ISO 4000, 500sec , F2.8



Nikon Df, ISO 4000, 100 sec , F4


Nikon Df, ISO 4000, 125 sec , F4.5


Nikon Df, ISO 2000, 400 sec , F1.4 85 mm lens



Nikon Df, ISO 3200, 200 sec , F4. 85mm Lens



Nikon Df, 3200 ISO, F3.2, 500 Sec



Nikon Df, 2500 ISO, F5, 25 Sec



Nikon Df, 4000 ISO, F3.5, 60 Sec



Nikon Df, 5000 ISO, F4, 60 Sec



Nikon Df, 5000 ISO, F4, 125 Sec



Nikon Df, 1600 ISO, F2.8, 200 Sec 35mm 1.4



Nikon Df, 1600 ISO, F1.8, 200 Sec. Nikon 50mm 1.4



Nikon Df, 1600 ISO, F2.5, 320 Sec.. 50mm f1.4



Nikon Df, 1000 ISO, F2, 100 Sec. Nikkon 85 mm 1.4




Dec 172013

The Valley of Fire Workshop! February 21st-24th 2014


We are now SOLD OUT and this is with extending the group to 14! That means I sleep on the couch! 

OK! With all of these new cameras released and now in the hands of all of YOU what better than to join me on a cool weekend workshop in a gorgeous area of the country where we will hike, shoot, chat, learn, eat and stay in super deluxe accommodations. YES, I am excited about this one and can not wait to go back out and shoot with some of you as it is always a great time.

Along with myself we will have Jay Bartlett doing instruction as well as being our guide. Jay joined me on one of my LA Workshops and gave instruction on shooting models to everyone in attendance, and it was great. Todd Hatakeyama will join in as well (the Cruisemaster from the 1st ever Steve Huff Photo cruise) for the fun and adventure and to set up the details to make sure it all runs smoothly.

There will be a lot of hiking, photography, arches, caves, and amazing colors. We’ll see as much of the park as we can in 2-3 days. Possible locations include: Elephant Rock, White Domes, Arch Rock, Fire Wave, Crazy Hill, Pretzel Arch, El Portal Arch, Piano Rock, and more.

There will be a fair amount of hiking, so be prepared for at least 8 miles each day through trails and some semi-rough terrain. Don’t worry too much if you’re not in the best shape. We’ll break into groups according to hiking ability. We will provide 2-way radios, bottled water, snacks and a suggested list of gear. For all of you who have seen images from these locations online for years and years and have always wanted to BE THERE..well, now is your chance, and of course, we will be doing it all in style.


Tentative Schedule (to be finalized in the next two weeks) and some details:

As always with my workshops, we make sure we have a “TON O FUN” and this one will be no exception :)

This time we will be staying in a mansion with plenty of space to roam :) 


– 10 bedroom mansion – 12 guests max (once we sell 12, that is it)!

– single rooms are limited

– we’ll have a caravan of 3 suv’s or vans 

What’s included:

– 3 nights at the mansion

– light breakfast and picnic lunches are included on Sat and Sun

– guided tour of the Valley of fire for 2 full days

– bottled water, snacks

– possibly pickup and drop off from airport (if our schedule permits)

all other meals are not included


Friday – arrive late afternoon – meet at the house, we may be able to pick people up from the airport (would fly into Las Vegas airport)

(those coming from Southern California can meet up to carpool Friday morning)

Friday evening – Dinner

Saturday and Sunday, shooting from early morning until sunset. Light breakfast snacks and picnic lunch.

Sunday night – people can fly out after 8pm, or stay the night and leave Monday morning

(for Southern California people, we’ll head out mid morning)

How much does it cost and how do I get in? (we are 100% SOLD OUT)

if you want to join the fun and come away with some amazing photographs, some new skills and some new friends and great memories then make sure to get in quick before this sells out. History shows that every single workshop I have done has sold out and usually we have more wanting in AFTER they sell out. I do not do too many of these and this time I am teaming jump with Jay and Todd to make sure this one is run smoothly and provides all of the cool stuff you would expect.

If you want in, the cost for a single private room with everything above included is $1000 for the three-day event. If you do not mind to share a room with someone the cost is $700, but private rooms usually go fast so if you are interested, and want a private room, email me quick! 

Payment will be done via paypal or if you do not use paypal we can do other payment methods. Paypal is preferred.

If you want in, e-mail me HERE and I will instruct you on how to pay. Once you are paid up you are locked in and all set! This will be a great time and I am looking forward to it. I may be able to even bring some goodies along for all to try (which I will confirm here when I know for sure).

Hoping to meet and see some of you there in February!


Nov 252013

Prints for the Philippines


Hey hey! It is Monday and I figured I would start the day with a good cause that can help so many in need. Neil Buchan-Grant, who has contributed to  this site on many occasions has started up a website called “Prints for the Philippines”  in where photographers can offer their prints for sale with 100% of the proceeds going to help the victims of the typhoon. Here is what the site says

“A collaboration of concerned photographers selling photographic prints to help the Typhoon stricken people of the Philippines. All sales go to the DEC Typhoon Appeal. New photographers being added daily. To see the current photographers, their unique offers and our team’s progress, click on “contributors” below”

So go check it out HERE and see if there is any way you could help out! They need people who want to buy prints or submit work to sell to raise money!

