Jul 282014
 

Good Things Come in Small Packages: My Sony RX1R Experience

 

by Daniel Stainer – His website is HERE.

Sony-DSC-RX1R-1

From the scorching Nevada desert to the sandy shores of Outer Banks North Carolina, I’ve had six months to put the amazing Sony RX1R through its paces.

For my landscape work, I mainly shoot with the equally capable (but different) Nikon D800e, although I find it a bit bulky for spontaneous street and travel work. I always say that when you’re working the street with a larger-sized DSLR, people either want to mug you or they think you’re a member of the paparazzi. Either way, larger cameras are not as discreet and can often impact the subtle dynamic and interaction between photographer and subject. This is where the smaller Sony RX1R really shines.

Light & Shadow (Old Rhyolite Prison) (1 of 1)

So after six months, you’re probably wondering…what is my overall opinion of the RX1R? In a nutshell, It’s like owning a Leica M with a 35mm F/1.4 Lux lens, but at a fraction of the expense (so long as you’re fine using a slightly slower fixed prime). For those of you with Leica lens lust like myself, this is certainly a viable alternative – and one that won’t elicit buyer’s remorse.

While I won’t go all DxO on you with lens peeping comparisons, I can tell you that the Zeiss optics and image characteristics are simply stunning – as is the camera body fit and finish. Dynamic range and low-light/high-ISO capability is quite frankly excellent – as is color rendering and micro contrast. Much like Leica, the bokeh characteristics have a 3D quality that really pops. I can’t believe Sony was able to fit such a good 24MP FX sensor into such a small body.

Rhyolite Ghost Town (Beatty, Nevada)

Surprisingly (and as many users have already noted), the camera was actually too small for my hands weighted against the built-in Zeiss lens. Paired with a Really Right Stuff L-bracket and grip, it now balances out perfectly without compromising on the small footprint or good looks. I did initially purchase the stylish Gariz leather half-case, although I ended up selling it because I found the RRS bracket set-up to be more practical for my tripod work (boasting better hand-held stability).

Some would call the slower AF system the Achilles Heel – and I would somewhat disagree. While it’s not as blazingly fast as some of the Nikon/Canon DSLRs out there, it is very respectable (especially once you get a feel for things). I tried it out many times in lower light, and it seemed to track well – especially when coupled with Auto ISO to maintain an optimal hand-held shutter speed.

Desert Effigy (Beatty, NV) (1 of 1)

I absolutely love Sony’s Auto ISO capability. Shooting in aperture priority or manual, there’s not much this camera can’t handle – and even the high ISO shots are very clean – just about on par with my former Nikon D4 up to about ISO 6400. Combined with the speed priority continuous burst drive setting, and you’ll have a formidable dual weapon for sharply stopping action dead in its tracks.

Truth be told, the AF is not nearly as lackluster as many have reported. That’s not to say that a faster and more responsive AF wouldn’t be a welcome enhancement for fast action or street-shooting scenarios. But you can manage and mitigate these shortcomings with the right settings and technique.

Old Las Vegas Blvd (1 of 1)

As for other weaknesses, some argue that the lack of built-in OVF/EVF is a deal breaker. I did get Sony’s optional EVF – which is pretty sweet. It does make the camera a bit more bulky, but the fact that you can take it on and off and go stealthy is a nice thing IMHO. Shooting from the hip or via the beautiful-rendering LCD can also have its benefits when you’re trying to blend in. So maybe not ideal for some, it was not a show stopper for me.

Forget-Me-Not (Disabled American Vet) Big Butler Fair, PA (1 of 1)

So what didn’t I like? Well – I’m not crazy about the organization of the menu system (being spoiled by Nikon). Too many non-intuitive tabs. Also, I think the camera has too many features and options (if you’re a JPEG shooter, you’ll love all the cool filters and snazzy pre-sets). But like anything else, you can choose to ignore most of them and focus on basic minimalist RAW settings. And if B&W photography is your thing, the RX1R converted RAW files are breathtaking – with deep dark blacks and plenty of contrast to satisfy even the most discriminating user.
Probably the biggest miss from Sony is the lack of proper weathersealing. As I’m writing this review, my RX1R has been mailed to Sony service to clean up some rather noticeable dust bunnies that made their way deep onto the sensor/inner lens element. I was hoping to avoid these issues with the attached lens construction.

Carny (Big Butler Fair) (1 of 1)

If you shoot wide open at F/2 everyday, all day – you probably won’t notice any dust. But if you stop down for any landscape work (even urban landscapes), they could become glaringly obvious. In all fairness to Sony, taking a non weather sealed camera to the desert or beach was probably ill-advised on my part. Even if you treat the camera with kid gloves, the RX1R was not designed for extreme environments (wind, sand, dust, water). Just don’t tell that to all the pros, semi-pros and advanced amateurs out there who refuse to put their cameras behind a museum display case. When all else fails, you’ve always got the clone/heal tool.

Bingo (Big Butler Fair, PA) (1 of 1)

Kennywood Amusement Park (Pittsburgh, PA) (1 of 1)

Lastly, I wanted to talk about the price. Sure, the camera with accessories can cost a small fortune. And I would agree that some of the accessories (like the obnoxiously-priced lens hood or lack of standalone charger) should be included. But when you consider the amazing optics and capabilities – it’s a veritable bargain. That Leica lens I referenced above cost $5,150 from B&H, without the camera.

On Top of Old Baldie (Big Butler Fair) (1 of 1)

Make no mistake – Sony has created something very special in the RX1R. For those looking to augment their larger DSLR system for more discreet street and travel work, I can’t think of anything better than the Sony RX1R. It’s not perfect – but what camera ever is? But in the area that really matters (image quality and lens rendering characteristics), the Sony RX1R is the king of mirrorless as far as I’m concerned – and a very strong contender to the best that Leica (or any manufacturer, for that matter) can offer.

Abandoned Fun Park Mansion (Salvo, NC)

Best of all, you won’t have to sell off your first-born to own one (ha-ha), although you might have to sell a few knickknacks on eBay to cover the rather pricy accessories. This is one camera I won’t be parting with anytime soon – even given its quirks.

Faded Glory (Salvo, NC)

Daniel Stainer

Jul 272014
 

Black and White Storytelling

by Ben Miller

Steve and Brandon,

I think that all photographers are searching for the perfect camera and a photographic style that they can call their own.

