Oct 292015

Oh my dog!

by Brigitte Hauser

Your blog is always a great Inspiration. Thought I share some of my dog photos. (Sorry, no cats!) I have taken them on my holidays in Italy (except the monochrome one). What I have noticed is, people are really proud if you take a photo of their dog. The picture I like most is the one without dog. The portrait of an old hunter. I met him on a hiking tour on the island of Elba. His hunting dog just has disappeared somewhere into the bushes… The last photo shows my own dog.

It’s a mix between terrier and hunting dog and he also likes disappearing sometimes:-). I used Leica Q, except for the monochrome picture. I sold my beloved Sony RX1 for the Q. I prefer the built-in EVF, the faster AF and the handling. And I think I prefer the look of the Q pictures, too. But perhaps it only seems so to me for justifying my change and the loss of money… What I don’t like is the lens cap of the Q. Mine has already broken, because it’s not fitting on the lens with the lens hood.










Many thanks


Oct 282015

A Pic a Day & Shooting the Sony RX1

by Caesar Lima

Hello Steve!

Last year I’ve decided to start a Project 365, one picture a day every day. I didn’t know that was such an effort coming up with a new image everyday, it became a great exercise I’m more aware visually and I carry a couple of cameras with me 24/7. Shooting this project with a mirrorless system was an easy decision but I was surprised that the RX-1 became the best option, the small size the full frame quality and the fast built-in lens makes this camera almost unbeatable for street and travel photography. Here are few images from my project, I hope you’ll enjoy.





Cheshire Cat











For more info please go to: www.365proj.com

Thank you

Caesar Lima



Project 365

Oct 272015

The terror of the Studio | Shooting Alice

By Massimiliano Tiberi

Dear Steve and Brandon what a wonderful summer of review and inspiration by your site and community!

Here I am again but with something different from my usual Street Photography.

Three weeks ago, for the first time , I received an assignment to shoot one young model approaching the fashion system, the term seems to be “new faces”. I was honoured to be chosen for such work but at the same time my experience in shooting in studio was really limited. But when chance appear to let it go is not so clever. I had something like two weeks to prepare my self for the shooting and that time was used to look at the Studio, understand the light, read books and chat with the Make Up Artist to give a direction to my shooting.

I have to admit that nothing can help a photographer more than a good book and the web : those can unlock the imagination of anyone around the world and helped me so much to understand how to do what I want to do. The terror I had at the beginning day by day start to disappear as much I got confidence studying lighting books, watching video on youtube and following some lessons on platform as Lynda.com or Kelbyone.com.

But there was another problem the last problem, the BIG problem: THE CAMERA. I never used a medium format camera, never used a digital back. I took the chance to go one week before to try the camera hired by the studio and hold an Hasselblad H2 with Phase One P40+ digital back is really incredible and when I saw the first testing shoot in the studio I freak out. Yes today, 40Mp are going to be the “standard” on 35mm camera as Sony did recently but on a medium format camera is still something so beautiful to to see. The H2 is a great camera, so easy to use and with so many feature, When you hold it on the hand you understand it was created for the studio. Yes it is big but not difficult to handle, with the gear where you expected to find it. It was a surprise for me but at the end the last problem was fixed.

For the lighting I choose a simple set up with one light over the model and one for the background and some light modifier to reach the style I was looking for. All the rest were done by the Model, the MUA and the lens.

Here some shot I took in studio, wishing is liked by you all reader!


attractive_face_AliceAlice full face


Some more here:

Oct 272015

Hi Steve,

I shoot available light. Always have, always will.I have owned and used a “Dream Lens” (Canon 0.95- but you know that) for years. It was modified for use on my M6 and M3  (by the way I had to modify the M3 to use it).


When I switched to m4/3 because that format would let me use my “legacy” Leica Glass, the Canon Lens had an efl of 100 mm and weighed almost as much as my DSLRs. That weight defeated my purpose. Using the Canon lens on Lumix digicams, the lens results on m4/3 were excellent. Lugging it around was quite another story. Imagine my delight, therefore, when I learned of the Mitakon 25mm 095 (efl 50mm). The lens was supposed to be released to consumers in late October- well, it’s late October and my supplier had no idea when he would be receiving the lens. Frankly, I couldn’t wait so I picked one up at PhotoPlusExpo for $399 the day before yesterday.I had to pay cash as they had no credit card  machines at the “China Pavillion”.

I used the Mitakon at the show but only at 0.95. Some of the results are attached. The lens is very tiny (comparatively speaking). It is even smaller than my Leica 25mm Summilux. The results are quite good. I also shot at the show with the Canon 0.95. I have provided one image for comparison.The images are limited in scope but you might find them interesting.