Thanks, and more to come today so check back!


Nov 132013


Burning Man Portrait Report

by Jordan Blackman – His website is HERE

I was riding shotgun in a pickup truck for twelve hours, biting my nails as we lumbered across the American West. Between the bed of the truck and the U-Haul trailer hitched up to it, there was easily a two bedroom apartment’s worth of stuff with us. But we weren’t headed to an apartment. We were going deep into the dust of Nevada’s Black Rock Desert.

Burning Man 1

Now, you’ve probably heard about Burning Man, and maybe you’ve even been. But I never had, and I was anxious about going. I’d heard stories about dangerous dust storms, outrageous orgies, deviant witchcraft and more. Obviously, I’d need to bring a camera and the biggest memory card I could get my hands on.

Unfortunately, my OM-D EM5 had just been stolen. I had shot with that little Olympus for over a year, and paired with the Panny 20mm it really knocked my socks off. I love that camera. But still, I decided I’d try something different. After an obscene amount of internet “research” I picked up a Sony NEX-6. I liked the video quality and price, and I felt that it would be fun and educational to work a new sensor size. Burning Man was going to be my first chance to really use the Sony and I really wasn’t sure what to expect… from the event or from the camera.

Now, one of the big differences between the two cameras is the weather sealing. OMD has it, NEX doesn’t. Burning Man is famously dusty, and so I rigged a plastic bag to keep out those tiny sensor demons. It worked really well, especially with the EFV exposed, as you can see from the pic. The downside was that I was committed to a single lens for the entire week. I chose the Sony SEL35f18.

Burning Man 2

Upon arrival at Black Rock City, the name of the temporary town erected in the desert each year for Burning man, I was completely overwhelmed. The expanse of light and art, the creativity on display, the diversity of color and costume… it was more than I could take in. Burning Man defeats one’s power’s of perception, let alone observation. I quickly decided to focus on portraiture for the following reasons:

1. It would keep me focused, preventing overwhelm.

2. It seemed a reasonable task for the 50mm equivalent lens I had.

3. Portraits could be gifts, and gifts are an important part of Burning Man culture.

4. Everyone else would be shooting the giant art installations anyway, and who needs another picture of the man burning?

And so, every day I walked across the dust and invited strangers to have their portraits taken. Here are some of those photos. Below the pictures, I’ll share some thoughts about the NEX-6, some 2000 captures later.

So, what did I think about the NEX-6 compared to the OM-D? They are both great cameras, and I recommend them both. With the NEX-6, when you nail the shot, you get an amazing RAW file, better than the OMD’s. But, it’s harder to nail the shot and then it takes more adjustments to get the image you want from the RAW. With the OMD I had more keepers and less work to do in Lightroom. I think the keepers come from the stabilization and the better focus system. The NEX-6 forces me to slow down and think more both during exposure and development phases. I consider this a good thing for my growth as a photographer. And when you take the time you get some remarkable results.

If you shoot video, the NEX-6 can produce absolutely stunning footage, albeit without the OMD’s excellent stabilization. I consider 60fps a must for video since the conformed footage looks so great at 24fps. If the community is interested I am happy to write up a long comparison with the pros of each as there is much more to be said on this. The short version is, I’m planning to stick shooting with the NEX-6 until a camera arrives with 5-axis stabilization and the video features I want.

As for Burning Man, I’m no longer nervous. I’ll be heading back whenever I have the chance. My overwhelmed feeling has turned to gratefulness. My anxiety into anticipation. I hope to continue my portrait project for many years to come.

Burning Man 3

Burning Man 4

Burning Man 5

Burning Man 6

Burning Man 7

Burning Man 8

Burning Man 9

Burning Man 10

Burning Man 11

Burning Man 12

Burning Man 13

Burning Man 14

Burning Man 15

Burning Man 16

Burning Man 17

Burning man 18

Burning Man 19

Burning Man 20

Burning Man 21

Burning Man 22

Burning Man 23

Burning Man 24

Burning Man 25

Burning Man 26

Burning Man 27

Burning Man 28

Burning Man 29

Burning Man 30

Burning Man 31

Burning Man 32

Oct 242013

Some images from Photo Plus in NYC today. Sony, Zeiss, Leica…

What a day! Whew…

Yesterday I flew out of Sunny AZ at 6am headed to NYC for the Photo Plus show going on this week. When I arrived in NY I did a big “UH OH” because I realized I only brought a light jacket with me, and here I was in NYC in 48 degree weather! The good thing is that it was not THAT cold so I survived a short walk to dinner with some friends and had a great evening. As always, I had a camera with me so for the chilly walk back I snapped a shot or two..


This morning I woke up later than I expected, around 8:30AM. Had a business phone call at 9 through 9:30 and by the time I headed out to the show it was 10:30.