My main focus in photography is black and white storytelling. I find that the sum of several photographs which tells a story can be greater than one just one perfect image. I have found the gear that best suits my focus. In my bag is a Leica M9 and an Olympus OM-D E-M5. Both of these systems allow me to get close to people without being obtrusive. I believe in prime lenses and do not own any zooms.

I recently was commissioned to shoot an event with my M9 and E-M5. During the gathering I was pulled away and asked to join a few gentlemen in the parking lot. I wrote the following story to accompany the captures of what occurred:

 

At every party there is a secret party.

One that only few know about and are invited to.

I was lured away from the crowd to one of these clandestine gatherings.

I turned down the smoke as it is not my thing.

I partook in drink instead.

They handed me a big shot of Fireball whiskey.

I gargled the cinnamon spiced liquor and then swished it around in my mouth.

After swallowing I asked if they had handed me water and if there was anything stronger.

As I raised my Leica to my eye I said “document everything”.

I then smiled and said “don’t worry…..

I’ll only capture you from the nose down.”

 

Attached are the images from the photo story.

You can view more of my work on my website and blog:

www.photographsbyben.com

www.photographsbybenmiller.blogspot.com

Thank you Steve and Brandon for having a wonderful website that so many of us look forward to everyday.

Cheers,

Ben Miller

Secret Party 1

Secret Party 10

Secret Party 9

Secret Party 8

Secret Party 7

Secret Party 6

Secret Party 5

Secret Party 4

Secret Party 3

Secret Party 2

Secret Party 11

Secret Party 12

Secret Party 13

Secret Party 14

Jul 262014
 

Shooting baskets in Amsterdam with Sony and Nikon

By Andrew Paquette

www.paqart.com

About a month ago I received an email from a basketball organization asking if I would be interested in shooting an event for them. This is the first time anyone had offered to hire me as a photographer and the event itself sounded like a lot of fun to shoot, so of course I accepted. The reason they sent the email is because I had shot a preliminary event last year and sent them some of the photos, which they liked. Now I actually had a job as a photographer to do the same thing during my summer holiday from working as a university lecturer. Was I looking forward to this? You bet!

The event was the Streetball Master 2014 semi-finals and finals, held in Amsterdam at the Olympic Stadium. At least, it was on the first day. Due to rain, the second day was held indoors at a large basketball complex. Streetball is a half court three—on—three competition. It is very fast and very close. Last year I got knocked over a couple times by players because I had to sit near the foul lines to get my photos. This year would be different—I thought—because it was at the Olympic stadium. Every stadium I’d ever been to, even basketball courts, have a substantial buffer zone around the play area. This meant to me that I should get a longer lens than I usually used, a Sony/Zeiss ZA 135mm 1.8 to mount on my A7r. I also decided to bring my Nikkor 85mm 1.4G to mount on a D800, and then tossed a Zeiss Otus 55mm in my bag in case I had any decent portrait opportunities. My primary concern was getting the best action shots, which meant fast auto-focus (AF). I shot some of the basketball shots with a 35mm AF lens the previous year, but half of the shots were taken with a 15mm Distagon at extremely close range (almost touching the foul line under the basket). This year I wanted to use AF for pretty much everything and that meant the 135mm and 85mm were going to do all the heavy lifting, then the 55mm Otus might get pulled out at the end for a couple of portraits. Is this what happened? Not even close!

When I got to the Olympic Stadium, I found that the venue was in a plaza outside of the stadium, not inside the stadium. What did this mean? No buffer zone, exactly like the previous year. Because of the way it was set up, I could shoot from within a few inches of the foul line to not more than about two feet from the foul line. Any further away and I’d have to shoot through the crowd of spectators. As it was, I more than once wanted to get in front of the referee, who kept standing right in front of my camera. Trying to get AF to work in such a tight space, with players constantly zipping in front of or behind each other was very difficult. The 135mm got a few nice head and shoulders shots, but the difficulty of using the AF made me holster the camera after about an hour. The 85mm was worse. While the 135mm did occasionally get things in focus the way I wanted, the 85mm almost never did. The couple of times it worked, the subject was standing still for a portrait shot. In those situations it worked perfectly. So the 85mm went back in my bag for the rest of the weekend. For the first day, I used the only other lens I had left, the Otus, and it worked beautifully.

Sometime during the afternoon, another photographer came up to me and we talked a bit about the event. I said I was disappointed with the results I was getting with my long AF lenses, so I was going to switch to MF wide-angle lenses the next day. He looked horrified. “But we only care about the action, and that all happens in the arms. I don’t care about the legs, you can just cut those off and I don’t care”. The 135mm that I had on the camera during the conversation was the right lens for the event, he said. He was using a Canon 70mm-200mm for his shots. I figured he had more experience shooting like that, but I liked to see the legs in a shot also because they can be very dynamic. With some reservations, I decided to follow through with my plan of using wide-angle lenses the next day.

On Sunday, I took my 55mm Otus, a 35mm Summilux ASPH, a 15mm Distagon, and the Nikkor 85mm 1,4G. I used the 85 about three times (and got one good portrait shot out of it). Everything else was shot with the other lenses. The day before, the Otus was the workhorse lens. The same was true of Sunday, though the Summilux handled the low light in the gymnasium better than the Otus. I don’t understand why that happened because they both have the same aperture, but the Summilux shots were all brighter at the same shutter/aperture/ISO than the Otus. This meant I could shoot at lower ISO and a higher shutter speed than the Otus, which was a real advantage. I assumed this was a matter of the difference between the displays of the D800 and the A7r, but during processing, the difference in exposure remained. In the end, almost all of the best shots were taken with MF lenses. The wide angle shots, including the ultra-wide angle 15mm, yielded some interesting pictures, the advice I received to the contrary notwithstanding. Below are some selections from the shoot.

