May 192016
 

Three from Me

by David Jones

Hi,

The Gent covering his face was a street shot taken in a Sheffield cafe in UK. He sat next to me and my family, ordered soup and sat with his head in his hands until his order arrived. It was taken with a Fuji XT1 35mm 1.4 lens. To me its a shot that makes me pleased that I always carry a camera.

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The shot of the man and baby was taken As I was testing light for another shot I was about to take for a personal project I had been working on. The project was called intimate-inanimate and centered upon individuals and their most personal single possession. This shot was just taken as he held his child whilst I set the lighting. It was taken on Canon 5d mk3 and 85mm 1.8.

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The landscape was also taken on a 5d mk3 and was shot In Fleetwood Uk. I was shooting a local press story but the subject was running late so I took my camera for a walk on a nearby beach and found this scene, another reason to always have a camera handy and to look for scenes and subjects you may not be originally looking for.

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Dave

May 182016
 

Fabricated Landscape

By Olaf Sztaba

We have thought about photographing the Canadian Oil Sands for a long time. Finally, this year we drove to Fort McMurray – the hub for oil sands operations. Even though we approached the subject from a purely visual perspective, what we encountered made a huge impact on us.

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This land stretches 54,826 square miles, an area larger than England. Structures such as the toxic tailing lakes are some of the largest human-made structures in the world – so large that they can be seen from space. The land has been rearranged, altered and manipulated by human activity to the point that it is barely recognizable but so visually appealing – so ugly but strangely beautiful.

As we photographed this area, we had no clue that just two weeks later Fort McMurray and the oil sands operations surrounding it, would be threatened by massive wildfires. So far this huge fire has triggered an evacuation of the entire city of Fort McMurray or nearly 90,000 people. As I write this note, the fire has been moving north toward massive oil sands operations.

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Below please find a link to the Canadian Red Cross website, which accepts donations and helps those impacted. Please consider donating.

http://www.redcross.ca

www.olafphotoblog.com

www.olafphoto.squarespace.com

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The entire project was shot with the Fuji X-Pro2 paired with the XF 50-140mm or XF 14mm F2.8 and Fuji X100S.

Feb 092016
 
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Mirrorless Revolution – Fantastic Video from Parker J Pfister  – Sony A7RII

Came across this video today created by photographer Parker J Pfister where he talks about the Sony A7RII and shows what he does with it in so many creative ways. INSPIRING. Amazing work, fantastic video and spot on. Enjoy! Be sure to check out his website HERE. Parker is putting that A7RII to great use.

Parker J Pfister walks through his transformation into a mirrorless studio. With the new Sony A7Rii in his hand he has his perfect translator. (please be advised!!! This video is pretty low tech and un-polished. The Audio is a touch off towards the end. It was a one take shot and I’m going with it.I know this. Just trying to get my point of view out there as I am re-charged as a photographer by a new way to create and I just want to pass it on.) Have an awesome day and keep on clickin’ .PJ

Parker J Pfister’s Mirrorless Revolution. from Parker J Photography on Vimeo.

Jan 132016
 

The Power of Imagery

by Sebastian Szyszka

Hi Steve and Brandon,

Been enjoying your site for a while, especially the positivity it exudes. It’s a nice change of pace.

I started shooting sometime between the ages of 7 and 10 while I lived in Germany with my parents. We were Polish refugees waiting to come to America. One of my birthday presents during that time was a plastic 110 camera that I absolutely loved, which was quickly upgraded to a Polaroid. It was the Polaroid, decades before I ever read the words “decisive moment,” that taught me the power of photography. I didn’t gravitate towards posed stuff, I reveled in the moment. Real, unscripted, often ambushed. Those images were ones I was not used to seeing because most shots around me were “say cheese” kind of shots. Looking back at it, I still remember the first image that struck that chord with me. Can’t share it though, my poor mother would kill me…

The power of imagery has always stuck with me. Nowadays photography is a quick, immediate balance against the daily routine of being an advertising artist. The two go hand in hand, and both strengthen and compliment each other.

I’m including three images, one that I took of a friend of mine, and two of my street stuff that keeps me sane on my Chicago commutes.

The first shot is of my friend and coworker Jeff on his custom 1967 Shovelhead. What makes the image special to me is the fact that it was taken in his father’s gas station, which was built-in the 1920’s. A lot of heritage and vintage in one frame. My only regret was not getting Jeff’s father in the shot. Alas, he was not there that day. Taken with a Sony a6000 and Voigtlander 15mm f/4.5. Lit with some wirelessly triggered strobes layered on top of available light. Post work in LR.

Click it for larger and better version!

Jeff and his custom 1967 Shovelhead

The second shot is of a “poet for hire” near Bourbon St. in New Orleans. For a small fee and 30 minutes of waiting, they write a bespoke poem for you. Taken with a Sony a6000 and Voigtlander 15mm f/4.5. Post work in LR.

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The third shot of a man exiting a train is from one of my old commutes on the “L” Train in Chicago. Shot with a Sony NEX-5 and 16mm f/2.8 with fisheye attachment. Post work in Aperture with some Nik SilverEfex 2.

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(I know, a lot of Sony, but my favorite camera by far is my X100T. I use both for their unique strengths.)

