Oct 052015

Canon EOS M Review (Or Why I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Camera)

By Jonathan Acierto


Hello Steve and Brandon,

The Canon EOS M got a lot of bad reviews when it first came out. It was basically dead on arrival due to all of its shortcomings and perceived lack of effort on Canon’s part to design a camera that could rival the other mature mirrorless system cameras from Sony, Olympus, Panasonic, and Fuji. So when it came time to choose a mirrorless camera to carry around to replace my Sony RX100 compact, I chose the Canon EOS M. Why on earth would I choose the apparently worse mirrorless offering? I’ve been using it for a little while now and, even with all its shortcomings, let me explain why I’m happy with the EOS M.


When the EOS M was first released, it was originally priced for retail at about $800 for the kit with the 22mm f/2 pancake lens. Ever since the camera flopped, the price has been dramatically reduced to about $379 for the same kit on Amazon, and even less for the body only. You know what that means: really low used prices. Heading over to the fantastic KEH, I was able to get an EOS M with the 18-55mm kit lens for under $300, less than I paid for the RX100. Even compared to the entry level m43 cameras, the EOS M is a steal. Kudos to all of you who have enough disposable income to buy top of the line mirrorless cameras and glass from Leica, Sony, Fuji, Olympus, Panasonic, etc. Reading headlines of people who have multiple mirrorless cameras and can buy f/-1.0 lenses for all of them makes me jealous. But for the rest of us folks who have a limited amount of disposable income, price is and always will be a major factor.




While the photographic community has shunned the EOS M, the video community has embraced it and it has become somewhat of a cult video camera. I was originally looking to get a camcorder, but entry level enthusiast camcorders with relatively larger sensors start around $1,000. I simply wasn’t interested in getting a consumer grade camcorder due to the small sensors, hence the lack of DOF control. Entry level HDDSLR’s and high end superzooms (like the Sony RX10) have become a great value for getting professional looking video, but they are still relatively bulky and the ergonomics aren’t the best for video. Action cameras are tiny and can withstand all kinds of abuse, but they are just not designed for shooting everyday videos of your kids (unless your kids are surfing or riding a dirt bike and you want to get footage from their point of view).

The EOS M has became a popular camera to use for video because it has a large sensor which enables it to get the same DOF control as HDDSLR’s, it has a mic input so you can get better audio by connecting a much higher quality mic, and it is very compact and light weight, perfect for run and gun video shooting. Years ago I had a Canon Rebel T1i and I loved using it for video, but it didn’t have autofocus or tracking focus in video mode, so I had to manually focus. After a while, manual focus became a real chore. If I was a DP or first AC, I’d probably do a better job with manual focus, but I’m just not that good. The EOS M has auto and tracking focus in video mode. It’s not perfect by any means, and other mirrorless system cameras have better auto and tracking focus in video, but the EOS M is still better in most situations compared to my crappy mannual focusing. Keeping the aperture closed down a bit to get a deeper depth of field helps too. While having a razor thin DOF in a still photo is all the rage nowadays, having a razor thin depth of field for long lengths of time in video footage is now cliche and tends to get really monotonous and hard to watch. Video is a whole different art compared to photography, all you have to do is pay attention to what you see in movies and on TV. In the video world, shallow DOF is used very sparingly.



Operational Speed

Trying to use the EOS M like a DSLR or enthusiast camera sucks, and sometimes it can be painful (sounds like the complaints about the original Fuji X100, doesn’t it?). I’m used to just pointing the camera towards the subject, half pressing the shutter button to acquire focus, and pressing the shutter button all the way down once the camera gets focus. With the Sony RX100, I’m able to get focus and snap a photo or 2 of people on a sidewalk while I’m in a moving car. Letting the EOS M decide what to focus on is a crap shoot, it could focus on the correct subject fairly quickly, or it could take a while to hunt for focus. The slow focus is the main reason why the camera has been criticized so heavily.

Then I had a revelation: the EOS M was designed for regular consumers who are used to a smartphone touch interface. This may be obvious at first, and many reviewers mentioned this, but it’s easy to forget if you’re an enthusiast or professional who normally uses a DSLR, mirrorless system camera, or other more advanced camera. Once I started using the touchscreen to focus, the camera felt much quicker to use. Using the touch screen to focus, then pressing the shutter button to take the photo, works much like my iPhone. The EOS M also does a fairly decent job tracking the subject once you acquire focus via the touch UI. It’s also much quicker to change settings (white balance, ISO, etc.) using the touchscreen compared to using the physical buttons and wheel to dive into menus. People always complain that camera interfaces are stone age, but Canon designed a pretty good touch interface for the EOS M, and reviewers complained it’s too touch oriented for more serious photographers. Go figure.