Streetball 2014 Amsterdam Day two (66 of 107)

Streetball 2014 Amsterdam Day two (184 of 29)

Streetball 2014 Amsterdam Day two (190 of 29)

Streetball 2014 Amsterdam Day two (123 of 55)

Streetball 2014 Amsterdam Day two (174 of 29)

Streetball 2014 Amsterdam Day two (13 of 107)

Streetball 2014 Amsterdam Day two (54 of 107)

Streetball 2014 Amsterdam Day two (141 of 55)

Streetball 2014 Amsterdam Day one (90 of 66)

Streetball 2014 Amsterdam Day one (88 of 66)

Streetball 2014 Amsterdam Day one (74 of 66)

Streetball 2014 Amsterdam Day one (294 of 17)

Streetball 2014 Amsterdam Day one (234 of 70)

Streetball 2014 Amsterdam Day one (200 of 70)

Streetball 2014 Amsterdam Day one (189 of 70)

Streetball 2014 Amsterdam Day one (263 of 34)

Jul 252014
 

Olympus XA series user report

By Gary Perlmutter

XA2

I first used the Olympus XA back in the early eighties and recently when looking for a cheap camera to start shooting film again, came across the range once more on eBay. The Olympus XA series first arrived in 1979 with the original XA (and the best specified model). A tiny true rangefinder 35m film camera with a very sharp 35mm f2.8 Zeiss Tessar lens. It had a built-in meter and a matching flashgun that simply screwed onto the side of the camera. Then in 1980 a more affordable addition to the line up was the XA2, this had a pre-focus slider, auto exposure and a cheaper but still very sharp f3.5 Zeiss Tessar lens. Other models released were the very basic XA1, the XA3 (which was really the same as the XA2 but with DX coding so that the film speed was set automatically) and finally the XA4, which had a 28mm macro lens that could focus down to one foot. The example I purchased was the XA2 model for just 7.50GBP or about $13. The original XA’s command a higher price, but can still be found for around 50GBP or $85. Most are still sold complete with the flashgun, which as mentioned earlier simply screws onto the side of the camera body.
When you buy any film camera of this sort of age it’s important that the seals around the camera back are intact. Otherwise you could get light leaking in and fogging the film. They can be replaced but on a camera already so cheap, it’s better to move on and find an example with the seals intact. Other things to look out for are is that the lens is free from fungus or scratches and that the shutter and meter work ok. They operate with two SR44 or equivalent batteries. Using the XA2 is a joy, especially for my passion of street photography. It’s tiny and black with a very quiet shutter, so very inconspicuous. Just slide open the clamshell cover and your ready to go, on the assumption you’ve remembered to load it with film first that is! Loaded with 400 ISO film and having set the focus slider to the middle setting, (Actually it resets to this anyway on closing the cover) most subjects will be sharp from around a metre or so to about 5 metres. So perfect again for shooting in the street. So if you’re looking for a full frame rangefinder camera for less than $85, you need not look much further! I have attached a few images shot with the first roll of Ilford HP5 plus that I put through the camera. I then processed the film myself with Ilford developer and scanned using my Plustek 8100, then tweaked just a little in Lightroom.
Full spec below:
Olympus XA

Lens: 35mm f/2.8 internally focused lens. Does not retract: magic optical design makes it shorter than its own focal length! It’s ready to shoot the instant you slid it open.
Exposure: Aperture preferred automation.
ISO: 25 to 800.
Shutter: Automatic electronic analog, 1/500 – 10 seconds.
Aperture: two-bladed manual, f/2.8 – f/22.
Focus: Rangefinder.
Power: Two SR44 cells.
Colors: Black; also red, silver or blue.
Weight: 7.800 oz (221.15g) with batteries (measured).
Size: 2.567″ x 4.123″ x 1.572″ HWD (measured).

Olympus XA2
Lens: 35mm f/3.5, four element Tessar variant, front element focus.
Focus: three zone manual. Resets to mid-distance when clamshell is closed.
Metering: Center weighted, program auto.
ISO: 25 to 800.
Shutter: 1/500 – 2 seconds. Aperture integrated with the two shutter blades.
Power: 2 SR44 cells.
Size: 2.598″ x 4.102″ x 1.605″ HWD (measured).
Weight: 7.480 oz., (212.1g) with two S76 cells (measured).
Olympus XA4 (1985)
The XA4 was an XA2 with a 28mm lens that scale-focuses as close as 1 foot (0.3m). The wrist strap was this same length so you could tape-off your shots.
Closing the cover also reset the scale focus back to 10 feet (3m).
My links: http://gpstreetphotos.tumblr.com
Twitter: @gpstreetphotos

 chilling

cool

I believe

Jul 242014
 

Il Cuore Siciliano

By Colin Steel – His website is here

(From Steve: Here we are again with another superb set of photographs from Colin Steel, one of my favorite photographers ever. His work is always quite special and I am happy that he chooses to share much of it here. Thanks Colin!)

I recently returned from my second visit to the amazing Easter celebrations in Sicily and I wanted to share some thoughts that have been forming in my head around photographing and making sense of the rituals and place itself. Firstly, Sicily is a very unique island and its cultural development is complex having been subject to a number of different and varied influences over the centuries. For this reason I think it’s extremely challenging for an outsider like me to get to grips with and to really understand the depth of what is going on. As a result of this most photographers, particularly first timers, get caught up in the cliches and more obvious shots that are more superficial in nature. I have done this myself, not only in Sicily but I well remember my first trips to places like Bali and Bagan in Myanmar where I thought I was taking the most incredible and vibrant images only to discover on reflection that, although well composed etc. they were very obvious and had been done many times before , and indeed, had been done much better by more accomplished photographers who knew the locations better. The reason I am saying this is that I now believe that you have to keep visiting places and themes that interest you again and again to get really deep into yourself and your emotional reaction to what you see and feel. Only then can you begin to sensibly translate your view and vision.

As I said, this is only my second visit so I consider myself to be at the very beginning of a long and hopefully fruitful relationship with Sicily and its people. I had a very difficult time this year with editing and sequencing my work as I believe my thinking and photography has changed and matured a great deal in the space of a year since my last visit but I have combined last year and this years work and with my friend Jay Komuda come up with a pretty tight edit that is I believe moving in the right direction.

107141-8425700-Colin_Steel_01

107141-8425702-Colin_Steel_02

107141-8425703-Colin_Steel_03

107141-8425706-Colin_Steel_04

107141-8425708-Colin_Steel_05

107141-8425711-Colin_Steel_06

107141-8425712-Colin_Steel_07

107141-8425714-Colin_Steel_08

107141-8425716-Colin_Steel_09

107141-8425718-Colin_Steel_10

107141-8425721-Colin_Steel_11

107141-8425722-Colin_Steel_12

107141-8425723-Colin_Steel_13

107141-8425724-Colin_Steel_14

107141-8425727-Colin_Steel_15

107141-8425730-Colin_Steel_16

107141-8425732-Colin_Steel_17

107141-8425733-Colin_Steel_18

Jul 232014
 

Japan with the OM-D M5 and FT-lenses

By Ingo Socha

Dear Brandon and Steve,

a carpenter in a small workshop in Kyoto, an ebullient shipyard worker, who took me for a ride, the smell of incense at Kompirasan – the reward for traveling, traveling not with the latest equipment, but with gear that allows room in the budget for the trip. A while ago your reader Etienne Schoettel wrote about „The best camera ever“ and argued that it was worthwhile to put money in travels rather than in gear — I could not agree more. As for me, I always wanted to go Japan and experience the country, Tokyo‘s buzz, Kyoto‘s temples and – the country side.