All images below are from the Mitakon except the last one, which is from the Canon 50 0.95. Digicams were 2 Lumix GX1s and a Lumix G3. The images were produced with my usual post processing.




The Canon Dream Lens…

CANON 0.95

Oct 212015

Explore the world and your cameras

By Bouwe

Dear Steve and Brandon,

A couple of things happened last years:

-I went to Nepal on holidays and realized that traveling is easy
-Therefore I went to Iran, shot some pics with a friends DSLR and met a guy with a Sony A7
-decided it was time to buy the Sony A7 with the 55 1.8& 35 2.8 (jan2015)
-found your amazing website and started following your blogs and daily inspiration
-holidays to Kirgistan and Tadjikistan and enjoyed the camera

From this last holiday I would like to post some pics and hope to learn from it myself as well. I hope it will encourage all readers to explore the world and their camera’s more. Often I wonder: why should one take a picture instead of painting it? All these shots were made while hiking. For that the 35mm f2.8 came in really handy. I shot all in JPEG and don’t do post processing yet (advice?).

The first obvious answer is: because sometimes things are beautiful for real, even though you can also paint it. This lake is in Kirgistan, with abundant Edelweiss.

Shot at 1/100, f7.1, iso400


The second answer: because you can shoot some motion or capture the decisive moment. The sheep picture is taken while in action: I saw the sheep coming down on the other side and had to run to take this picture.                       

Shot in Kirgistan, at 1/500, f11, iso200

Running Sheep

The third answer is: because you can trick&see things that normally can’t be seen, often in the night. Shooting at night is great when camping: The skies are often much clearer than in lived areas, different sources of light can stand out, after dinner what else can you do? and the differences in light are less.

Shot in Tadjikistan, at 30sec, f5.6, iso 1000. (When shot at night it seemed ok due to low light, when looking during the day I realized it was to dark, and I should have checked the diagram, so this one is corrected for brightness.)


The fourth answer: because I can’t paint. I still am a beginner in photography, but I like it a lot! I guess that a possible answer to the question could also hold something with people, but I have to explore this area better! And any tips are more than welcome, also on composition, light & postprocessing etc!

Regards Bouwe

Oct 192015

The Palouse – The Elysian Fields of Visuals

By Olaf Sztaba

The last time we visited the Palouse region lush greens dominated the scenery. This time was different. Greens and yellows blended into browns and sand dune-like hills spread across the horizon as if a painter had replaced all the colours with just one. Despite this change, the placid beauty of the land captivated us once again.


The rising sun revealed an abundance of shapes and patterns, creating dream-like visuals. The lack of colours simplified the visuals and emphasized the beauty of the lines. The Palouse in the fall was very different from the loud and colourful Palouse of the spring but somehow equally beautiful, equally captivating.




Our initial plan was to welcome the rising sun at Steptoe Butte – the usual place for sunrise photography. But we got up late and instead captured the beauty of the place from random dirt roads. We were glad we did.

While well-known parks such as Yosemite or Grand Teton National Park have their own mega-popular spots, the Palouse offers you the unknown. Every dirt road hides a visual gem and it is up to you to discover it, which is what makes this place so special.




This is why Kasia and I believe that the Palouse is the best place in North America to learn composition. Sure, you can go to Steptoe Butte and the morning light will provide you with beautiful vistas without much effort on your part. No question, you will end up with one more photograph of the same. However, if you would like to see and feel YOUR WAY, take any dirt road around Palouse, think creatively, put in some effort and you will be rewarded with a creation like no other. That’s the beauty of the Palouse. That’s why the Palouse is a photographer’s Elysian Fields. Indeed, it’s a place like no other.

All images were taken with the Fuji X-T1 & XF 50-140mm F2.8 lens, processed in LR6.


Oct 152015

The Race of Gentlemen (with Fuji X and Canon 70D)

By James Conley

Every October, tattooed and heavily bearded men (and a few women) gather in Wildwood, New Jersey, and take over a section of the beach. With beer on tap, loud music, and louder motorcycles and cars, this motley crew waits for the tide to recede and then grinds up the sand racing antique vehicles down a quarter-mile. Known as The Race of Gentlemen, the event at first seems to be one of the most wrongly named.