Thanks and keep doing what you’re doing,

Sincerely,

Sebastian Szyszka

www.sebastianszyszka.com
500px.com/sebastiand
www.flickr.com/photos/sebastiand/

Oct 112015
 

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Volunteering: When Free is Priceless.

Most photographers love what they do, some validation is always nice and, if we happen to be able to make a living too, it’s the best job in the world. But being part of even a small exhibition in a major gallery isn’t something most of us dare imagine – nice as it is to dream about. So I can’t describe how delighted I have been to see my work on the walls of Birmingham Museum & Art Gallery at the moment as part of the ‘West Midlands Fire Service Volunteer Photographers’ Exhibition’.

I was invited to volunteer with West Midlands after the team saw my work in the lead up to the ‘Vintage Photographer of the Year’ awards 2013. Now I’m on call several nights a week and part of the weekends too and whatever I’m asked to do, I know it won’t be dull. Whether it’s an emergency or a training exercise, publicity event or crisis-simulation, it’s always different and the documentary aspect of the work is fascinating and very satisfying – it’s the other end of the spectrum to my studio work, the event (crisis or exercise) won’t stop for good light, or a good angle.

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I hope those of you who can will go and see the exhibition while it is up, for the rest of you here are some other images from a special-ops training exercise with the team responsible for dealing with post-impact in the event of explosions or building collapse. Structural damage and a volatile environment are a huge challenge in these situations and conditions were simulated by filling a small warehouse unit with debris, trashed cars and rubble, then killing the lights to recreate a ‘collapsed car park aftermath’. It was pitch black, for many this is a photographer’s worst possible set-up, fair to say. So the shots you see were lit only by a couple of lamps firefighters pulled in through crawl spaces, and their helmet lamps. Fortunately I found a great vantage point – without getting in the way – and set the M240 and cron 90mm to f/2, ISO 1600-3200 leaving the shutter to do its thing (around 1/45). In post it took a bit of noise reduction, but I have to admit I was pretty amazed at the results.

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Volunteering isn’t a sure route to your first exhibition by any means, that’s just a happy coincidence or icing on the cake. The real satisfaction is the work and being usefully involved with a dedicated team who provide an invaluable service 24/7 in some of the most demanding and dangerous circumstances imaginable. It’s been a real eye-opener for me over the past few years. Would I recommend it? Definitely, without hesitation, it’s an incredible opportunity to expand your range and contribute to a worthwhile cause at the same time. And, as my experience shows, you never know where it will lead.

If you are in the west midlands of the UK, the WMFS is always on the lookout for more volunteers and you can contact them here: [email protected] If the link in the article didnt make it online here’s the link again: http://www.birminghammuseums.org.uk/bmag/whats-on/west-midlands-fire-service-volunteer-photographers-exhibition

If you live elsewhere, I’m sure your local charities and public services all have an equivalent – who knows what your next shoot may be?
Best regards,

John Tuckey

http://john.tuckey.photography

http://www.facebook.com/jrtvintage

Feb 172015
 

Another photographer’s 365 project.

By Hilmar Buch

I can hear you guys sighing… but please keeping reading.

As many other photographers I decided to do a 365 project which for me meant to take a photo every single day throughout the entire year of 2013. Yes, we are talking 2013. It’s only a few days ago that I eventually finished off this project. Of course, I took all the photos in 2013 but editing and processing my images took until this time of year (February 2015).

01 January Binoculars

Apart from some wedding jobs I love to do as the primary shooter for friends and colleagues I am not a professional photographer. Thus, carrying out a 365 days photo project forced me to cope with the normal workload in my regular job as well as to convince myself to look for photo opportunities regardless of whether I felt tired or unmotivated. And I can tell you that this happened rather often.

For example, my girlfriend and I did some extensive traveling in 2013 to Namibia (see my earlier report on Steve’s website HERE.  Also Portugal HERE. As easy as it is to go with the flow on your vacation and feel inspired by the people you meet and the landscapes you see, the difficult it is to withstand the creative gap after being back home. If you have a look at the photos I took the days right after returning home, you can clearly see how bad these photos are because I did not feel inspired at all.

02 February Travelling across the universe

Or imagine your regular work day that sometimes can be really challenging. Feeling extremely exhausted when leaving the office in the cold dark winter night makes it hard to feel motivated to find a great photo opportunity, in particular if you only want to get home as fast as possible or have other personal obligations to meet. Taking a decent photo under these circumstances is not easy and a few times I felt like stopping my photo project from one day to another.

03 March Munich in the 1960s

These are the bad feeling that naturally arose but I do not want to complain at all as I enjoyed doing what I did! I did not give up.

I did the project just for myself in order to progress and to work with continuity on my photography skills. It definitely paid off I find. Although I do not know whether I got any better in the course of 2013 I can say that going out and just doing it yielded some photos I would never have gotten if I had not taken the effort to try. Without carrying out the project I would have taken far less photos and I would not have carried the camera with me almost all the time (I rather wore the camera than just took it with me…).

04 April Crane Stories - old vs new

05 Mai The silhouette

And often when I had no desire to shoot and when I was sure I would not enjoy it I was rewarded big time. My mood changed while I was taking photos and sometimes I met interesting people or found interesting places I would never have seen if I had stayed at home. So this was something I learned. By hindsight this experience means more to me than improving my photography skills although the latter were the primary reason for getting me started.