So this year I went on my dream trip: 11 days and 2.500,00 Euro is what I could shell out from the family budget and other responsibilities. Since I did not want to carry my trusty, but heavy Olympus E-3 along, I went out and bought an OM-D M5. After some consideration I decided on the Viltrox-Adapter to go with it, rather than the Olympus original (www.viltrox.com). During the entire trip I have not had any problems with the non-brand adapter. Of course the AF is not as snappy as with the original lenses, but it still works fine, at least with the lenses I used (all Four Thirds lenses rather than Micro Four Thirds):

* Olympus 14-54mm, 1:2.8-3.6
* Olympus 40-150mm, 1:3.5,-4.5 (don‘t smirk, this lens is very usable)
* Sigma 30mm, 1:1.4 (my favourite)

The Sigma I like to focus manually anyway.

I shoot RAW and process all pictures with Capture One. For black and white conversions I use DxO-Filmpack 4 mostly with Agfa APX 25 or Ilford Pan F 50 emulations. The APX is what I liked to use when I was shooting film.

Why aren‘t there any cars driving by Tokyo station? I don‘t know. While I was standing on the roof of the Kitte-Mall, I suddenly realized this was the moment — when the light turned green, traffic quickly spilled back into the place. The second b/w picture is the carpenter I already mentioned (I could not figure out what he was working on and my Japanese was just enough to ask if it was ok to take a picture). The only light source was a tiny desk lamp — with f/2.8 and 1/60 still decent results, I think. DxO throws in a little grain which camouflages sensor noise nicely.

And the girls? They dressed up to lure tourists into taking pictures and talking to them — which in my case worked fine.

www.flickr.com/photos/ingosocha

Ingo Socha, Lübeck

ingosocha.de

flickr.com/ingosocha

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Jul 222014
 

My $3 wonder, the classic Ricoh FF-90 Review

By Brandon Huff

DSC_4551

Hey everyone, hope you are all having a great day today! I recently acquired a new to me Ricoh FF-90 film camera. Gotta love the local Goodwill! After buying it I wanted to put it to use so away I went.

I took the Ricoh FF-90 to the river hoping to get some great shots of people and the group I was with, I got a few but noticed some small issues with this camera. This could easily be that it was a Goodwill camera and had some issues from the owner misusing it or just due to age, who knows. However when this camera does focus right and focus well, the camera has pretty well photo quality even though I am using not very good film for this test (just some cheap CVS Kodak film) I may put some Porta 160 in this camera to see how much better it is then update this review with better photos. To me, the lens looks good so far.

My favorite part of this camera over the Contax T2 that I have been using is it is way quicker, though more cheaply made it still feels great in the hand, when I took this on the river I had to keep it in a small waterproof box attached to my belt loop which wasn’t the most comfortable thing ever but good enough to be able to get some good photos. I could easily and quickly grab it out and take a picture then hurry and put it in before the rapids came. When you place film inside this little camera it automatically winds it and tells you the ISO by itself. It’s practically a fully automatic analog camera which is nice for a point in shoot sometimes. So yea, this is indeed a Point and Shoot. Nothing fancy, nothing exotic..just a good old-fashioned P&S film camera.

Kyle, mid day AZ sunshine on the river – Ricoh FF-90

Kyle tube

The colors are actually quite nice even with very cheap film about 8 dollars for 3 rolls, if I was to put Porta 160 in here and the camera focused correctly I bet it would be quite superb..I love Portra!

Sarah Ricoh FF-90

Sarah

Group Photo Ricoh FF-90 – others that were on the river that day..

Group photo

Group of tubes Ricoh FF-90

Group

Party

Focus issue 2

Landscape

Focus prob

This camera has made many of my photos unusable as it did not focus correctly on many occasions.  It either focused really close or behind the subject which is quite…. odd, but when it works well the images do come out nice and I enjoy the images this camera gives! I must say for 3 dollars from Goodwill this camera is terrific even if it is a little sketchy but hey,  you can’t beat that price! I will be keeping this camera as a backup or carry while hiking kind of camera! Id say if you can find one for under 8 dollars go for it! It’s a great cheap alternatives to the higher rated point and shoots and isn’t that bad of quality!

Thank you everyone for reading!

Brandon

http://brandonhuffphotography.com

Jul 212014
 

USER REPORT: The Olympus 35mm f3.5 Macro and Samyang 85 f1.4 on the Panasonic G6

By Francis Thompson

Hi Steve, I’d like to share my experiences of shooting with my Panasonic G6 and a couple of interesting lenses.
First, a (very) brief introduction; I’m a design student from England with an interest in photography, and I’m currently in Ireland on a work placement (designing UAVs to carry the likes of RED cameras!) Along with my G6 and 20mm f1.7 II, my camera bag usually includes two rather less conventional, non-native lenses – first, the Olympus 35mm f3.5 macro, and secondly the Samyang 85mm f1.4. The Olympus 35mm f3.5 macro is a Four Thirds lens; as the previous owner of an E-420, this is the one lens I hung onto. With the Panasonic 4/3-MFT adaptor, it’s very well-balanced on the G6, and autofocus actually works better than it did on the E-420. That’s not saying a whole lot though; AF is incredibly slow, hunting in all light and missing AF pretty regularly. However, there’s a whole raft of better choices in native MFT at similar focal lengths. Where this lens shines is up close and personal. With a maximum magnification of 1:1 (2:1 35mm equivalent) this lens lets you get very close. At 35mm, it’s possibly not the best for some more shy subjects such as butterflies, but for more static subjects it’s a great choice. MF is very usable, especially using focus aids or peaking in MFT bodies.