Since the event was a spectacle, and I didn’t have to worry about being discrete, I set out to observe the event with three cameras: a Fuji X100s, XE-1, and a Canon 70D. Although “motorsports” often brings to mind long lenses and monopods, my interest in the event was more about the people than the racing. Thus, my lenses were almost all wide. I relied heavily on an older Canon L Series 17-35mm on a 70D, with the X100s outfitted with the 50mm Teleconverter. The XE-1 had a support role with the 55-200mm. I find the Fujis easier to work with in bright light, because exposure compensation is obvious. But the speed of the Canon can’t be beat.




Wandering through the crowd, what at first appears to be a lawless takeover by various biker gangs is anything but. The dress code is the first clue. High, laced boots, paired with jodhpurs. Pilot and horseback riding helmets. Knit jerseys lettered with race events seven decades past. The women sport short bangs with long hair, beehives, and Rosie the Riveter styles, paired with high-waisted, pinstriped shorts.

Then there are the bikes. These aren’t the Harley-Davidson’s you’ve seen on television. They are long. And old. Very old. Mixed in is the occasional Henderson and a smattering of Indians, all with huge engines. The cars are likewise all American: Mercury, Buick, Pontiac, Dodge, Plymouth, Ford, and Chrysler. Model A’s, coupes, and roadsters. Each one a piece of moving history, and each one with a driver or rider whose knuckles show the years of effort it took to rebuild these machines to working order.




Then there are the smiles. Broad and warm, the smiles are constant. Every face is marked with joy, even when the car won’t start, even when the bike doesn’t turn over.

Then it becomes obvious that this isn’t a random gathering of ne’er do wells. This is an effort to capture a specific time in history, and to relive the best parts of it. The cars are all American made, 1953 or older. The bikes are all American made, 1947 or older. The clothes, helmets, and goggles are also antique. And so is the definition of “Gentlemen.”




This gathering is, in fact, about being a gentleman. Those who build, enter, and race their machines exhibit the good, courteous, and polite conduct befitting the title. Despite the sand, the grease, the noise, the competition, and even the alcohol, each racer stays true to gentlemanly form: quick to lend a hand, always with a charming smile, undisturbed by adversity, and always stylish. It is a set of values not of the present time, and the strict rules for entering the race make perfect sense: The Race of Gentlemen is not about racing cars and motorcycles down a beach; The Race of Gentlemen is about recapturing the American can-do spirit, the generosity, the love of life, and the camaraderie that come from choosing to be part of the human race, as a gentleman.






I’m happy to share with you this brief photo-essay of a day of vintage racing.

More images can be seen on my website: http://f-eleven.com, and on Instagram: @philatawgrapher

Oct 112015


Volunteering: When Free is Priceless.

Most photographers love what they do, some validation is always nice and, if we happen to be able to make a living too, it’s the best job in the world. But being part of even a small exhibition in a major gallery isn’t something most of us dare imagine – nice as it is to dream about. So I can’t describe how delighted I have been to see my work on the walls of Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery at the moment as part of the ‘West Midlands Fire Service Volunteer Photographers’ Exhibition’.

I was invited to volunteer with West Midlands after the team saw my work in the lead up to the ‘Vintage Photographer of the Year’ awards 2013. Now I’m on call several nights a week and part of the weekends too and whatever I’m asked to do, I know it won’t be dull. Whether it’s an emergency or a training exercise, publicity event or crisis-simulation, it’s always different and the documentary aspect of the work is fascinating and very satisfying – it’s the other end of the spectrum to my studio work, the event (crisis or exercise) won’t stop for good light, or a good angle.


I hope those of you who can will go and see the exhibition while it is up, for the rest of you here are some other images from a special-ops training exercise with the team responsible for dealing with post-impact in the event of explosions or building collapse. Structural damage and a volatile environment are a huge challenge in these situations and conditions were simulated by filling a small warehouse unit with debris, trashed cars and rubble, then killing the lights to recreate a ‘collapsed car park aftermath’. It was pitch black, for many this is a photographer’s worst possible set-up, fair to say. So the shots you see were lit only by a couple of lamps firefighters pulled in through crawl spaces, and their helmet lamps. Fortunately I found a great vantage point – without getting in the way – and set the M240 and cron 90mm to f/2, ISO 1600-3200 leaving the shutter to do its thing (around 1/45). In post it took a bit of noise reduction, but I have to admit I was pretty amazed at the results.





Volunteering isn’t a sure route to your first exhibition by any means, that’s just a happy coincidence or icing on the cake. The real satisfaction is the work and being usefully involved with a dedicated team who provide an invaluable service 24/7 in some of the most demanding and dangerous circumstances imaginable. It’s been a real eye-opener for me over the past few years. Would I recommend it? Definitely, without hesitation, it’s an incredible opportunity to expand your range and contribute to a worthwhile cause at the same time. And, as my experience shows, you never know where it will lead.