07 July Untouchable

09 September Street portrait

10 Oktober Lisboa you love or hate it

When I have a look at my photos these days, I am of course not content with every photo I took. Most of the photos are not special and just depict everyday life. But that is absolutely alright with me. I must not forget that for an entire year I got off my backside every single day and tried to capture something. The project is not about the single image but about my feelings, my challenge for power of endurance and me trying to do the best under the specific conditions.

06 June No standing

As I cannot show off all the photos I took in 2013, I chose one picture per month. If you want to have a look at the entire project, please follow the link to my website which can be found here:
http://hilminson.com/album/threesixfive-13?p=1

Cheers,
Hilmar

Jan 122015
 

The Panasonic LX7. A $349 Backup to my Leica M

by John Kurniawan

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Hi Steve and Brandon…Wish you both a Great 2015!

Bought a Panasonic LX7 as a back up to my M system.

I choose LX7 as a camera for my daughter as well a back up cam when I am traveling. Why LX7 ? Just love its size and features which suit my need like macro, zoom and manual mode. The manual mode comes handy when in low light condition so I can mimic the RF experience.

Almost a year with LX7, both my girl and me are happy with it, here are some the photo produce by this funtastic cam. Ones can produce good photo no matter what the camera is, most important is how ones capture lights correctly.

Thank you and hope to see more good post by talented photographer at your site

Best Rgds

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Jan 082015
 

Me and my Fuji X100 (original)

by Jonas Luis

Hi, Steve!

I have followed your website for several years, now. I always look forward to new entries especially new reviews and daily inspirations submitted by photographers all over the world.

I started photography 8 years ago and was primarily a Nikon user. Then, came the Fujifilm X100. I just fell in love with the design of that camera. It reminded me of my Dad’s Kodak Retinette. So, I pre-ordered it and read all the online previews and rumors. I kept on waiting, even after production halted in the Fujifilm factory in Sendai, Japan due to the devastating earthquake and tsunami. After almost a year of waiting, I finally received my order. I wanted to use the X100 as my travel camera, not just as my primary travel camera, but my only travel camera. Of course, I had to contend with the built-in lens. I thought having a single lens would be liberating (if you have a DSLR with multiple lenses, you know the mental anguish of choosing which lenses to bring, packing, etc.) I sold all my other Nikon DSLRs but one, and traveled with my little X100. I also put-up a group pool in Flickr called X100rumors for users of the X100 camera and its future variants. Yes, coming from DSLRs, the X100 was frustrating initially: back-focusing issues, useless manual focus, camera freezing up, etc. (all of which were vastly improved and solved by firmware updates). Still, instead of traveling with an entire system, I now travel with “a camera”. In the beginning, the limitation of having a single lens bothered me. Soon after, it became a personal challenge to obtain the best image I can with that single focal length.

Before I took photography as a hobby, I usually buy souvenirs from my travels. Now, traveling with a camera, I am more inspired to bring home photographs of a place – photographs that I could truly call my own. Before traveling to a particular place for the first time, I would Google images of that specific place – trying to see note-worthy attractions, what tourists usually photograph. Then, I would choose which attractions to photograph, and imagine how I would shoot it in a way that probably nobody has ever done before (or at least not shown in Google images, Flickr or 500px). I usually take note of the predicted sunrise, sunset and weather on each day during my travel. As you all know, aside from the Golden Hour, a lot of exquisite images can also be taken in the rain. The following images were taken by my little X100 throughout the years. They were all re-sized for this website in Lightroom.

This first image was taken when I first saw the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. I noticed that the other tourists had their cameras with zoom lenses and camera phones aimed only at the bridge. I soon spotted these array of coin-operated binoculars just in a corner, seemingly neglected – seating there while time and technology just whizzed by. They were probably fascinating and a novelty during their time, but now, just a relic. Yes, I was more enchanted by these shiny binoculars than the enormous man-made achievement that everybody flocked here for. I took a photograph of the binoculars, edited the image with Fujifilm’s free SilkyPix software and a free open-source software, Gimp. I ended up calling this piece, “The Old Robot”.

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Image number two: my girlfriend and I traveled to Chicago. I wanted to have a souvenir photograph of the “Cloud Gate” like everyone else who has been there. If you Google it, you would know that this piece of art has been photographed a million times. So, I decided to have our souvenirs by putting my X100 in a Tamrac Zip-shot tripod, attached an infrared filter and with a couple of Cokin neutral-density filters to the lens. I then set the camera on long-exposure. My girlfriend and I took turns photographing each other. The shots were very long exposures, so we would take a comfortable pose while the one photographing would continually wave his or her hand like a conductor in an orchestra – letting the other know that the shutter is still open and for not to move. The image was converted to black and white and edited in Lightroom.

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The third image is a photograph of the Smithsonian garden in Washington, DC using the same tripod and infrared filter. I was carefully composing my shot one afternoon, when a gentleman just sat down on the bench at middle of my frame and unmindfuly read the day’s newspaper. Irritation turned to inspiration when I started seeing the results on my X100’s LCD screen. To me, the resulting image just exuded leisure and relaxation. My office and I ended up gifting a framed print of it to a co-worker who recently retired.