The biggest slow down after getting over the touch UI focusing seems to be after pressing the shutter button all the way down. The camera takes almost a full second to write to the memory card. I’m not entirely sure why this process is so slow, as the camera can write 1080P video at 30fps to the card without any slowdowns. Is it annoying? It can be, especially when I’m trying to fire off 2 or 3 shots quickly as I do with the Sony RX100 or Canon 6D. Does the slow write speed stop me from shooting the moments I’m trying to capture? No. I actually think the slow write time helps slow me down and be more selective of my shots. With my Canonet QL17 GIII 35mm film rangefiner, I have to wind the film after every shot, so I’m used to not being able to take shots in quick succession. With the EOS M, I’m shooting more in the Cartier-Bresson, wait for the decisive moment style, rather than spraying and praying.

Hagerstown Road Trip 10-3-2015 - 1 of 1

Image Quality

It’s good, what more do you need to know? Just look at the photos. We’re at a point where any camera with a sensor 1″ or larger can take fantastic photos, the only limitation is the quality of the lenses. While the native EF-M mount lenses aren’t professional L glass quality, they’re good. I’d even say they’re better than the older, pre-STM Canon DSLR EF-S mount crop sensor lenses I’ve used. The EF-M 22mm f/2 STM (35mm full frame equivalent) is certainly as good as any of the mid level Canon EF USM prime lenses, it’s about 1/4 of the price, and it’s tiny. Putting this lens on the M makes it almost as compact at the Sony RX100. I don’t plan on using the EF-M 18-55mm IS zoom lens much for stills, but it’s more than good enough for shooting 1080p video. The image stabilization really helps to eliminate vomit-inducing camera shake.

Huntington Pioneer Festival 9-27-2015 - 1 of 1

Closing Thoughts

For all the talk of the convergence of stills and motion in one camera, it still hasn’t quite happened yet in the enthusiast/professional space. In the consumer world, I think the iPhone and smartphones have become the only camera normal people need for stills and videos, making smartphones true convergence devices. That leaves pros and enthusiasts as the only people left who are willing to spend money on a separate camera and/or camcorder.

Mirrorless system cameras have changed the stills world and HDDSLR’s have changed the motion camera world, so it makes sense that the newest convergence cameras will be a combination of those two devices. Mirrorless system cameras are gaining better video capabilities all the time, but Canon started the HDDSLR revolution, so they are coming at the mirrorless world from the opposite direction of taking the HDDSLR video capabilities and cramming them into the EOS M. They did a good job, all they need to do now is match the stills photography performance of their entry level DSLR’s. I think they’re getting there; the reviews for the third generation EOS M3 have been very good. Canon has had plenty of time to improve the M since the original was released 3 years ago. The reviews of the M3 have been so good that Canon decided to release the M3 in the US after initially announcing they wouldn’t. A couple more iterations of the EOS M and they’ll not only catch up to the other mirrorless cameras, but they may even surpass them. In the meantime, I’ll have my EOS M in hand, capturing fantastic videos and photos and having a blast.

All the photos included with this review were shot with the 22mm f/2 EF-M STM lens. For more of my photos, please visit my Flckr page:


Jonathan V. Acierto

Oct 012015

Shooting mushrooms with the Schneider Tele-Arton 270mm f/5.5

By Dirk Dom

I bought this lens for my Linhof Technikardan 23 to be able to shoot close ups. This is a big lens, and the optical system is a tele, so that bellows extension on the camera is a good deal less than 270mm at infinity. It’s also an older lens, the shutter times go 1 sec, ½, 1/5, 1/10, 1/25, 1/50, 1/100, 1/200 and there it stops. I paid $200 for the lens.


Diaphragm is thirteen leaves, which makes it pretty much round all the time, the lens stops down to f/32. It’s a big lens, weighs more than a kilo.


With the Technikardan I shoot 6×9 rollfilm. The 270mm is equivalent to 115mm on full frame.


Today I tried it out, on mushrooms.

I shot my beloved Kodak Tmax 400, pushed to 800, no filter.

Two things were new in my outfit:

To be able to get very low, I had put the ball head of my big tripod on a wooden board, so I could shoot from about 23 centimeters (nine inches) high. Normally, to get that low with long shutter times, you’d use a beanbag, but with the Linhof I have to exchange the ground glass for the film holder and I need to keep the camera absolutely immobile.