If you are in the west midlands of the UK, the WMFS is always on the lookout for more volunteers and you can contact them here: [email protected] If the link in the article didnt make it online here’s the link again: http://www.birminghammuseums.org.uk/bmag/whats-on/west-midlands-fire-service-volunteer-photographers-exhibition

If you live elsewhere, I’m sure your local charities and public services all have an equivalent – who knows what your next shoot may be?
Best regards,

John Tuckey



Oct 052015

Canon EOS M Review (Or Why I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Camera)

By Jonathan Acierto


Hello Steve and Brandon,

The Canon EOS M got a lot of bad reviews when it first came out. It was basically dead on arrival due to all of its shortcomings and perceived lack of effort on Canon’s part to design a camera that could rival the other mature mirrorless system cameras from Sony, Olympus, Panasonic, and Fuji. So when it came time to choose a mirrorless camera to carry around to replace my Sony RX100 compact, I chose the Canon EOS M. Why on earth would I choose the apparently worse mirrorless offering? I’ve been using it for a little while now and, even with all its shortcomings, let me explain why I’m happy with the EOS M.


When the EOS M was first released, it was originally priced for retail at about $800 for the kit with the 22mm f/2 pancake lens. Ever since the camera flopped, the price has been dramatically reduced to about $379 for the same kit on Amazon, and even less for the body only. You know what that means: really low used prices. Heading over to the fantastic KEH, I was able to get an EOS M with the 18-55mm kit lens for under $300, less than I paid for the RX100. Even compared to the entry level m43 cameras, the EOS M is a steal. Kudos to all of you who have enough disposable income to buy top of the line mirrorless cameras and glass from Leica, Sony, Fuji, Olympus, Panasonic, etc. Reading headlines of people who have multiple mirrorless cameras and can buy f/-1.0 lenses for all of them makes me jealous. But for the rest of us folks who have a limited amount of disposable income, price is and always will be a major factor.




While the photographic community has shunned the EOS M, the video community has embraced it and it has become somewhat of a cult video camera. I was originally looking to get a camcorder, but entry level enthusiast camcorders with relatively larger sensors start around $1,000. I simply wasn’t interested in getting a consumer grade camcorder due to the small sensors, hence the lack of DOF control. Entry level HDDSLR’s and high end superzooms (like the Sony RX10) have become a great value for getting professional looking video, but they are still relatively bulky and the ergonomics aren’t the best for video. Action cameras are tiny and can withstand all kinds of abuse, but they are just not designed for shooting everyday videos of your kids (unless your kids are surfing or riding a dirt bike and you want to get footage from their point of view).

The EOS M has became a popular camera to use for video because it has a large sensor which enables it to get the same DOF control as HDDSLR’s, it has a mic input so you can get better audio by connecting a much higher quality mic, and it is very compact and light weight, perfect for run and gun video shooting. Years ago I had a Canon Rebel T1i and I loved using it for video, but it didn’t have autofocus or tracking focus in video mode, so I had to manually focus. After a while, manual focus became a real chore. If I was a DP or first AC, I’d probably do a better job with manual focus, but I’m just not that good. The EOS M has auto and tracking focus in video mode. It’s not perfect by any means, and other mirrorless system cameras have better auto and tracking focus in video, but the EOS M is still better in most situations compared to my crappy mannual focusing. Keeping the aperture closed down a bit to get a deeper depth of field helps too. While having a razor thin DOF in a still photo is all the rage nowadays, having a razor thin depth of field for long lengths of time in video footage is now cliche and tends to get really monotonous and hard to watch. Video is a whole different art compared to photography, all you have to do is pay attention to what you see in movies and on TV. In the video world, shallow DOF is used very sparingly.



Operational Speed

Trying to use the EOS M like a DSLR or enthusiast camera sucks, and sometimes it can be painful (sounds like the complaints about the original Fuji X100, doesn’t it?). I’m used to just pointing the camera towards the subject, half pressing the shutter button to acquire focus, and pressing the shutter button all the way down once the camera gets focus. With the Sony RX100, I’m able to get focus and snap a photo or 2 of people on a sidewalk while I’m in a moving car. Letting the EOS M decide what to focus on is a crap shoot, it could focus on the correct subject fairly quickly, or it could take a while to hunt for focus. The slow focus is the main reason why the camera has been criticized so heavily.