Whilst it lacks some macro specific features like focus limiting, it’s worth considering that at the time of writing, a new 35mm macro plus 4/3 to MFT adaptor would still set you back considerably less than either the Panasonic or Olympus MFT native macro lenses.
The Samyang 85mm f1.4 is a brute of a lens. Big, heavy, tough to focus…yet somehow, I find myself inexplicably drawn to it time after time. Shooting handheld with the G6 can be a pain, as supporting the weight of it often leads to accidental button presses. Whilst the lens balances somewhat poorly on the G6, I imagine many of the smaller bodies would be even more difficult to use with it; GH3/4 and EM1 users might have more luck. Other associated issues with it are very shallow DOF wide open, making focussing difficult, and the fact it doesn’t have a hard infinity stop (mine focusses a fraction past infinity). The relatively long focal length also limits low light handheld performance (the unbalanced nature of the body/lens combo leads to realistic usable shutter speed limit of 1/250s.)

The problems don’t stop there; the lens is soft wide open, the included lens hood and cap aren’t great, and the 72mm filters it takes tend to be a fair bit pricier than the usual 52 or 58mm found on many MFT lenses. But somehow, despite all the problems, despite the tens of just-missed-focus images in my folders, the big 85 is the lens I leave on my camera most of the time. It’s a lens that makes you work for good shots, but I for one enjoy the challenge and the results it presents when you get it just right.
All images shot in RAW, minimal processing in ACR.

Samyang 85mm  (4)

Samyang 85mm  (5)

Samyang 85mm  (6)

Samyang 85mm  (7)

Olympus 35mm (6)

Olympus 35mm (7)

Samyang 85mm  (1)

Samyang 85mm  (2)

Samyang 85mm  (3)

Olympus 35mm (1)

Olympus 35mm (2)

Olympus 35mm (3)

Olympus 35mm (4)

Olympus 35mm (5)

Jul 212014
 

The Sony NEX-5R with Russian lenses

By Freddy Robles

Hi Steve, Greetings from Mexico, well first of all I want to say I’m a fan of yours for a long time and congratulate you for this site because is truly inspirational.

I write you from the little magic town of Cuetzalan. Cuetzalan is a small town set high in the hills in the north of the Mexican state of Puebla , 183 kilometers from Puebla , the state capital. I lived in NY for a while and it was there where I grew the interest in the photography, street photography and mobile photography (iPhoneography) started with the mirrorless cameras and now that I have returned to my country again I have had the fortune to travel widely in different communities and learn more about our mexican culture.

Cuetzalan offers a spectacular mosaic integrating the exuberant subtropical vegetable proposal with its falls and its water sources; it also offers its surprising geologic structure, its remote past and its traditions which are recalled in clothes, in celebrations and rites surprising. This tiny town surrounded by a tropical forest filled with waterfalls, grottos, archaeological site, colonial buildings as churches and coffee plantations also has like characteristic the existence of an endless number of underground caverns. Although the majority of them are not accessible to the public, these caves have stirred up the interest of national and foreign investigators.

The climate of the town is semi-warm humid with rain throughout the year, favoring flora and cloud forest tree species with sweetgum and ornamental flowers such as orchids, Calla Lilies, azaleas, hydrangeas and ferns.

Most of its population is from the Nahuatl culture that still preserve their customs and traditions. So I started wearing the nex5R, everywhere, my main lens is the Jupiter-8 50mm f2 and Industar-69 28mm though the Sel35mm f1.8 fascinates me, the tones in B / W that produce these Russian lenses are phenomenal. Thanks to this blog, Steve, I used more the VSCO filters, IMO, are very essential, useful and give a radical change to your photos, and I’ve even made ​​several shots with the iPhone and using these filters in VSCOcam, are incredible .
Ahead are some pics of “The Magic Town Cuetzalan”

1.-image of the ”litte boy” nex7- canon 135mm f/3.5 ISO200 1/100s

DSC09920

-

2.-image of the ”collecting coffee bean” nex5R -Sel50 mm f1.8 f2.2 ISO 400 1/100s

DSC07185-Editar

-

3.-image of the ”the boy behind the school gate” nex5R -SEL18-55mm 40 mm f 4.5 ISO 100 1/60s

DSC06119

-

4.-image of ”the 4 boys” nex5R -SEL18-55mm f6.3 ISO 200 1/100s

DSC02208

-

5.-image ”la abuela” nex5R- SEL18-55 mm 55 mm f5.6 ISO200 1/160

DSC02172

-

6.-image ”thinking” nex5R -SEL18-55mm 52mm f/5 ISO 200 1/160S

DSC02165

-

7.- image of “Alone ” nex5R-Leica APO 135mm f3.4 f/3.4 ISO100 1/250s

DSC00054

-

8.- image of “two guys ” nex5R-Industar-69 28mm f2.8 ISO100 1/400S

DSC00281

-

9.-image of “strong look ” nex5R- Leica APO 135mm f3.4 ISO 200 1/100s

DSC00050

-

10.image of ”nahua women” nex5R-Leica APO 135mm f5.6 ISO100 1/200s

DSC00156

-

11.- image of ”Little Lupita” nex5R -SEL18-55mm f/8 ISO200 1/160S

DSC02078

-

12.- image of ” green and cloudy”, nex7 – SEL55-210mm 62 mm f8 ISO400 1/160

DSC09370

-

13.-image of ” Las amacas” nex7-SEL16mm f2.8 f22 ISO400 1/10s

DSC07619

-

14.-image of ”Yohualichan” nex7-SEL35mm f1.8 f/13 ISO100 1/15s

DSC07659

-

15.- image of ” Cuetzalan” nex7-SEL50mm f/1.8 f/9 ISO100 1/200s

DSC09139

-

16.-image of ”Voladores de Cuetzalan” nex7 -Voigtlander Color Skopar 28mm f/2.8 f/5.6 ISO 200 1/400s

DSC07565-Editar

Jul 192014
 

Hello Steve,

My name is Hiroyasu Hosoya and I am Japanese amateur street photographer. I am living in Barcelona since 27 years ago. (I am 32yo).

I started shooting, 7 years ago, Landscape pictures because of influence of my girlfriend who loves hiking, but as I am a big fun of “critical situation” and “close photography” I turned to the Street Photography. During a couple of years I was shooting with Leica camera but 6 month ago, I had an incident, all my Leica gear has been stolen in the City on daylight… so now a days I am shooting with Fuji x100 black edition that gives me a RF feeling. I am starting to make my web sites and also large printing for the near-future exhibition here in Barcelona. I think all pictures must printed and “BIG”!!
You can see in my Flick Site (www.flickr.com/photos/hiroyasuhosoya) almost the major part of pictures were taken in Asia (Japan, Thailand, Hong Kong stc..) during my trips.

http://www.alstom.com/power

Here my favourite pictures.

image007

image008

image009

Jul 192014
 

40mm, the blind frame

by Daniel Schaefer

40mm, the blind frame.
As any photographer building out a kit knows, the stresses of balancing both budget, and usability when purchasing lenses is always a daunting challenge. When I was an SLR shooter, I always tended towards two fields of view, primarily 35mm for my everyday carry, and 50mm for portrait work. I was however always frustrated by the limits of the two and found myself stuck switching more often than I would like.