The second new thing I tried was the Gitzo GT 1543 T 6 layer carbon travel tripod. This tripod, which had cost me $400 used, I had taken in the Redwood forest in the vicinity of san Francisco, proved incredibly sturdy for its two pounds and a half and I decided to try it with the Tele- Arton at full extension of the camera.

My ball head-board and the Gitzo tripod worked beautifully, and the lens is like a dream come true. You haven’t seen bokeh until you try medium and large format.

But no doubt you’re waiting for the photographs. In three hours I shot sixteen images, six mushrooms. I bracketed a bit because the light was difficult and I shot in rapidly changing light under trees. Here are the good ones:

image020 image021 image022 image023 image024

The nice thing about film is that even very high contrasts don’t burn out. It’s all smooth and creamy. The mushrooms in the hollow of the tree were real dark and I had difficulty focusing. (It was a 8 sec exposure at f/5.5) You have to know my name “Dom” means “stupid” in Dutch. Well, I earned my name this time. I got the marvelous idea to put something contrasty and shiny at the mushrooms. So what did I do? I took the stainless steel dark slide out of the film holder and put it there. Putting it back, I discovered the naked film. Woops! Shot ruined. Next time I’ll take my car key or bring a small torch haha!. Shooting a technical camera is full of such things. There are no safeguards, everything that happens is your own fault.

Scanned on an Epson V750 flatbed at 2,400 PPI, Silverfast software, which works great.




Oct 012015

Leica Monochrom 246+ 35 LUX

By Danny

Hello Steve and Brandon

I just got back from a beautiful town called Acre. It is a very old town where I especially  love the old arabic part mostly. You can find the best Humus in the world there :)

Lately I hardly see Leica photos being posted on this site, , mainly Sony A7!!  photos (from Steve: Because Sony has new cameras to cover, Leica does not at this time). It is no doubt a wonderful camera but I still love the Leica rangefinder cameras , it still feels like old film cameras to me unlike all the other brands. I love the Leica viewfinder, the feeling of the camera in my hands. I love the manual focus and the camera sound.

In short I am hooked on Leica cameras as well as on their fantastic lenses. Yes it is all very insanely expensive but so are cigarets(I don’t smoke, ) people spend a fortune on getting ill, but when it comes to cameras …… I took my beloved Leica 246 ( what a fantastic camera) + the 35 Lux with me.

Here are some shots, I do hope you will like them.

Take care








Oct 012015


Leica is not just for Street

by Jesus

Hey Steve , love your website. I’ve sent you a few images in the past but never submitted any so here goes…

I recently had surgery for a torn adductor muscle so I’ve had time to do a little web surfing.

Funny thing most articles I’ve read  on the old inter web insist Leica rangefinders are strictly to be used as street photography instruments.

Apparently I didn’t get the memo. I’m a machinist by trade and I think that’s what drew me to the Leica M. I’ve been fortunate enough to own a dozen M bodies and 3 R bodies and around 50 lenses.


And I’ve never shot street photography.

I’m also amused by the comments that only dentist and doctors used Leica’s so here’s a few images that I’ve been fortunate enough to shoot with friends and live in muses

First Two Images

Leica M9 50 MM Asph



Amber Leica M8 75 APO



M9 50 Lux


And finally
Live in muse and friend

Leica M7
50 Lux
Agfa 100 APX


Abrazos ~ Jesus

Sep 292015

The Sony A7R (Mk 1) in Japan

by Michael Morris

Dear Steve and Brandon:

I have been reading your site daily for the last few years and have enjoyed reading your reviews and guest posts. I started my venture into the mirrorless world from Nikon with the purchase of the Leica M9 and 3 Leica M lenses in 2010. I tried micro four thirds and APS –C sensors and came to the conclusion that I am a full frame shooter. Over the last year I made some changes in my list of cameras. I sold my Olympus OMD–EM5, my Fujifilm XT-1, and my Leica M9. I now have a Nikon D800E, which I use for portrait work and sports, and a Sony A7R which I use for travel or when I want to travel light. I am anxiously waiting for my A7Rii to ship.

I recently traveled to Japan and brought my Sony A7R with the Sony/Zeiss FE 55mm f 1.8, Sony/Zeiss FE 35 mm f 1.4, Leica M 90 mm f 2.0 APO, Leica Super-Elmer 21 mm f 3.4 (borrowed), and my Nikkor G 14-24 mm f 2.8. I strongly considered purchasing the Sony/Zeiss FE 16-35mm for the trip. In the end I decided to bring the Nikkor zoom despite its size, and use something that I already owned. I used Novoflex adapters for both the Leica and Nikkor lenses.