Then I had a revelation: the EOS M was designed for regular consumers who are used to a smartphone touch interface. This may be obvious at first, and many reviewers mentioned this, but it’s easy to forget if you’re an enthusiast or professional who normally uses a DSLR, mirrorless system camera, or other more advanced camera. Once I started using the touchscreen to focus, the camera felt much quicker to use. Using the touch screen to focus, then pressing the shutter button to take the photo, works much like my iPhone. The EOS M also does a fairly decent job tracking the subject once you acquire focus via the touch UI. It’s also much quicker to change settings (white balance, ISO, etc.) using the touchscreen compared to using the physical buttons and wheel to dive into menus. People always complain that camera interfaces are stone age, but Canon designed a pretty good touch interface for the EOS M, and reviewers complained it’s too touch oriented for more serious photographers. Go figure.

The biggest slow down after getting over the touch UI focusing seems to be after pressing the shutter button all the way down. The camera takes almost a full second to write to the memory card. I’m not entirely sure why this process is so slow, as the camera can write 1080P video at 30fps to the card without any slowdowns. Is it annoying? It can be, especially when I’m trying to fire off 2 or 3 shots quickly as I do with the Sony RX100 or Canon 6D. Does the slow write speed stop me from shooting the moments I’m trying to capture? No. I actually think the slow write time helps slow me down and be more selective of my shots. With my Canonet QL17 GIII 35mm film rangefiner, I have to wind the film after every shot, so I’m used to not being able to take shots in quick succession. With the EOS M, I’m shooting more in the Cartier-Bresson, wait for the decisive moment style, rather than spraying and praying.

Hagerstown Road Trip 10-3-2015 - 1 of 1

Image Quality

It’s good, what more do you need to know? Just look at the photos. We’re at a point where any camera with a sensor 1″ or larger can take fantastic photos, the only limitation is the quality of the lenses. While the native EF-M mount lenses aren’t professional L glass quality, they’re good. I’d even say they’re better than the older, pre-STM Canon DSLR EF-S mount crop sensor lenses I’ve used. The EF-M 22mm f/2 STM (35mm full frame equivalent) is certainly as good as any of the mid level Canon EF USM prime lenses, it’s about 1/4 of the price, and it’s tiny. Putting this lens on the M makes it almost as compact at the Sony RX100. I don’t plan on using the EF-M 18-55mm IS zoom lens much for stills, but it’s more than good enough for shooting 1080p video. The image stabilization really helps to eliminate vomit-inducing camera shake.

Huntington Pioneer Festival 9-27-2015 - 1 of 1

Closing Thoughts

For all the talk of the convergence of stills and motion in one camera, it still hasn’t quite happened yet in the enthusiast/professional space. In the consumer world, I think the iPhone and smartphones have become the only camera normal people need for stills and videos, making smartphones true convergence devices. That leaves pros and enthusiasts as the only people left who are willing to spend money on a separate camera and/or camcorder.

Mirrorless system cameras have changed the stills world and HDDSLR’s have changed the motion camera world, so it makes sense that the newest convergence cameras will be a combination of those two devices. Mirrorless system cameras are gaining better video capabilities all the time, but Canon started the HDDSLR revolution, so they are coming at the mirrorless world from the opposite direction of taking the HDDSLR video capabilities and cramming them into the EOS M. They did a good job, all they need to do now is match the stills photography performance of their entry level DSLR’s. I think they’re getting there; the reviews for the third generation EOS M3 have been very good. Canon has had plenty of time to improve the M since the original was released 3 years ago. The reviews of the M3 have been so good that Canon decided to release the M3 in the US after initially announcing they wouldn’t. A couple more iterations of the EOS M and they’ll not only catch up to the other mirrorless cameras, but they may even surpass them. In the meantime, I’ll have my EOS M in hand, capturing fantastic videos and photos and having a blast.

All the photos included with this review were shot with the 22mm f/2 EF-M STM lens. For more of my photos, please visit my Flckr page:


Jonathan V. Acierto

Sep 302015

A Hot Summer in Rome

by Massimiliano Tiberi

Dear Steve how are you!

I am here in Rome waiting for the autumn looking back at what I shot this summer and I would like to share with you all my roll of film done with the Leica M2 and a great Tri-X. So refreshing to shot with a so simple camera.

Rome in August can be very hot and the city is a bit empty and lonely but so interesting because something that is hidden became more visible. The people in Rome are so incredibly surrounded by masterpieces that sometimes you forget the living ones to focus on what was done by the ancient inhabitant of this city.