I was never entirely able to settle the frame in a way that I liked, 35mm was near perfect horizontally, but for a vertical portrait I found it unflattering, the 50mm had the opposite issue, near flawless for the vertical frame, but far too tight for any horizontal image, far too isolating to show scene the way I wished I could.

I was one day lucky enough to be handed a friends beautiful silver M6, with the task of putting the long retired workhorse back to good use. The task then came down to finding a lens to put the camera to use with. I’ve spent the past few years doing freelance Vintage equipment maintenance, resale and repair, during that time a lens that came across my desk time and time again, yet never managed to catch my attention was the oft forgotten Leica/Minolta Rokkor 40mm f/2

The particular lens is an interesting amalgamation of German and Japanese construction, German optics, shipped in brass tubes to Japan to be assembled under the Minolta monicker. The one hazard, was the lack of 40mm frame lines on the M6, I had the 50mm, I had the 35mm, but for my new weapon of choice I needed to figure out a way to compose…

So, blind to the edges of my frame, I began shooting, both from my eye as per usual, but with my new-found freedom that ignorance of the frame gave me, I began for the first time, shooting almost exclusively from the hip. I began to learn the frame, roll after roll I began to learn the space that the lens occupied, near perfect both horizontally and vertically, the lens sang just as sweetly for street, or portraits.

I’ve been shooting almost exclusively with the 40mm for the past six months, both on the M6, and now an M9. I always approach equipment choice by wondering what story it might let me tell, and so far, I’m enjoying the one the 40mm is writing.

—–


Photographer and Cinematographer

New York / Los Angeles / Firenze

- Outlierimagery.com -

 

Schaefer_40mm_1

Schaefer_40mm_2

Schaefer_40mm_4

Schaefer_40mm_5

Schaefer_40mm_6

Schaefer_40mm_7

Schaefer_40mm_8

Schaefer_40mm_9

Schaefer_40mm_10

Schaefer_40mm_11

Schaefer_40mm_13

Schaefer_40mm_14

Jul 182014
 

Film shoot: Sirens

By Brett Price

Hey Steve,

I’d like to share a few images from a recent shoot I was able to do recently. In the past when I’ve submitted stuff for your site I’ve done extensive write ups on gear or technique but I thought I would just keep this one kinda simple. The theme for this shoot was based off of one of my favorite scenes in one of my favorite movies, “O’Brother Where Art Thou?” The scene with the Sirens is beautiful and I tried to recreate that a little with these photos.

My setup this time was simple. I brought my Leica MP and a Fuji GX645af and shot mainly film for these that you are about to see. It’s a mix of Efke KB50 film (sadly now discontinued) and Kodak Portra 400. I developed the B&W in Rodinal and shot with a Y2 filter. All were scanned with a Noritsu scanner.

I post a lot of my work to:

Tumblr: Brettprice.tumblr.com
Instagram: @brettprice
Flickr: www.flickr.com/photos/brettprice

Hope you like them! Cheers!

000010000001-Edit

000010000010-Edit

000010000013-Edit

000010000018-Edit

000010000021-Edit

000010000026-Edit

000010020027

000010030006

000010030019

000010030030

000010040003

000010050005

000010050014

000010050023

000010050030

Jul 172014
 

Photographing 100 Strangers with Fuji

By Justin Holder

Steve,

Earlier in the year, I started what seemed like a mountain of a project, planning to meet 100 strangers over the next years, interviewing them and compiling them into a book for my two sons. The project is called “Advice For My Boys” and has ended up being not overwhelming, but an incredible journey.

Just last Friday, a couple of days before Father’s Day, I had already hit my 100th stranger since mid February.

I have a Canon 5DMKII and a host of L-lenses, but I knew that would add an intimidation factor, beyond what there would already be. So, I shot the entire project with my Fuji X100s, Fuji X-E1 and then the Fuji X-T1. As many of the other Fuji fans know, these cameras offer such incredible results, yet seem so cosmetically casual and unassuming. I could not be more pleased with the results.

Now, over 100 deep in the project, I have decided to keep going. I always ask my strangers initially three questions: happiest time of your life, toughest time of your life, one piece of advice for my boys. Amazingly, not ONE person has said no to the project.

Even more cool has been the ripple effect of it. One of my favorites, Lois, who worked at McDonald’s said, as we were sitting down to talk, “you know, this is the first time in my life I’ve ever been noticed.” I asked what she meant. “Oh, I’m just one of those people who goes through life and you don’t really notice if I’m there or not.” The next day, lots of readers of the project showed up at her McDonald’s with cards, notes, little gifts, etc. Even the president of the bank went over to see her. She emailed me that evening and said it was the best day of her life. There have been so many similar stories in this project…and I feel certain there’s not one stranger I’ve met by chance.

We’re all fans of Steve’s site because we love cameras and photography, but even more the opportunities and experiences they often allow. If you’ve been considering doing something out of the box, I’d urge you to make the leap. Yes, it’s intimidating, but the rewards greatly outweigh the risk. Cheers to all of you!

Website for the project: www.AdviceForMyBoys.com

Nashville NBC affiliate news story

Thanks, Steve!

Justin

VC-5

VC-2

VC-7

Jul 162014
 

Epson Perfection V600 scanner

by Brandon Huff

(From Steve: Hey guys! Today I bring you an article by my Son, Brandon who has just started to get into film photography, and he is hooked for sure. He has been saving for a Leica M6 but he asked if he could post this short review of his new film scanner here and of course I said yes! He also started his own little website just for fun where he will talk about film gear, scanning, shooting and all kinds of stuff from time to time, so check it out at http://www.brandonhuffphotography.com. He works for me a few hours per week and liked it so much he wanted to start up his own little space on the web. As I always say, it’s all about the passion..and he has it! Like Father like Son!)