Here are some sample photos.

Shibuya Crossing – Sony A7R with Nikkor G 14-24 mm f 2.8 ISO 200 1/250 sec


Sumo Wrestling Close shot – Sony A7R with Leica M 90 mm f 2.0 APO – ISO 1600 1/640 sec f 3.4


Sumo wrestling – Wide shot – Sony A7R with Leica Super-Elmer 21 mm f 3.4 – ISO 1600 1/100 sec f 3.4


Leica Store Tokyo – Sony A7R with Sony/Zeiss FE 35 mm ISO 200 1/100 sec f 5.6


Mount Fuji taken from the Shinkansen Nozomi at 170 mph Sony/Zeiss FE 35 mm ISO 200 – 1/200 sec f 4.0


Lobby of Ritz Carlton Kyoto –Sony A7R with Sony/Zeiss FE 35 mm ISO 200 1/4000 sec f 2.0


Maiko – Sony A7R with Sony/Zeiss FE 35 mm ISO 6400 1/250 f 4.0


Kinkaku-ji (The Golden Pavilion) Kyoto – Sony A7R with Sony/Zeiss FE 35 mm ISO 400 1/640 sec f 4.0


Michael Morris MD

Ocala, Florida USA

Sep 282015

USER REPORT: A7RII + Zeiss 35 1.4 Distagon FE: A weekend in Connecticut

by Jesse Hsu

Hi Steve,

After falling in love with the A7s and using it extensively for the past year, I was curious about the A7RII’s low-light capabilities as well as its stabilization to see if it was worth the purchase. ​ Borrowed the A7RII for a weekend trip to Connecticut to assess its performance. I only used the Zeiss 35 1.4 Distagon FE lens.

This shot was taken in the backseat of a car going 75mph on the highway. I wanted to test out the 5-axis stabilization and took a quick snap of the biker in the lane next to us. Not the sharpest obviously, but not bad for a handheld shot.

1 - Biker

Went out to the backyard and snapped this photo. After opening it up in Photoshop later, I was blown away by the clarity and level of detail. Leaves and tree trunks were sharp and I was able to recover some shadow with ease. Note: No additional sharpening in post.

2 - trees

Went grocery shopping at a local farm for dinner and snapped a sheep who was patiently posing for me. Again, impressed by the clarity of the blades of grass as well as the wool of the sheep when zoomed in.

3 - sheep

As night fell, my friends were getting the grill hot and ready on the porch outside. A great opportunity to test the low light capabilities. There was one light source, an overhead lamp but the sensor performed with no issues as it captured the flames in action and preserved the details of the charcoal piled high in the chimney starter.

4 - grill

I took the next shot as the branzino began to crisp. Notice the criss-cross pattern of the fish scales as well as the powdery soot all over the grill.

5 - fish

Cornish game hens slathered in miso and gochujang were next on the grill.

6 - hens

The next morning we heard some chirping and found some baby birds camped out in the backyard gazebo. The wonderful minimum focusing distance of the 35mm 1.4 allowed me to get pretty close to the subjects and shoot wide open at 1.4 for a heaping of creamy bokeh.

7 - birds

Few friends came by for a dip and the fast boot up time of the camera allowed me to quickly freeze a moment in time. Note the cascading water droplets as clear as day.

8 - swim

Water-skiing in the late afternoon meant another great opportunity to test stabilization. All of the shots were taken on a boat going pretty fast and I was happy that there wasn’t much blur. No tripod used, all handheld. I shot some 4k video but haven’t had a chance to check out the footage in Adobe Premiere.

9 - lake

Conclusion: After putting the A7RII through its paces, I was happy with the results. It preserved amazing detail in low-light scenes and situations where there was considerable movement. I will be ordering the A7RII soon!

More photos (mix of A7, A7s, A7rII) here: www.instagram.com/scrumphsus

Sep 282015

Traveling Light – Big Fun with little cameras!

By Rob McKay

Hi Steve and Brandon, as always great work on the site! I love these tiny pocket cameras so figured I would submit some snaps from them to your fine website.

Ricoh GR

This has to be my all time favourite pocket camera. I love the ergonomics of it, the size is perfect, the layout in my opinion is also perfect. Keeping the body clean, and the lack of external dials, buttons and knobs means I rarely screw up a shot due to something getting moved or switched on or off.
A few snaps with Ricoh balancing on some rocks.



Sony RX100 III

Another awesome pocketable camera, and after looking at a few snaps I made with it, I am kind of missing it. Tiny powerhouse of a camera, but I ended up selling it because it was cutting into my Ricoh time. But thinking I might need the IV!