Something of the beauty of this city is fading away so do not miss the chance to visit soon.

more if you like there : http://blog.massimilianotiberi.com/rome-in-an-empty-summer/

I wish you can enjoy :-)










Sep 292015

The Sony A7R (Mk 1) in Japan

by Michael Morris

Dear Steve and Brandon:

I have been reading your site daily for the last few years and have enjoyed reading your reviews and guest posts. I started my venture into the mirrorless world from Nikon with the purchase of the Leica M9 and 3 Leica M lenses in 2010. I tried micro four thirds and APS –C sensors and came to the conclusion that I am a full frame shooter. Over the last year I made some changes in my list of cameras. I sold my Olympus OMD–EM5, my Fujifilm XT-1, and my Leica M9. I now have a Nikon D800E, which I use for portrait work and sports, and a Sony A7R which I use for travel or when I want to travel light. I am anxiously waiting for my A7Rii to ship.

I recently traveled to Japan and brought my Sony A7R with the Sony/Zeiss FE 55mm f 1.8, Sony/Zeiss FE 35 mm f 1.4, Leica M 90 mm f 2.0 APO, Leica Super-Elmer 21 mm f 3.4 (borrowed), and my Nikkor G 14-24 mm f 2.8. I strongly considered purchasing the Sony/Zeiss FE 16-35mm for the trip. In the end I decided to bring the Nikkor zoom despite its size, and use something that I already owned. I used Novoflex adapters for both the Leica and Nikkor lenses.

Here are some sample photos.

Shibuya Crossing – Sony A7R with Nikkor G 14-24 mm f 2.8 ISO 200 1/250 sec


Sumo Wrestling Close shot – Sony A7R with Leica M 90 mm f 2.0 APO – ISO 1600 1/640 sec f 3.4


Sumo wrestling – Wide shot – Sony A7R with Leica Super-Elmer 21 mm f 3.4 – ISO 1600 1/100 sec f 3.4


Leica Store Tokyo – Sony A7R with Sony/Zeiss FE 35 mm ISO 200 1/100 sec f 5.6


Mount Fuji taken from the Shinkansen Nozomi at 170 mph Sony/Zeiss FE 35 mm ISO 200 – 1/200 sec f 4.0


Lobby of Ritz Carlton Kyoto –Sony A7R with Sony/Zeiss FE 35 mm ISO 200 1/4000 sec f 2.0


Maiko – Sony A7R with Sony/Zeiss FE 35 mm ISO 6400 1/250 f 4.0


Kinkaku-ji (The Golden Pavilion) Kyoto – Sony A7R with Sony/Zeiss FE 35 mm ISO 400 1/640 sec f 4.0


Michael Morris MD

Ocala, Florida USA

Sep 232015

Leaving Mexico City

by Alejandro Ilukewitsch

Hi Steve,

Soon I will be moving out of Mexico and wanted to share with you and your readers some of my pics from my stay in this wonderful country.

Mexico is great city for street photography, people is warm and definitely like their portrait been taken. It’s a huge city, in which it only takes a bit of luck to bump into something interesting to shoot. I focus mostly in street portraits, but also managed to get some other things :).

I used different kinds of cameras Nikon DF, Sony A7ii, and Leica M240. No specific reason for the cameras, I just love all of them :)

Exif data should be intact. Hope your readers enjoy these pics as much as I enjoyed Mexico, and if anyone is thinking of passing through here a few days, please don’t doubt it, you will be surprise how great it could be.

DSC_9732 (1)







L1008370 (1)



L1006586 (2)








Sorry for posting so many :)

More of my pictures can be seen in:


Thanks for looking!

Sep 212015

A night of Post Processing

By Dirk Dom

What a night!

I did ten black and white shots of my San Francisco trip.

At first, I got all crazy about printing big and I wanted drum scans made. Since that, and printing four feet would see me bankrupt, I used my own scans and enjoyed these.

I’ll print 12 x 18 inches, 30 x 45 cm, on Baryta paper. With my own scans I can go to 24 inches, 60 cm at 300 DPI.

This was a night of calm creativity and intense concentration.

Ansel Adams, the greatest printer that ever lived, said: “the negative is the score, the print the performance”. I performed tonight.

I’m deeply grateful I can do this.

The tools I use would make any Photoshop specialist laugh so hard he’d get cramps, but I use them until I can’t make the print any better. I do burning and dodging, a little bit of levels, mainly to check if I reach the black and white limits (ALT key), that’s all. Of course the images need spotting. Photoshop is as refined as you want, no limit.