For over a month now I have been wondering…should I get a scanner? Should I spend all of that money and potentially not enjoy this time intensive process at all? Well, I will just tell you the old way I was doing it first. After my first roll of film I realized it would be REALLY expensive to get it all scanned at the pro lab at 10-15 dollars a roll. I decided to look for cheap ways to scan film while keeping good quality for what I was doing. I took my Nikon V1 with 18mm lens and propped it on a tripod. I then took a glass door from a cabinet and a bright LED light under with photo paper on top. I would take a picture of each frame and crop it out, this was working great for black and white and medium format but once I got around to color film and especially 35mm format it all went down hill. The contrast was horrible, the colors I tried to fix myself were horrible and it was all just not going to work. So I finally splurged and paid the $220 on Amazon for the Epson V600 scanner.

I must say WOW! This is without a doubt the best 200 dollars I have spent for film photography since I’ve started.  The V700 does medium format and 35mm plus regular scanning as well. It’s resolution for film scans can be set all the way to 12000 DPI even though I can not use that resolution as the scans come out in TIF format at a whopping 1Gig each!! Yes 1GIG! Insane!

Here is the Epson closed

DSC_4546

Here is the Epson open with transparency unit exposed

DSC_4541

Excuse my product shots I have no good way at the moment to do things like this.  The resolution of this scanner is fantastic, it is considered a semi pro model under the Epson V700 which is the professional line but the main reason for not purchasing this is the price jumps and I mean JUMPS this model is only 200-220 dollars while the V700 sky rockets to around 600-700 depending on who you buy it from. Enough talk, lets get to the sample images. I will be showing the old way in which I was doing it (Using my Nikon V1) and the new way as well (with the V600)…

Contax T2 old way with the Nikon V1

mom

Contax T2 same photo Epson V600 4800 DPI

Film auto008

-

Contax T2 old way with the V1

Brother

Contax T2 Epson V600 4800 DPI

Film auto009

I will now show you some holga shots that are color as well…when I did these color photos they were done in full auto mode with NO retouching WHAT SO EVER non at all!

Holga old way with V1

Asian man

-

Holga Epson V600 4800 DPI

Film auto020

-

Holga old way with V1

10448449_805616526136136_674731575960830179_o

-

Holga Epson V600 4800 DPI

Film auto021

The rest of these photos will be from the Mamiya 645. I do not have any color film with it yet but the sharpness if fantastic. Before I do that I would like to say one thing that is wrong with this scanner. The two photos above with the shirts… if you notice the first one is a bigger frame, you can see more shirt to the right and while the one scanned with Epson is WAY better looking it cut off some of the image because it did not see the shirt on the right side. The V600 cropped the frame a bit.

Mamiya 645 Old way with the V1 as the “Scanner”

DSC_4297

DSC_4296

-

Same images but with the Epson v600 9600 DPI

Film auto035

Film auto034

As you can see these photos are FANTASTIC! WAY better quality out of this scanner so all in all I will be keeping it. I love it!  it’s amazing and I think for all you film shooters that do not have the money to blow $600 on the V700, this is one of the best alternatives I know of. Here are some new photos for you all to enjoy from this great scanner!

Mamiya 645

Selife

Moped man

Momma

Grafwall

Also if you want too you are all welcome to check out my new photography blog/review site. I mostly do film cameras and film types, I am in the process of getting more equipment to review so I will try to post as much as possible!

http://brandonhuffphotography.com

Jul 152014
 

titlea7sashwin

The Sony A7s: A New Camera for Leica M lenses

By Ashwin Rao – HIs flickr is HERE, his Facebook is HERE

Hello, gang. It’s Ashwin, back from a bit of a hiatus to discuss the camera du jour, Sony’s impressive A7s. The A7s has gotten quite a bit of press, in particular for it’s remarkable ISO sensitivity/performance, for it’s 4K video, and for it’s buck-the-convention 12-megapixel sensor. It’s been hotly debate, in light of the already-exceptional performance of its two siblings, the A7 and A7R, which offer different full frame sensors. I have extensively shot both bodies, and while I enjoyed the experience, I was left a bit in the lurch for entirely selfish reasons. Unfortunately, extensive shooting bore out that the A7r is really not a great option for Leica M lenses due to the critical nature of the sensor and how it plays (poorly) with M lenses, causing excessive vignetting, color casts, and detail smearing at the edges. The Sony A7 is better with regards to its capacity with M lenses (most lenses 35 mm and above do “okay” to “great” on the A7), but after shooting these 2 cameras, I came to the conclusion that perhaps Leica M lenses were best suited to be used on Leica M camera bodies, from a purely imaging standpoint. One can argue endlessly about the rangefinder (beyond the frame lines) vs SLR/mirrorless (tunnel vision) way of seeing, and there’s really no right answer there, as it’s more a matter of preference. But until recently, while the A7R and A7 were capable of using M lenses, they didn’t really make M lenses shine. And thus, I moved on, continuing to genuinely enjoy my Leica M bodies for my M lenses.

ash17s1

asha7s2

asha7s3

A few months ago, whispers of a new camera began, and what resulted was the Sony A7s….a low megapixel (in today’s market), high ISO monster reportedly designed for videographers ready to make use of its full frame sensor and 4K recording potential. What people did not speak so much about was whether it would handle Leica M lenses better than its siblings. Maybe it was a lack of interest, and maybe the conversation moved on, but for me, my curiosity was piqued. I wondered whether the sensor’s lower megapixel (less critical) sensor, coupled with its gapless sensor design, would allow it to handle rangefinder lenses, which notoriously bend light into difficult angles at the periphery of digital sensors. My curiosity was also piqued by the high ISO capabilities of such a camera. If the A7s could handle high ISO’s as well as was being made out, suddenly, one could use compact, relatively “slow” M lenses such as the f/2 Summicrons, f/2.5 Summarits, f/2.8 Elmarits, and f/4 Elmars in low light conditions at high shutter speeds. Further, faster M lenses, such as the f/1.4 Summiluxes and f/0.95-1 Noctilux options might allow the photographer to see into the dim light of night like never before, and the lenses remain relatively compact to top it off. Leica M and other rangefinder lenses are generally much smaller than their mirrorless (at least FF mirrorless) and SLR counterparts, and balance quite well on the A7(s/r) bodies quite well, so one could make incredibly versatile images at very low light, using a very small kit…..in theory.

asha7s4

asha7s5

To top it off, the Sony A7s was soon announced to have a “silent shutter” option, allowing the photographer to shoot with a full electronic shutter that would not announce itself whenever a photo was being taken. To me, this was one of the huge potential benefits to the Sony…Silence means that a photographer can work discretely, and the A7s, for the first time, offered this option to the photographer choosing a mirrorless body for work…For a Leica photographer-nutball such as myself, the value of discretion is part of the “rangefinder way”, and now, here was a mirrorless body that did it even better than the Leica M3 through M7, with their lovely/subtle shutter sounds….Here was a camera that could offer silence when shooting (albeit with the risk of a rolling shutter effect for fast-moving subjects)….wow, the A7s was now really grabbing my attention.

asha7s6

asha7s7

But, All of this was fine and dandy, but only, and only if M lenses would play well on the Sony….