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This photograph of the beach, was taken in Cancun, Mexico. I was initially drawn by the red color of the floaters. Up close, I was amused to see a beer bottle under the lifeguards’ tall chair. Looks like they had a little “refreshment” while at work. To me, the image says, “Chill out! You’re on vacation! You are not in the USA!”. This was edited in Lightroom.

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The fourth image was taken in Richmond, Virginia. While gazing up the monuments and buildings, it reminded me of the architecture in the Eastern Bloc during the cold-war era. So, I edited this image to have a utopian look in Lightroom.

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My foray into street photography is pretty limited. Unlike other photographers, it is hard for me to find something to photograph on the street, that to me, seems worth-while. Maybe, I don’t have an eye for real street photography, or maybe, because of my little experience with a film camera as a child, that I try not to waste a photograph unless I see a potential story in the picture. In my mind, I keep on judging a potential photograph as just a regular snapshot, or a potential story that is worth telling. In this case, my girlfriend and I were crossing the street in Chicago, after a late dinner. I saw this cyclist coming towards us. It was close to midnight, it was cold, it was raining and I thought, “Why is this guy out here on such a miserable night? Is he going home? Going to see his lady, perhaps?” Granted, he could just be a regular commuter but I can’t sometimes help making up crazy stories like these. So, without thinking, I just stopped in the middle of the street and took a photograph while the cyclist and all the cars are rushing towards me. All the while, my girlfriend is shouting at me to cross the street. Until this day, whenever I look at this image, I still wonder where this night cyclist was heading to. This image was edited in Gimp.

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Image seven is a photograph of the outdoor public market in my hometown in the Philippines. During some days of the week, there is a public outdoor market, and vendors are there as early as two in morning, preparing their wares and produce. I took this photograph around sunrise. Now, I don’t know any of these people. I was only walking around taking photographs. I like this particular photograph because when I took it, I was in the middle of the crowd. But as you can see, I was nothing but invisible to everybody. Everyone had their own stance, their own gaze – as if actors on a stage and only I, could notice the play unfolding. Almost like a Renaissance painting. Edited in Lightroom.

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This colorful image of lights was taken at Disney World. I took this hand-held with the X100. I was surprised when I opened this image on my computer because it already looked perfect, straight out of the camera. The X100 has a great low-light capability. I converted it in-camera from RAW to Velvia. I only increased contrast a very tiny bit in Gimp. But you are hard-pressed to tell the difference between the edited from the original.

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This next image of a crashing wave is when my X100 nearly got nearly got killed. I was in Pebble Beach in California. I was trying to take photographs of incoming waves with a small tripod. Because the X100 doesn’t have a zoom lens, you really have to keep the camera a little close to the water, the tripod was set low and and I was almost seating on the rocks. Anyway, while composing my shot, I noticed a rather large wave coming in. I was quickly debating if I should go back and save my camera, or hold my ground and maybe, will have a helluva of a shot. I decided to hold my ground. So, as soon as the wave came crashing in, I took a single frame then immediately, raised my camera with the tripod over my head. My shorts got wet, but that little gamble paid off. Image edited in SilkyPix.

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The last image was taken in Baltimore, Maryland during one summer. There were a bunch of kids playing and running around the fountain. Like in a playground, all these kids were all chasing each other and playing despite being practically strangers to each other, all but these two boys. I saw that they were in their own little world, brothers – probably twins. Somehow, it reminded me of my brother and I, during my own childhood. So, I edited this image in Lightroom in a way that invokes a sense of nostalgia.

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All these images were taken by my beloved Fujifilm X100. It was only more than a year ago, that I upgraded my computer that I was able to embrace Lightroom and Photoshop. For more than five years, I was using a free program called Gimp and also the SilkyPix software that came with my X100. To me, having the X100, limitation became inspiration. Could I have made these shots with a DSLR, given the chance? Most definitely. But I selected a particular tool and made full use of it. Even my choice of editing software is of no importance. Coming home from a travel, I usually personally judge my photographs if they are worth the ink and paper they will be printed on, if not, I usually not bother sharing them. Years ago, I would spend more on gadgets and lenses. Now, I’d rather spend on printing and framing and decorating the house.

Finally, I continually strive for the elusive “6-second photograph”. If a stranger is able to look at a photograph for six seconds or more the first time, then I would consider that as a very successful photograph. Have I tested that silly theory? No. But it’s a lifelong goal that keeps me on clicking.

I hope I can inspire all of you, especially to those who are just starting photography, that regardless of the camera that you have, regardless of the latest editing software, the most important thing is your own vision and the stories you can tell. Only after extensive use of your camera that you will develop your own style and personal inspiration in photography. Even in music, the student plays somebody else’s music in the beginning. Only when they feel comfortable and proficient with their own instrument, when they usually feel inspired making their own tunes. Gadgets, extra lenses and accessories are fun, but most of the time, they just distract you from your own imagination.

Now, with my X100, would I be upgrading? Maybe not anytime, soon. Now unless… Fuji comes up with a X100T in graphite silver? :)
Keep on clicking!