Sony a6000 + E 16mm 2.8

Obviously the a6000 is a system camera, but it is pocketable as long as you have the right lens on it. In this case the cheapo 16mm.




Rob McKay – https://www.flickr.com/photos/caughtintheair/

Sep 232015

Leaving Mexico City

by Alejandro Ilukewitsch

Hi Steve,

Soon I will be moving out of Mexico and wanted to share with you and your readers some of my pics from my stay in this wonderful country.

Mexico is great city for street photography, people is warm and definitely like their portrait been taken. It’s a huge city, in which it only takes a bit of luck to bump into something interesting to shoot. I focus mostly in street portraits, but also managed to get some other things :).

I used different kinds of cameras Nikon DF, Sony A7ii, and Leica M240. No specific reason for the cameras, I just love all of them :)

Exif data should be intact. Hope your readers enjoy these pics as much as I enjoyed Mexico, and if anyone is thinking of passing through here a few days, please don’t doubt it, you will be surprise how great it could be.

DSC_9732 (1)







L1008370 (1)



L1006586 (2)








Sorry for posting so many :)

More of my pictures can be seen in:


Thanks for looking!

Sep 222015

The Ricoh GR: London & Scotland

by Justin Press


Hello Steve & Brandon,

Further travels with the trusted Ricoh GR (Mark I). Nothing to add to the words and feelings given regarding this little machine. I nearly gave in to the x100T and maybe one day I will but for now still trying to be the best I can with the GR.

London, Scotland and the railway grandeur b/t Victoria and Dundee.







Yes, yes my terrible watermarks are a distraction and my frames are not the best but hey I’m trying to shoot not decorate. Any advise on a watermark would be lovely.




Sep 212015

A night of Post Processing

By Dirk Dom

What a night!

I did ten black and white shots of my San Francisco trip.

At first, I got all crazy about printing big and I wanted drum scans made. Since that, and printing four feet would see me bankrupt, I used my own scans and enjoyed these.

I’ll print 12 x 18 inches, 30 x 45 cm, on Baryta paper. With my own scans I can go to 24 inches, 60 cm at 300 DPI.

This was a night of calm creativity and intense concentration.

Ansel Adams, the greatest printer that ever lived, said: “the negative is the score, the print the performance”. I performed tonight.

I’m deeply grateful I can do this.

The tools I use would make any Photoshop specialist laugh so hard he’d get cramps, but I use them until I can’t make the print any better. I do burning and dodging, a little bit of levels, mainly to check if I reach the black and white limits (ALT key), that’s all. Of course the images need spotting. Photoshop is as refined as you want, no limit.

Usually I have a very vivid idea about the potential of the print and what I want it to become, getting there is usually not difficult but takes lots of time.

Well, here they are, I didn’t include shots of the city because buildings don’t fit in this series.

This one I made very high key to offset the jet black charred stump and the rest of the Redwood forest.


Here I think I got the range of light in the forest.


Another jet black stump.


The bank of a creek in Ukiah. This shot is so sharp you see every thread of moss on the trees. It screams “Enlarge me BIG!!!”


My son.


One afternoon, the clouds were just magic in Ukiah. I was out for hours watching it all evolve.





Finally, I include this city shot, because of the nice sky: San Francisco from Bernal Heights. I think that’s the best view of the city.


I’m so glad that last year I decided to go for film and not for digital black and white. There are always beautiful structures in the negative, often totally unexpected.

Like the cloud in the San Francisco shot:


No way you can get such a thing digitally! (Does Nik software emulate this? I’d like to know) Such structures make a print glow. A print shows this sort of detail, to discover and enjoy.
I think there is nothing more beautiful in photography than fine black and white.

Well, enough.



If it doesn’t look good as a thumbnail, it’s no good.



Sep 182015

Lamborghini and Leica

By Olgun

Hi Steve,

I’ve been reading your site recently and it helped in my decision to go for a Leica M Monochrome, the first generation. I was really nervous about it, having always used DSLR’s. I am an automotive photographer and thus only use those big SLRs with seriously big and heavy lenses. I thought the Leica would be for me and my personal work only.

Well the other day I had a chance to go for a meeting with a client and they had a Lamborghini Huracan in there so I took along my Mono and took some snaps and thought wow, this camera is wonderful at all things, below are some examples I shot all very natural,

I’ve also included a link to my folio which is all my usual commercial editorial work, I’d love to share this sort of story with your readers,













Sep 182015

Photo’s with a Story

By Dirk Dom


When I show people my photographs many ask me what exactly they are seeing. That is a reasonable question, because I shoot quite a lot of abstracts. I generally tell them to appreciate the images on their own grounds. Most people, however, expect photographs to be representative and are not accustomed to having to use their imagination.