Usually I have a very vivid idea about the potential of the print and what I want it to become, getting there is usually not difficult but takes lots of time.

Well, here they are, I didn’t include shots of the city because buildings don’t fit in this series.

This one I made very high key to offset the jet black charred stump and the rest of the Redwood forest.


Here I think I got the range of light in the forest.


Another jet black stump.


The bank of a creek in Ukiah. This shot is so sharp you see every thread of moss on the trees. It screams “Enlarge me BIG!!!”


My son.


One afternoon, the clouds were just magic in Ukiah. I was out for hours watching it all evolve.





Finally, I include this city shot, because of the nice sky: San Francisco from Bernal Heights. I think that’s the best view of the city.


I’m so glad that last year I decided to go for film and not for digital black and white. There are always beautiful structures in the negative, often totally unexpected.

Like the cloud in the San Francisco shot:


No way you can get such a thing digitally! (Does Nik software emulate this? I’d like to know) Such structures make a print glow. A print shows this sort of detail, to discover and enjoy.
I think there is nothing more beautiful in photography than fine black and white.

Well, enough.



If it doesn’t look good as a thumbnail, it’s no good.



Sep 182015

Photo’s with a Story

By Dirk Dom


When I show people my photographs many ask me what exactly they are seeing. That is a reasonable question, because I shoot quite a lot of abstracts. I generally tell them to appreciate the images on their own grounds. Most people, however, expect photographs to be representative and are not accustomed to having to use their imagination.

I made a booklet which originated as an exercise in playful interpretation of my photos. I picked out about seventy that I particularly liked and challenged myself to create tales inspired by the images. It proved surprisingly difficult. Some of my images seem so simple and have such an impact that I couldn’t think of anything. In some cases I made up stories; in others I wrote down impressions inspired by what I was looking at — what ever came to mind, and sometimes, when the creation of the photo itself was a good story, I shared that too. At random intervals I had left the reader/observer the opportunity to make up a story himself.

This is an excerpt of the book with ten photographs.


The photo above is exercise one. What does it make you think of?

Alien Encounter

A Star Seed floats through space, on its way to the core of the Galaxy to reproduce. Its solar sail is folded up, so far away from any star.

A Guffaw, who normally eats cometary cores, sees the Star Seed as a delightful snack.

The Star Seed reacts to its approach with a giant electric discharge. Intense plasma wires light up in the interstellar medium.

The Guffaw changes its mind and its direction.

The Star Seed floats on, on its journey of millions of years, on track to another star.

With thanks to Larry Niven


Brown Dwarf Life Form

DENIS-P J082303.1-491201 b, part of an ultra cold binary system, has a mass of about 28 Jupiter masses. This brown dwarf is 67.7 light-years or 399 trillion miles from Earth. It was discovered in 2013.

The life which developed there consists of twenty-mile long single-celled organisms (hydrogen filled bubbles made out of polyethylene) who float in the atmosphere and are bioluminescent. These are colonized by photosynthetic organisms. Seemingly there are similarities with the life on Jupiter.

The photograph is made in May, 2144, by the Da Vinci atmospheric probe which flew through a life form, filming, during its descent to the core.

Exploration of brown dwarves is considered a low priority.


Drowning Moth

Beginning of March, 2014, I walked in the Zevenbergen Forest, Ranst.

On the banks of the ditches you can make photographs with lots of contrast, so I walked along the water.

About six feet from shore, this drowning moth. I planned to save it, but first, a quick photograph. A first image without paying attention to composition. Then, this image, with the moth carefully lined up in the dark reflection of a tree. I wanted to take a few more photographs, but the wave pattern the wings made stopped after about five seconds and didn’t start again. I was disappointed. Suddenly I realized the moth was dying and it was finished.

Quickly I looked for a branch, but the only one I found was too short. Pity. The moth no doubt served as a protein rich delicacy to a bird or a frog. It’s a beautiful, but sad shot.

Life is so easily extinguished.


Nuclear blast

I was happily taking shots of forest anemones when World War Three started. The bomb incinerated the Antwerp port at twenty miles distance.

I live, but what good does it do? The anemones bloomed for the last time.



Microvilli (singular: Microvillus, lat. Villus “brushy hair (from animals), wool”) are microscopic protuberances of the cellular membrane which drastically increase the surface of cells. Microvilli are found in the brush border of the small intestine. Because of the large surface macromolecules and ions can be absorbed more easily.