Jonas Luis

JonasLuis.com

Dec 182014
 

The Joy of Shooting Photos

By Dennie Mullete

My name is Dennie, I’m from Bandung, Indonesia. And sorry if my English not so good …

When the first time I found this site, I was searching for a pocket camera with good high ISO performance, and I found Steve reviewing the Olympus PEN E-PL1 … I so impress with the result, even Steve said that E-PL1 has a  really good jpeg engine that time and I was looking for a camera like this from the start… But I still did not know anything about aperture, bokeh, fastlens etc. I’m blind at that time, know nothing about photography. What I know is high ISO is needed when you want to take pictures without flash in low light, so I bought it …

Fast forward, now I have a Canon 6D that really help me when shot low light, and I keep telling myself I’m not a photographer, I’m just taking pictures :) … but I must say … sometimes … the joy, the fun, the mood, the inspiration is the main control about the picture I wanna take, that really takes effect to the result … coz I have the time when mood is down, no joy when shooting … I have 1 or 2 hundred frames but nothing to be keeping … that was a big hit for my photography experience … and I say … I would pick Olympus pen E-PL5 rather than my 6D … just because the joy … the fun to use … I’m not say about the IQ, I’m just saying about the “fun factor” that really take effect of the result … :)

Enough said. I hope u like my pictures and thank you Steve, you are really my Inspiration … for about 3 years now … and I am waiting for your Sony A7 mk II review. Cheers

It’s taken about 10 PM, really dark, at local restaurant, light source from the light garden, and the back is city of bandung, really nice place, the air a bit freezing, the place called “Balakecrakan”, sundanese language, mean “eat together-nes”, 35mm f2 @f2, ISO 12800, 1/60, develop from RAW

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Taken in my friend place, just hang out, and try snapshot with one source light, the hanging light on the middle room, so i tell my friend to dress like a mob … do u think it’s look like a mob ? :) 35mm f2 @f2, ISO 6400, 1/100, develop from RAW

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 “Bandung Caang”, sundaese, mean “Bandung Bright”, spend time with family, is something I must do, family … all the work I do, all my effort, is for my family, so what do the best beside hang out with family ? :) 85mm [email protected], ISO 3200, 1/160 Straight JPEG

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See my facebook https://www.facebook.com/denie.mullete

Dec 022014
 

Character Style and Mood in Photography Part 2 – Hints of Hidden Things

By Peter Maynard

See part 1 of Peters Report HERE.

Thank you all for your positive response to my first essay on character, style and mood in photography. As I edited that article it forced me to think about why I adopt the approach that I do to photography, so apart from anything else it was useful as a means of clarifying my own thinking on the subject. For those who read it you may recall I talked about my belief that we should each search for an approach to image making that reflects our own personality and preferred personal style. I also argued the merits of deliberately using mood and leaving something to the viewers’ imagination so they can interpret the image in their own way.

I had a number of images that I had considered using in the last article but did not in the end use due to considerations of length, so I thought I might as well prepare a part 2. Maybe it will help inspire others to try something different in their own photography. For those of you who have had a look at my Flickr site you may have seen that I have tagged photos “life in shadows”. This stems from my film shooting days when I was largely shooting monochrome. It seemed to me that much of photography was about representing life using shadows and light. Hence – “life in shadows.” I have headed this article “hints of hidden things” as it seems a little more relevant to the theme I have been writing about – the use of mood, the value of the power of suggestion and the idea that leaving some things to the viewers’ imagination can actually help improve an image. For those who have expressed interest in an article on post processing, I have not forgotten. Subject to Steve’s agreement, I will prepare an article for future publication. By the way I realize that by now some of you will have had a peek at my Flickr site so some of the following images may be familiar to you (if so, my apologies).

The first image is a favourite of mine although I am not sure why. However, I do know that what appeals to me has something to do with the presence in the image of the steeple of the old clock tower. Other than this it is nothing more than a jumble of buildings reflected in the window of another building. I suppose it does suggest something about the nature of change and progress or perhaps about the permanence of some aspects of the past. And of course it says something to me about my home town.

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Some images appeal to me just because of the patterns that they contain. I have to admit that I love abstract photos. The following two are examples of pure abstracts. The first is an abstract take on a building reflected in the window of another building. What makes it in my view, is the distortion that the reflected image is given by the slight misalignment of the panes of glass and the subtle colors.

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The second of these demonstrates why sometimes you just have to be thankful for the opportunities thrown up unexpectedly when you have a camera in your hand. If you look closely this image is nothing more than an office shot through a window. But with a boost to contrast in post processing and a little added glow, it becomes something that reminds me of an abstract painting by a modern artist like a Kandinski or a Miro (all those lines and blocks of colour). To be honest it may not appeal to everyone but I just liked exactly that – the lines and angles together with the colours. I guess the message is always have a camera with you if you are serious about photography. I know I feel naked without one.

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While on the theme of making the best of opportunities that present themselves, the National Gallery of Victoria in Australia has a water wall the front of the building – a wall of glass with water perpetually flowing down it. It’s a gift to photographers like me who love images that give a slight twist to reality. I especially like the following image for the relationship between the people in the photo as well as for the two eye-catching splashes of red. You just can’t plan these things – but you can anticipate them. I knew this would be a good spot for photos and so I hung out on an interior mezzanine floor overlooking the wall for perhaps an hour while snapping the occasional shot as images presented themselves. I knew that sooner or later something would turn up.

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And this image made in the same place on the same day seems to work too, although it is very spare in terms of its content. Once more, a splash of red works to heighten interest.