I made a booklet which originated as an exercise in playful interpretation of my photos. I picked out about seventy that I particularly liked and challenged myself to create tales inspired by the images. It proved surprisingly difficult. Some of my images seem so simple and have such an impact that I couldn’t think of anything. In some cases I made up stories; in others I wrote down impressions inspired by what I was looking at — what ever came to mind, and sometimes, when the creation of the photo itself was a good story, I shared that too. At random intervals I had left the reader/observer the opportunity to make up a story himself.

This is an excerpt of the book with ten photographs.


The photo above is exercise one. What does it make you think of?

Alien Encounter

A Star Seed floats through space, on its way to the core of the Galaxy to reproduce. Its solar sail is folded up, so far away from any star.

A Guffaw, who normally eats cometary cores, sees the Star Seed as a delightful snack.

The Star Seed reacts to its approach with a giant electric discharge. Intense plasma wires light up in the interstellar medium.

The Guffaw changes its mind and its direction.

The Star Seed floats on, on its journey of millions of years, on track to another star.

With thanks to Larry Niven


Brown Dwarf Life Form

DENIS-P J082303.1-491201 b, part of an ultra cold binary system, has a mass of about 28 Jupiter masses. This brown dwarf is 67.7 light-years or 399 trillion miles from Earth. It was discovered in 2013.

The life which developed there consists of twenty-mile long single-celled organisms (hydrogen filled bubbles made out of polyethylene) who float in the atmosphere and are bioluminescent. These are colonized by photosynthetic organisms. Seemingly there are similarities with the life on Jupiter.

The photograph is made in May, 2144, by the Da Vinci atmospheric probe which flew through a life form, filming, during its descent to the core.

Exploration of brown dwarves is considered a low priority.


Drowning Moth

Beginning of March, 2014, I walked in the Zevenbergen Forest, Ranst.

On the banks of the ditches you can make photographs with lots of contrast, so I walked along the water.

About six feet from shore, this drowning moth. I planned to save it, but first, a quick photograph. A first image without paying attention to composition. Then, this image, with the moth carefully lined up in the dark reflection of a tree. I wanted to take a few more photographs, but the wave pattern the wings made stopped after about five seconds and didn’t start again. I was disappointed. Suddenly I realized the moth was dying and it was finished.

Quickly I looked for a branch, but the only one I found was too short. Pity. The moth no doubt served as a protein rich delicacy to a bird or a frog. It’s a beautiful, but sad shot.

Life is so easily extinguished.


Nuclear blast

I was happily taking shots of forest anemones when World War Three started. The bomb incinerated the Antwerp port at twenty miles distance.

I live, but what good does it do? The anemones bloomed for the last time.



Microvilli (singular: Microvillus, lat. Villus “brushy hair (from animals), wool”) are microscopic protuberances of the cellular membrane which drastically increase the surface of cells. Microvilli are found in the brush border of the small intestine. Because of the large surface macromolecules and ions can be absorbed more easily.

The brush border is the homogeneous layer which is visible at the apical side of the enterocytes (absorbing cells in the small intestine) and the epithelial cells in the proximal tubulus. If this tissue is looked at through a light microscope, one can see that the brush border consists of a great number of very closely stacked microvilli. These microvilli make for a twentyfold increase of the small intestine surface. This increase in surface makes the intake of nourishment much easier.


Me, as a Photographer

This is a fun one.

So I went to take this photograph. At first I wanted to go alone, but I took my sister Nadine along to take the shot.

I hung about ten camera’s around my neck and arranged them in such a way that they showed nicely. But this hopelessly entangled the straps.

After about five minutes the forty pounds of camera started to really hurt and I wanted to take them off.

I couldn’t unknot them. The weight became unbearable. In the end I had to lie down and make my sister disentangle them.

I don’t want to think about what would have happened if I had done this alone.


Love is:
Putting your paws on the eyes of your beloved.



This is how the Daft Punk music looks to Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo.

The Visisonor, developed by the University of Antwerp in 2017, translates the impressions of the other senses to a visual signal.

Apple bought the patent.

In 2019 110 million Visisonors were sold, despite the violent price tag.

With Thanks to Isaac Asimov


Second Exercise

Oh, yes, believe it or not, this is a photograph!

I can’t make up any story with this.