The brush border is the homogeneous layer which is visible at the apical side of the enterocytes (absorbing cells in the small intestine) and the epithelial cells in the proximal tubulus. If this tissue is looked at through a light microscope, one can see that the brush border consists of a great number of very closely stacked microvilli. These microvilli make for a twentyfold increase of the small intestine surface. This increase in surface makes the intake of nourishment much easier.


Me, as a Photographer

This is a fun one.

So I went to take this photograph. At first I wanted to go alone, but I took my sister Nadine along to take the shot.

I hung about ten camera’s around my neck and arranged them in such a way that they showed nicely. But this hopelessly entangled the straps.

After about five minutes the forty pounds of camera started to really hurt and I wanted to take them off.

I couldn’t unknot them. The weight became unbearable. In the end I had to lie down and make my sister disentangle them.

I don’t want to think about what would have happened if I had done this alone.


Love is:
Putting your paws on the eyes of your beloved.



This is how the Daft Punk music looks to Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo.

The Visisonor, developed by the University of Antwerp in 2017, translates the impressions of the other senses to a visual signal.

Apple bought the patent.

In 2019 110 million Visisonors were sold, despite the violent price tag.

With Thanks to Isaac Asimov


Second Exercise

Oh, yes, believe it or not, this is a photograph!

I can’t make up any story with this.

Can you?


Well, hope you enjoyed it!

And, my apologies!



Sep 162015

Ireland with the Olympus E-M1. A Photographic Journey

by Tom Ohle

My name is Tom and I’m from Ireland. A few years back while visiting my beautiful fiance in Canada I kicked my love for photography into over drive!

Your site is fantastic and largely responsible for fuelling my love for photography. For me it’s the equivalent of a great cup of coffee first thing in the morning.

These next two images are from my favourite place of all. The west coast of Ireland in Co. Kerry just off of the Dingle peninsula at a little place called ‘Inch Strand’. It’s a spectacular part of the world with huge wide beaches as far as the eye can see.

EM1 + Nocticron
“The Kite”


EM1 + Nocticron
“Misty Beach”


The west coast of Ireland (particularly Co. Kerry) is known around the world for its spectacular cliffs. If you ever make it to this part of the world check out Sleigh Head.
This next one was shot overlooking the peninsula. I set out not knowing what to expect and stumbled across this huge hill that overlooked the main peninsula providing a stunning view. I improvised a quick fashion shoot – lighting was very overcast – perfect natural soft box!

EM1 + Nocticron
“He left me in Ireland”


For the most part I like street photography and travel portraiture but I try not to pidgeon-hole myself into a particular genre. I’ve taken my camera and lenses around Ireland and the great white North in Canada. From portraits of random people on the street to portraits of wolves and wolf dogs I generally always have a camera in my hand.

EM1 + Oly 45 1.8
“We need to talk”


I find that the images that I am most drawn to from your other writers tend to have people in them. Either obvious images of people directly or may not so obvious images of landscapes that show the mark of peoples involvement. In more recent times having read some of Neil Buchanan Grants posts here I’ve been inspired to approach my subjects and subject matter from the perspective of a travel photographer. Even in my home town I try to ask ‘ what would be really cool and interesting about this place that I could show somebody in a completely different part of the world ‘.

EM1 + Oly 45
“Who are you lookin at?”


Em1 + PanaLeica 25 1.4
“Violinist on the street”


Busking and street performing are very popular and a large part of Irish city culture. A walk down Dublin’s Grafton street on a Saturday afternoon is an explosion for the senses. Stilt walkers, dancers, acrobats doing back flips, fire breathers – it’s got it all. The shot of the busker was taken in Co. Cork – many of these performers are very street photo friendly and do not mind you taking their photo once you acknowledge them. No better way than by throwing them a few euro :)

“Rebel without a cause”


Dublin has a bunch of really cool locally owned coffee shops. Unfortunately we are seeing more and more big chain coffee shops pop up about the place but thankfully the locals still support the local businesses. Many of these coffee shops make a cool studio for european style impromptu photoshoots!

Sunset in (not on) the Liffey!


For me, a photo has not completed it’s journey until it has been developed and printed. The printing aspect is a recent discovery and I have very much fallen in love with this aspect of the creative process. I now shoot for the print.

Fine art giclee prints on fiber paper are gorgeous. I spend hours trying to get the balance between the choice of edit, the type of paper, texture, color calibration etc… holding a finished product in my hand is immensely satisfying.

I’m very much a learner with a lot yet to learn but I’d hope to have my first article published and open to constructive criticism and feedback from the community. Thank you for taking the time out of your day to look at my photos and I hope that you enjoyed them.

My flickr is : https://www.flickr.com/photos/24434110@N05/




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