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With one exception, the following six shots are all similar to many of those used in the last article – people in one of my favourite settings – enjoying themselves with friends over a coffee or a meal. (Hint, if you are nervous about street photography it is easy to get natural and engaging photographs of people when they are concentrating on their friends or food). To a greater or lesser extent they all demonstrate the ideas I talked about in that article, especially the ideas of deliberately using blur, distortion and shadow to create mood and to encourage viewers to make their own interpretations of the images. All of these have involved some post processing (mainly cropping, tone, colour etc.) to bring them to their final state, but to a large extent what you see is what I saw (i.e. I have not set out to create something new – just enhance what was already there).

The third image in the series is well out of focus. Here is another hint. If something goes wrong, do not be too quick to delete photos that have not turned out (which often happens when shooting candidly in streets). I was using autofocus, which I think focussed on the reflections, not on the main subjects. Kismet! For some reason this worked better than it might have had I focussed correctly. I often find it is possible to come back, perhaps months later, to photos that I initially rejected and find something interesting in them. This was one of those.

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I will end this article with one final photo which is an example demonstrating what can be done with a more extreme approach to post processing if you are of a mind to do so. This image was actually taken on an aircraft when flying off to an overseas holiday a few years ago. I thought the photo was quite good, helped by the quirky pose of the subject, but the setting was boring. At a loss to what else to do with it and as an experiment, I tweaked the colour (lowering saturation), the tone (increasing contrast and adding a vignette), the sharpness (adding some blur and glow) and also added a semi-transparent texture overlay for no better reason than I was interested to see what I could make of an image that I thought to be good but which had a background which intruded. Although you would never know it, the halo like glow is light entering through the plane’s window.

I full well realise that some think this amount of post processing is “cheating” in some way, but my view has always been that particularly in this age of digital imaging, image making is about the end result – not how you get there and so as long as you are honest about it that’s OK. Besides in this case it is a way of using a photo that otherwise may not have been a keeper. It is another example of how you can take a more or less boring image and then add elements to invest it with a character that has more interest. I will pick up on this theme in a future article in which I will provide a few suggestions and examples of how to improve basic images by post processing that takes you beyond the usual processing that involves little more than reducing digital noise, sharpening etc.

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If you feel so inclined, please visit my Flickr site.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/life_in_shadows/

Or you can visit some I have placed on Pinterest for a more succinct overview of some of my images.

http://www.pinterest.com/peterm1001/

Nov 052014
 

rx1r

My RX1r Experience

by R.A. Krajnyak

Hi Steve and Brandon.

First, let me start off with thanks to you both for the great site and the work you put into it. Your site is an integral part of my daily web surfing routine and your insight, Steve, has been influential in my development as a photographer.

Secondly, let me thank you for turning me on to the I Shot It website. I was honored to be among the first nine runner-ups who receive their $20 entry fee back in the most recent B&W contest and was awarded a Mark of Excellence for the following photograph taken with my Sony RX1r:

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Lastly, I wanted to share my RX1r experience with you and your readers along with some images taken with this incredible camera. Anyone who is interested in viewing the images in this post at greater resolution can view them on my website in a gallery specifically set up with just these images. The smaller resolution here just doesn’t do this camera justice. The gallery is located here: http://www.quintaquad.com/Steve-Huff-Blog/n-dwFzN/

A bit of background on me. I’m 60 years old and have been involved with photography off and on for 40 years. My first good cameras were Nikon film SLR’s (Fm & Fe2). However my interest waned and they soon saw little use.

When digital came along I got the D40 and then the D5100. Like many enthusiasts, I ended up rarely taking my camera out due to the size and weight. About 1 1/2 years ago a friend of mine turned me on to the Sony RX100. I was blown away by the size and IQ along with the ability to shoot RAW. I began taking my camera everywhere and photographing everything. This piqued my interest in upgrading to a small interchangeable lens system.

I started researching on-line and discovered the M4/3 cameras as well as your site. I loved the size and IQ of the system and ended up with a Panny GX7. In addition, I have since added an Oly E-M10 which I love. I also discovered the Sony RX1 and was intrigued by it. However the price was out of my range.

Last October I received an unexpected small inheritance and decided to splurge on an RX1 or RX1r. I wasn’t sure which one but after researching further I decided on the RX1r. Your reviews were very influential in my decision. A year later I can truly say that I’m thrilled with my choice.

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The RX1r is in my mind a true classic…a small powerhouse FF camera with a fast, high quality 35mm Zeiss lens that is designed specifically for the sensor. The rendering of the Zeiss lens is gorgeous. You have aptly described it as “creamy” and I heartily agree. I’m not a pixel-peeping tech kind of guy nor am I into debating the quality of bokeh…I just know what I like and the RX1r definitely floats my boat when it comes to size, weight and IQ.

I added a few accessories that for me are essential…optional Sony EVF, Gordy leather wrist strap, Fotodiox grip and Fotodiox lens hood.

I shoot in manual mode but primarily use auto focus. Control layout is minimal and fairly well laid out. That being said I do have a few small niggles with the camera. AF could be better, I would prefer an EVF built into the body like the A7 series and I would like an articulated LCD. There is also a bit of a CA issue in high contrast situations such as foliage against a bright sky.