Can you?


Well, hope you enjoyed it!

And, my apologies!



Sep 162015

Shooting the streets with my Pentax

by Lukasz

Hi my name is Lukasz. I’m from Poland but I live in Ireland since 2005.

My childhood is a period of communism. That was hard time, and the cameras usually came from the Soviet Union, from our “friends”. When I looked at the photographs when I was young, that was another world, sometimes escape from reality. At the beginning I thought not about to take pictures, I just liked the watch them. Later, after the change of regime when it was already much easier and cameras were available, I lost interest in photography. When I get older I bought my amateur camera, and that was the start of my passion. When I started the adventure of photography I did not think about the lenses or the full frame. I did not have a favourite photo subjects, but after some time I became interested in street photography and street portraits. Generally decisive moment speak to me the most, ordinary people in an ordinary world, tired faces of everyday life. Maps of life written on their faces that everyone interprets differently. For me the most power in photography is multiplicity of interpretations. No one can tell another person what is good and what is bad. Everyone has an opinion and can defend it. With curiosity I look at people and their kind, which I try to capture in my photos. Each portrait is different, and each moment is unique, so I try to photograph so as to capture what at the moment is the most unique and unusual.










I used pentax k20, but now I use k-5 and usually my favourite lens pentax 77mm ltd. 1.8 but sometimes 35mm 2.4.

Greetings Lukasz.

My facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Photography-by-Luca/588506824581547?ref=tn_tnmn

Sep 162015

Ireland with the Olympus E-M1. A Photographic Journey

by Tom Ohle

My name is Tom and I’m from Ireland. A few years back while visiting my beautiful fiance in Canada I kicked my love for photography into over drive!

Your site is fantastic and largely responsible for fuelling my love for photography. For me it’s the equivalent of a great cup of coffee first thing in the morning.

These next two images are from my favourite place of all. The west coast of Ireland in Co. Kerry just off of the Dingle peninsula at a little place called ‘Inch Strand’. It’s a spectacular part of the world with huge wide beaches as far as the eye can see.

EM1 + Nocticron
“The Kite”


EM1 + Nocticron
“Misty Beach”


The west coast of Ireland (particularly Co. Kerry) is known around the world for its spectacular cliffs. If you ever make it to this part of the world check out Sleigh Head.
This next one was shot overlooking the peninsula. I set out not knowing what to expect and stumbled across this huge hill that overlooked the main peninsula providing a stunning view. I improvised a quick fashion shoot – lighting was very overcast – perfect natural soft box!

EM1 + Nocticron
“He left me in Ireland”


For the most part I like street photography and travel portraiture but I try not to pidgeon-hole myself into a particular genre. I’ve taken my camera and lenses around Ireland and the great white North in Canada. From portraits of random people on the street to portraits of wolves and wolf dogs I generally always have a camera in my hand.

EM1 + Oly 45 1.8
“We need to talk”


I find that the images that I am most drawn to from your other writers tend to have people in them. Either obvious images of people directly or may not so obvious images of landscapes that show the mark of peoples involvement. In more recent times having read some of Neil Buchanan Grants posts here I’ve been inspired to approach my subjects and subject matter from the perspective of a travel photographer. Even in my home town I try to ask ‘ what would be really cool and interesting about this place that I could show somebody in a completely different part of the world ‘.

EM1 + Oly 45
“Who are you lookin at?”


Em1 + PanaLeica 25 1.4
“Violinist on the street”


Busking and street performing are very popular and a large part of Irish city culture. A walk down Dublin’s Grafton street on a Saturday afternoon is an explosion for the senses. Stilt walkers, dancers, acrobats doing back flips, fire breathers – it’s got it all. The shot of the busker was taken in Co. Cork – many of these performers are very street photo friendly and do not mind you taking their photo once you acknowledge them. No better way than by throwing them a few euro :)

“Rebel without a cause”


Dublin has a bunch of really cool locally owned coffee shops. Unfortunately we are seeing more and more big chain coffee shops pop up about the place but thankfully the locals still support the local businesses. Many of these coffee shops make a cool studio for european style impromptu photoshoots!

Sunset in (not on) the Liffey!


For me, a photo has not completed it’s journey until it has been developed and printed. The printing aspect is a recent discovery and I have very much fallen in love with this aspect of the creative process. I now shoot for the print.

Fine art giclee prints on fiber paper are gorgeous. I spend hours trying to get the balance between the choice of edit, the type of paper, texture, color calibration etc… holding a finished product in my hand is immensely satisfying.