So the early reports came in, including Steve’s own detailed, fantastic, glowing review of the camera, using mainly FE lenses…Steve was blown away by the camera’s AF performance, high ISO performance, and it’s overall handling, for a full frame camera. But the images that intrigued me most from his review, as well as those of others, was the performance of the tiny Cosina Voigtlander 15 mm Heliar lens. Many of you know that while this lens one of the widest fields of view for a rangefinder lens, it plays quite poorly with the M9 and M240, and doesn’t do well on cropped sensors in many instances, due to excessive color shifts (magenta) and vignetting, due to the physics of the optics at play and how they project light through the lens and onto most sensors…Yet, the Sony A7s was handling the CV 15 mm lens, no sweat.

asha7s8

asha7s9

So off I went to my camera store, armed with a host of Leica M lenses, ranging from a 21 mm f/3.4 Super Elmar through a 90 mm f/2 APO-Summicron. After a few preliminary shots, I took note of dramatically less vignetting and what appeared to be more uniform color through the image field (i.e. no color casts). Hmmmm, great start, I thought….

asha7s10

asha7s11

But what about smearing? One issue with using lenses 35 mm or wider at full aperture, is that many lenses start to smear details at the periphery of the imaging field. It’s a dirty little secret that Leica’s own wide angle lenses tend to do this on digital bodies, and this was one of the reasons that it took so long for Leica to introduce a digital rangefinder (and ultimately, the Leica M8 with it’s 1.3x crop sensor, designed to avoid the physics causing some of the issues mentioned). At one point, Leica’s CEO at the time mentioned that it might never be possible to produce a digital M body, but we know how that prediction turned out….

asha7s12

asha7s13

Smearing has been a major issue for me with full frame bodies such as the Sony A7r and A7, and when added to intermittent color casts and high levels of vignetting, I had previously found that files just took too much work to get things right, and I gave up. Now, sitting home at my computer with a variety of files from a variety of lenses ranging from wide to telephoto, I was not seeing any objectionable colorcasts and much improved vignetting. How about smearing, then? Well, the jury is still out, but for the most part I have been entirely pleased. Of the wide lenses in my possession, I found that the 21 mm f/3.4 Super Elmar did exhibit slight detail loss at the far edges of the image, but this was not objectionable, just more than what I had seen on the M9 and M240 bodies. The lens that continues to “misbehave” on the A7s was the Leica 28 mm f/2 Summicron ASPH. This lens gives even Leica M bodies some trouble, and in the case of the Sony A7s, it has continued to produce moderate smearing at the edges. For real world street photography, in which edge sharpness may not be important, the smearing rarely matters, but if one were shooting landscapes, he or she would notice this, so it’s I lens I have considered avoiding for those moments when edge sharpness matters (For most other moments, the 28 ‘cron works great). Beyond that, I have had no issues with edge smearing. Everything works great. My Wide Angle Tri Elmar (WATE) works perfectly at 16 mm on the A7s, though this lens’ design plays reasonably well with even the A7r. My 35 mm f/1.4 Summilux FLE, which didn’t work well on the A7 due to odd vignetting, works perfectly well on the Sony A7s.

asha7s14

To add to the story, I have found that the Sony A7s does a great job with colors. It presents a palette similar to that of the Sony A7 and A7r, so if you are used to the files that those cameras make, the A7s will be similar. One nice added perk is that at higher ISO, while dynamic range does start to drop off a bit (particularly past ISO 4000, though files are totally useable, in my opinion, through ISO 12,800), the color reproduction at those high ISO’s remains solid. There’s only so much you can push today’s sensor tech, in terms of dynamic range and high ISO noise and color performance, but the Sony A7s is today’s state of the art.

Ultimately, I have been thoroughly pleased with my time using Leica M lenses as my sole lens set up for the Sony A7s. Everything works well. High ISO – check! Silent shutter – check! Minimal muss and fuss with edge image quality – BIG check! Colors and skin tones. Check that as well. Handling of camera with M lenses…big HUGE check! It all seems to work well.

asha7s15

asha7s16

In summary, I have found the Sony A7s to be a great option on which to use Leica M lenses. If you have an investment in rangefinder lenses, or intend to do so, the Sony A7s is the current camera that you’d want to have on a budget. Sure the Leica M9 is fantastic, but it has high ISO limitations. The Leica M240 is great, but tends to start banding around ISO 3200. Those are fantastic options and allow one to see in the “rangefinder way”. But separating yourself from that, the Sony A7s is an incredible imaging machine. Sure, it has a lower megapixel count, but 12 MP files are plenty for the vast majority of us. The camera’s incredible ISO performance allows for the use of slower lenses, and thus more compact lenses, in low light shooting circumstances. Suddenly, your Elmars and Summicrons become relevant options for night photography, and lenses such as the Noctilux allow you to pear into the night better than your own eyes….it’s rather incredible. Creative possibilities open up, and I see new photographic horizons ahead! The Camera’s EVF is sufficient to reliably focus lenses, particularly if one uses the “Focus Magnify” option to achieve critical focus. The silent shutter allows for very discrete shooting, and for most street photography moments, it’s a perfect option (I have yet to see the Rolling shutter effect for my style of shooting) that’s silent and discrete. And year, silent shutter means no shutter shake to blur your images at that pixel level. Speaking of pixels, the camera’s lower pixel count allows for easier achievement of sharp images at slower shutter speeds, if desired, as 12 MP is much easier to hand hold than 36 megapixels in nearly any circumstance…something to consider if pixel peeping for sharp images is your thing.

The list goes on and on, but you can see that I am quite convinced that the Sony A7s is a viable option for those of you who want to use small, high performance rangefinder lenses on a mirrorless body. It’s the way to go. By the way, every image you see here was shot with the A7s and a M mount Leica lens. Now go out, test one out, and see if it satisfies you. The Sony A7s has certainly satisfied me.

All the best to you, my friends!
Ashwin (July, 2014)

asha7s17

asha7s18

asha7s19

 

© 2009-2014 STEVE HUFF PHOTOS All Rights Reserved
21