DR and low light high ISO is excellent (the David Grissom band image and my self-portrait were both shot hand-held at 3200).The quality of the noise is very pleasing and grain-like IMHO. I shoot strictly RAW so I can’t comment on JPEGs. The image detail is outstanding as is the RAW conversion out of camera color and contrast, although the last two things aren’t as important to me as I do extensive post work on the RAWs.

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The RAW files are extremely malleable which is important to me since post work is a major part of the overall photography experience for me personally and this is where the magic happens with this camera. I’ve been working with Photoshop since 1996 and have incorporated Lightroom along with Topaz, Nik and On One plug-ins as well. The RX1r files stand up beautifully under heavy processing. I love both B&W and color as you can tell from my photos. I’m not above doing extensive processing but I love a simple B&W image too. I just love all the different aspects and styles of photography in general. Due to my eclectic tastes I don’t focus on one specific genre…possibly to the detriment of developing my own signature style.

Many people think of the RX1/r as limiting because of the fixed 35mm lens. Not so in my experience. I find the RX1r to be fantastic for all kinds of photography in general from landscapes to macro. Granted it’s not useful for sports or birding but those are genres of photography that require fairly specific equipment in the form of long lenses. In addition to its versatility the RX1r is inconspicuous and quiet. I tried to select a wide range of photos to showcase what I think is the RX1r’s versatility.

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My favorite subject is my 90 year old mother who suffers from dementia in the form of severe short term memory loss and lives with me. We go walking every afternoon on the local nature trails and afterwards stop at the local coffee shop for hot chocolate or coffee. I always take my camera with me and document our walks. Although I only included three images with her as the subject (the portrait of her, the image of her in the straw hat from behind and the image of her hand on the gear cog) you can find many photos of her at my website, particularly in the two galleries, The Memories Of Margaret V. and A Walk Through The Seasons: Portraits In Dementia.

The first is highly processed, conceptual composite images while the latter is simple B&W photos. Both are photo essays meant to be viewed as an whole rather than as individual images. Note that not all the images from those were taken with the RX1r. The Memories gallery also contains a video of the images with an accompanying music track which was written, played and recorded by me as well. Unfortunately the image quality isn’t that great due to SmugMug’s video size restrictions.

I’ll end by saying I enjoyed your recent article about what you’ve learned from street photography. I had to laugh when I read the line about photographing what you love even if it’s flowers, trees and leaves. Those are three of my favorite subjects, in particular leaves. But the advice rings true…photograph what you love and forget about what others think. That’s not to say you should ignore criticism. On the contrary, constructive criticism is how we learn and improve at our craft. But take criticism with a grain of salt and stay true to yourself, not worrying about what others think. Never hesitate to take chances and stretch yourself in order to grow.

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Thanks again for all you do for photography and for the opportunity to share about the hobby and camera I love.

R.A. Krajnyak AKA QuintaQuad

quintaquad.com

Sep 182014
 

Five Weddings, Five Cameras, Five Images

Steve and Brandon, like so many others who visit your website, I want to thank you for providing a rich source of information for all of us who appreciate straight-forward, real-world reviews and insights about photography. You do a great job, and I appreciate all of your hard work to make such a wonderful website work so well.

My photography life was so much easier back in the days when I shot film. I had my Nikon F2 and Nikon FM, later to be replaced by an F4 and an FE. That was it. Three primes, two always on camera, and I was ready to go. No muss and no fuss. But, digital came along, I got older, and GAS crept into my life. I eventually wound up with five digital cameras (after buying and selling others!), and though I’ve wanted to thin the herd, I enjoy all of them and didn’t know which, if any, I could let go of to simplify my photography life a bit more.

Then, it happened. INSPIRATION! My wife and I got invited to five weddings over a seven weekend period this spring. Five weddings, all located here in North Carolina, but scattered throughout the state. I knew that each wedding would have a pro dutifully documenting each event, and many guests would have point-and-shoots, phones with cameras, and a few DSLRs. Everybody is a photographer, right?

What an opportunity for me! I had no obligation to capture the events. I had no responsibility at all other than to be there, be generous with gifts, and have a great time. So, I decided that I’d be selfish and take photos for myself and not be concerned with capturing images for the wedding couples or their families, despite the fact that each family knows of my passion for photography…the guy who takes a camera everywhere he goes. And besides, maybe I’d get a better feel for which of my cameras I should sell.

This was the plan. Having these five cameras and there being five weddings, I decided to use one and only one camera for each wedding. My goal was to create one shot from each wedding that I was really happy with. Of course, I took more than one shot at each wedding, but I didn’t take all that many. Remember, there was the professional and all those other folks with their image makers already doing that. Each of my five images was to be very different in content and rendition. I didn’t care what the subject was. All that mattered was that the shot had to be taken at the wedding. All shots would be taken in raw, and I would use Lightroom however I wanted to create my final versions. I wrote the names of my five cameras on pieces of paper, put them in a hat, and selected one piece of paper at a time for weddings 1 – 5. I was inspired!