I’m very much a learner with a lot yet to learn but I’d hope to have my first article published and open to constructive criticism and feedback from the community. Thank you for taking the time out of your day to look at my photos and I hope that you enjoyed them.

My flickr is : https://www.flickr.com/photos/24434110@N05/



Sep 152015


Over 100 Leica Weddings

by Philip Thomas

Steve- thanks for the opportunity to share my love of the Leica. I’ve been reading this blog for over five years and it was part of your early reviews that finally moved me to try a Leica M9.

Over a 100 Leica weddings have come and gone since I shot my first wedding with a Leica M9 and a Leica M(240). This post is not for readers interested in a review of Leica gear. Rather, it’s more about how I feel when I use it and how it’s shaped my approach to taking photos. Perhaps even making me a better photographer for it.



The small non-intimidating cameras have allowed me to go about my wedding work as unobtrusively as possible and not be seen as the ‘professional photographer’. You see, I don’t want to draw attention to myself much like a street shooter. Couples booking me know in advance my philosophical approach and the idea of a photographer not directing their day has a strong appeal. It’s not just opened my mind up to a patient way of seeing, capturing moments and geometry, but how I carry myself throughout a wedding.




A photographer for over 20 years, I’ve always had an interest in the Leica history. When I first got my hands on a Leica six years ago, I knew from that moment, somehow I had to get one without breaking the bank. Discussing this with my wife’s approval was part of the deal. My first camera was the M9 with a 35mm f1.4 summilux and from that point on I was hooked. Over a 100 weddings later, the M9 and Leica M240 are an integral part of my wedding day along with a few lenses. A 1957 M3 is also part of my personal gear.




My philosophy shooting weddings is to react and anticipate moments throughout a wedding day. I take a few quick group shots. Other than that, I capture the day unobtrusively avoiding those done and dusted wedding cliches. People just ignore me because the Leica is so small, no one takes any notice and those Uncle Bob’s, the often annoying camera enthusiasts at every wedding just do not approach. Compared to lifting a big SLR to my eye certainly gets people’s attention and unobtrusiveness is certainly not part of the vocabulary. Of course, none of this can really be achieved without the appropriate body language throughout the long day shoot.




My reasons why I use a rangefinder are multiple. Along with the obvious history and inspiration using Leica, my mind has opened up to a world that I didn’t always see before and I strongly believe that as a work in progress my images are stronger. The full manual focus (yes, I can focus more often than not quicker manually than auto focus), the simplicity of shutter and aperture give me complete control over the final images. If I mess up, then I cannot blame the camera. It’s basic aperture and shutter operation. My eye pre-visualizes the type of images I want to create vs the former method of shooting a DSLR and reacting to everything and then the momentary blackness of the shutter closing may mean missing the shot entirely. With the rangefinder, I don’t miss anything, other than the occasional physical finger action not quite paired with my brain.






I rarely look or monkey chimp the reviews after each shot or if I do it’s just to check the histogram. My mind already has the image before pressing the shutter. It’s shooting with purpose versus the temptation to machine gun images that a SLR offers. Sure you can shoot multiple images albeit at a slower burst rate, but that’s not what the Leica have been designed for, It’s more of a cerebral thoughtful approach. This all takes practice in getting efficient. A recent wedding client, a Leica aficionado was kind to marvel how quickly I could focus and shoot their images on par with a SLR, just not wasting files space on a card with multiple shots that look the same.





I have and do often shoot a full days wedding armed with just two Leica’s, a M9 and M240 using just available light. Not only does this approach work wonders for my ageing back but it keeps me nimble on my toes without having to drag a heavy bag around. I’ve always been a huge fan of Henri Cartier-Bresson who not only used a Leica and a 50mm lens but marveled at how in his documentary films that remain how he moved around like a cat on tip toes.






There are many wonderful rangefinder type cameras on the market today compared to just five to ten years ago. At the end of the day, the final image is still the most important, not the camera. But the tools to make that image, surely can inspire and motivate you to take your passion and craft to the top. For me, those sublime Leica lenses and little cameras do the trick. The Leica enables me to just concentrate on the subject and my consciousness is focused on the decisive moment, not what menu option I should have.







Thanks for reading. My site is www.philipthomasstudios.com

Warm regards,
Philip Thomas

W: www.philipthomasstudios.com
Blog: www.philipthomasstudios.com/blog/

Nominated Top 20 Wedding Photographer in Texas

WPJA-Wedding Photojournalist Association® Multi-award Winning Photographer.

© 2009-2015 STEVE HUFF PHOTOS All Rights Reserved

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