On my way I had to take a picture of myself in front of B&H Photo, the “Candy Land” for photo and tech geeks!


I only had a 15 minute walk to the convention center from my hotel, and was cool that B&H is one block from my hotel. Makes it too easy to spend money though!

As I walked I snapped a few shots with a fisheye that I have been playing around with…



When I arrived to Photo Plus I saw a few familiar faces and made my way to pick up my press pass.

I ended up walking around and it seemed every few steps someone who knew me would walk up to me to chat! Was so cool to meet so many readers of this site today, all were super nice and wonderful people.

I eventually found my way to the most crowded section of the show (from what I saw) and it was the Sony Booth. They had the A7 and A7r on display, as well as the new RX10 (which is  looking better and better to me the more I mess with it). I even had a chance to borrow a Zeiss 50 1.5 Sonnar from a woman who was testing some old lenses on the A7. She was kind enough to let me take a shot or two with her lens mounted on the A7.

I snapped a shot of a guy who was chatting with me (a reader here) at 1.5, wide open. Sony would NOT let me put an SD card in the camera (they are saying the camera is still not FINAL in FW, so pre-production) but when I saw the playback it had the full on Zeiss character and was beautiful. I am telling you this..the camera was a breeze to manually focus with this Zeiss ZM lens. No focus shift because you are using Live View, so what you see is what you get.

The OOF transitions were creamy, the color was nice for being indoors with horrible light and I can tell that this camera is going to deliver on IQ, no doubt in my mind at all. After more hands on time with the A7 and A7r I can tell you that yes, the A7r does have metal dials on top where the A7 has plastic. They both feel great and I noticed no difference in feel or build when in my hand. I have a feeling that the a7r is going to be the Godzilla of resolution. A beast.

Shot with the 50 Zeiss Zm Sonnar at 1.5


So after messing around and chatting with a few folks a woman walks up from Zeiss to show me the new Otus lens. This lens is a statement piece from Zeiss and coming in at $4000. The 55 1.4 design is gorgeous but man, this lens is HUGE (though light).

She wanted me to try it on the A7r and I used the Metabones Adapter to do so. When I looked at the results on the screen..WOWOWOWOWOW. This lens is something the perfectionist will want. Those who want ultimate IQ..this lens will do the trick and seeing that it is a pro manual focus lens (NO AF), it feels REALLY good in use. It is just large.

I HEARD MUMBLINGS…Sony was telling Zeiss..MAKE THIS FOR FE MOUNT! So we shall see. Below is the lens with hood attached and Metabones EF to E mount adapter. I may get to shoot with this lens on the A7r NEXT WEEK and this time, with an SD card in the camera :)


So as I left Sony I headed toward Nikon, Canon, Fuji and Panasonic. Not much new there. Saw the GX7 but I already reviewed it here. I saw the All weather Nikon 1 which was larger and much more solid than I expected and I saw a few other things around the convention center that were more interesting than what Nikon was offering..



I stopped by the Olympus booth and they were busy with everyone checking out the E-M1 and even E-P5. I saw quite a few walking around today with OM-D E-M5’s and E-P5’s. The woman above was doing an act for Olympus demoing their wifi smartphone/ipad remote feature. Before I shot this I cracked a joke which was probably not good because she could have lost her concentration :) But she didn’t. Behind here you can see every Olympus Micro 4/3 and 4/3 lens ever made.

The Leica booth had a few gawkers but they were not showing anything new besides their “Glossy Black” D-Lux 6. Yet another refresh of the same old D-Lux 6 which appeared to be slapped together just for the show..I mean, they had to have SOMETHING new right?

They did have this on display…


I stopped by Fuji as well and took a look at the new X-E2. Looks and feels like an X-E1. Same build. AF seemed faster but not a dramatic difference. The new 23 1.4 was fantastic though.  This is a lens I would buy if I owned a Fuji. Smaller than you think as well.

So after the show I walked back to my room, stopped off at B&H Photo once again and am now laying in my hotel bed writing this update. What I learned today from Photo Plus is that there is MASS interest in the Sony A7 and A7r as well as  the new RX10. Olympus is hot with the E-M1 and Nikon and Canon are still Nikon and Canon with their usual DSLR updates. (yawwwn)

Leica is holding steady with M sales doing very well for them and Panasonic had quite the crowd as well.

So without a doubt, the biggest thing here this year is the Sony A7 and A7r. Sales are STRONG, results are looking AMAZING and the camera is well made, solid and has very fast AF. When something this good comes along, it gets noticed and the people I spoke with today who were giving it a spin all said the same thing..”I pre ordered one already”. They were all happy with the fact that they did.

Remember, starting on the 28th I will have loads of samples and news and videos on the new A7 and A7r and RX10, so bookmark and come back because you will NOT want to miss it.

For those wondering, all photos posted here were shot with an Olympus E-P5.


I will beheading back to the show tomorrow morning to throw a Voigtlander 12mm on the Sony A7 and A7r and to see what I see on the LCD. Of course, what I see you will see here right after :)


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