For the first wedding, I shot my versatile Olympus EM-1 with 12-40mm lens. It’s ironic that my wedding one image turned out to be of the newly-married couple driving off to their honeymoon. One would think that that shot would be best if it was from the fifth wedding. But, this is not a photo essay. As for this image, I found it interesting that as I shot the sequence of the couple pulling away in the car, the two pros were fumbling with lenses and missed the entire thing. The newlyweds loves this shot. ;-)

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For the second wedding, I made a grave mistake! I brought my SONY RX1 with a low battery level. When the SONY went dead, I reached into my pocket for my backup battery only to discover that it was a battery for my Olympus. Don’t make this same mistake kids. Fortunately, I had already taken a few shots that I thought would be good candidates for my project. This one catches the mood and landscape for me, as we all relaxed after the wedding. There is something both formal and informal going on here.

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I brought my Leica M-E and 50mm Zeiss Planar lens for the third wedding. I have a love-hate relationship with the Leica. I love the files…love…love…love…, but my aging eyes really don’t like manual focusing all that much anymore. More about this later. The image? Well, you can’t tell from my photo, but the young bride was wearing her great-grandmother’s wedding dress. Wow! I decided that I wanted a “vintage” feel to the image, but to also include the modernity of the moment, a young woman in her 20s getting married. Thus, the tattoo emphasized along with the vintage rendition.

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I would have preferred to stay with smaller cameras for each wedding, but my Nikon Df came up on the fourth pull out of the hat. I didn’t want to be all that conspicuous with a camera, so I stuck with my 50mm kit lens with no hood rather than my 24-120mm lens. Not a small package, but not all that large either. The outdoor location for the wedding was the North Carolina mountains, west of Asheville, and I just couldn’t resist the shot, even though it doesn’t have “wedding” written on it. Hey, it’s my project, right?

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The final wedding. The final camera. The final shot. I took my trusty SONY RX100 M2 for this one. I love this little camera. However, another SNAFU, but not with the camera, exactly. The wedding was to be taken outside near the water, but a storm was threatening and at the last minute, chairs were set up in the reception area inside the country club. It was dark (Where’s my Df when I need it?), cramped, and a lot of light was coming through those windows backlighting the couple. Nevertheless, I got this shot. With a lot of help in Lightroom and Silver Efex Pro, I created an image to my liking.

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Five…Five…and Five. DONE!

I’m not a great photographer, I just know what I like. I was moaning about having too many cameras when a situation presented itself that inspired me to do a photo project. I had a great time with it and learned some new things from each of the wedding experiences, some while shooting, some while working in Lightroom. Now, I look for everyday situations to inspire me further. I love it.

As for the five cameras, all served me well. I did sell the ME…but I ordered a Leica T!

Wedding anyone?

Thanks, Brandon and Steve!

Fran DeRespinis

Aug 252014
 

Dear Steve,

Father’s Day just recently passed in Brazil. As past year I’m writing to you on this date, and as past year I’m sending to you a few pictures of my inspiration, my precious daughter. I realized that I never had sent pictures in color to you. Just because I don’t get so many that way — a good composition in color is harder to do, at least for me. So this time may I share some few, in color.

Dear Brandon,
Be proud of your dad I’m absolutely sure he’s proud of you — working so close to him, and following his steps — it’s a dream for any father that comes true.

Dear Both,
If you do will it would be a pleasure to see these few posted like an inspiration that might inspire. I’ll be glad and proud, she either.

My best wishes, in color. And happy father’s day,

Luiz Paulo

PS > Don’t know if this is important (the exif data) — I keep shooting with my old M9, and keep enjoying it…

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Jul 172014
 

Photographing 100 Strangers with Fuji

By Justin Holder

Steve,

Earlier in the year, I started what seemed like a mountain of a project, planning to meet 100 strangers over the next years, interviewing them and compiling them into a book for my two sons. The project is called “Advice For My Boys” and has ended up being not overwhelming, but an incredible journey.

Just last Friday, a couple of days before Father’s Day, I had already hit my 100th stranger since mid February.

I have a Canon 5DMKII and a host of L-lenses, but I knew that would add an intimidation factor, beyond what there would already be. So, I shot the entire project with my Fuji X100s, Fuji X-E1 and then the Fuji X-T1. As many of the other Fuji fans know, these cameras offer such incredible results, yet seem so cosmetically casual and unassuming. I could not be more pleased with the results.

Now, over 100 deep in the project, I have decided to keep going. I always ask my strangers initially three questions: happiest time of your life, toughest time of your life, one piece of advice for my boys. Amazingly, not ONE person has said no to the project.

Even more cool has been the ripple effect of it. One of my favorites, Lois, who worked at McDonald’s said, as we were sitting down to talk, “you know, this is the first time in my life I’ve ever been noticed.” I asked what she meant. “Oh, I’m just one of those people who goes through life and you don’t really notice if I’m there or not.” The next day, lots of readers of the project showed up at her McDonald’s with cards, notes, little gifts, etc. Even the president of the bank went over to see her. She emailed me that evening and said it was the best day of her life. There have been so many similar stories in this project…and I feel certain there’s not one stranger I’ve met by chance.

We’re all fans of Steve’s site because we love cameras and photography, but even more the opportunities and experiences they often allow. If you’ve been considering doing something out of the box, I’d urge you to make the leap. Yes, it’s intimidating, but the rewards greatly outweigh the risk. Cheers to all of you!

Website for the project: www.AdviceForMyBoys.com

Nashville NBC affiliate news story

Thanks, Steve!

Justin

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