Jul 312015
 

Film Friday: Death Valley 1987

by Dierk Topp

In 1987 I spent 3 months on an assignment in San Francisco, CA. At that time the Kodak T-MAX was announced and Kodak said: The world’s finest grained 100-speed black-and-white film.

To be sure I took many roles of film with me. On a weekend trip I took many shots in the Death Valley with my Nikon FA and good prime Nikkor lenses, polarizer, tripod and mirror lock up to make sure, to get the best possible results.

Of course I had no lab with me and gave the film to a professional lab for development.

But:

When I got the developed film back, I was very disappointed. I could see the grain and dirt with the naked eye! It looked more like ISO 800 or even higher to me.

What I was told and did not know: Kodak tested new products abroad to avoid any problems in the USA.  When I asked the lab, they told me, they did not know the film and developed the film in their “normal soup” !!

Find the result below. It is about the best, I could get.

analog: Death Valey 1987, T-Max 100, Nikon FA

analog: Death Valey 1987, T-Max 100, Nikon FA

analog: Death Valey 1987, T-Max 100, Nikon FA

wrong developement of the T-MAX in the lab reulting in severe grain

wrong developement of the T-MAX in the lab reulting in severe grain

analog: Death Valey 1987, T-Max 100, Nikon FA

wrong developement of the T-MAX in the lab reulting in severe grain

analog: Death Valey 1987, T-Max 100, Nikon FA

wrong developement of the T-MAX in the lab reulting in severe grain

analog: Death Valey 1987, T-Max 100, Nikon FA

analog: Death Valey 1987, T-Max 100, Nikon FA

analog: Death Valey 1987, T-Max 100, Nikon FA

wrong developement of the T-MAX in the lab reulting in severe grain

wrong developement of the T-MAX in the lab reulting in severe grain

wrong developement of the T-MAX in the lab reulting in severe grain

wrong developement of the T-MAX in the lab reulting in severe grain

wrong developement of the T-MAX in the lab reulting in severe grain

More of this series in my flickr album “Death Valley 1987, T-Max 100, Nikon SLR”

I digitized the negatives with a Sony A7R, bellows with enlarger lens and flash. Processing with Lightroom 5.

Dierk Topp

Jul 302015
 

My First Impressions – Zeiss Batis 25/2

By Bob Israel

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Getting a new lens is always exciting. You read the reviews (including Steve’s), you ponder whether your excitement is from the hype from the previews of others. You ponder whether this is really a ‘need to have’ vs. ‘want to have’ lens. Finally, you make the decision and place your preorder. Then you wait . . . and read some more . . . and wait some more . . . and see some images . . . and wait . . . and then . . . it arrives.

First, it’s the unboxing, not like you see on you tube videos but the anticipation of holding the lens in your own hands for the very first time. Today I received the Zeiss Batis 25mm f/2 Distagon. I’ve had a love affair with Zeiss for a long time shooting contax C/Y, Zeiss ZE and ZM lenses. But the Batis 25/2 is the first I’ve owned that will autofocus on the Sony A7 series. To say I was looking forward to this day is an understatement.

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The lens is a thing of beauty. It has a modern look and feel and the OLED display just seems cool (yes, I’m a techie). The lens is much lighter in weight than I expected but it feels perfect on my A7II. I went out at lunch today and took a few shots. Nothing earth shattering but an assortment of wide open, closed down and into the sun variety.

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Then I looked at the images on my laptop. I got the same feeling and excitement as when I first shot with the Zeiss ZE line. It was an OMG moment. The colors are rich and the lens is sharp even wide open. The lens is marvelous when shooting into the sun. OK, I realize I’ve only taken about 40 images, but so far, it’s an instant love affair with Zeiss . . . all over again.

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-Bob Israel

Bob Israel
RJI Photography

http://www.rjiphotography.com
http://​w​ww.facebook.com/rjiphotography​
http://www.flickr.com/photos/rjiphotography

See Steve’s full review of the Batis 25 and 85 HERE

Jul 292015
 

Reader Quick Shot: Olympus E-M10 and 12mm f/2

by Frederic Vasquez

(From Steve: This “Quick Shot” will be a new series much like the daily inspiration but with ONE SHOT only. If you have ONE SHOT that you absolutely love, send it to me with a description of the shot, what you used to take the image and why you like it. I may post it as a “Quick Shot”! Send to me at [email protected])

For your consideration, here is one shot from my 72 hour in Tokyo. Shot in Shinjuku station with an Olympus E-M10 and the 12mm f2 lens. Thanks you Steve for the website as I have enjoyed it for many years now. All the best from Scotland.

Frederic Vasquez

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Jul 242015
 
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Olympus EM1 + Sony A7s – Still my favorite Combo!

By Neil Buchan-Grant

Hi Steve

I thought I’d share some new images with your readers. I’m still loving the Olympus EM1 and Sony A7s although I have to say, since the Olympus 40-150mm zoom and the new 7-14mm zoom came out, the Oly has had more use. I also recently bought the Oly MC-14 1.4x tele converter for the big zoom and for me its performance in terms of resolution and sharpness underlines the big range now offered by the Olympus system. These 3 PRO zooms give me pretty much all I need for general travel work and the 12-40mm has all but replaced my wide primes with no loss of image quality. I still only tend to get the A7s + Leica M 35mm or 50mm f1.4 Summilux’s out when I’m out at night or I’m shooting low light work but with these lenses it still offers something a bit special.

My friend a few weeks before giving birth – EM1 – 12-40mm 2.8 PRO @ 25mm – available light and off camera flash

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My friend and her baby girl who had just had another lifesaving operation only days after her birth – Sony A7s Leica M 50mm 1.4 – mixed available light

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My friend holding it together by reading Winnie the Pooh to her baby girl who was still gravely ill only one week after her birth – Sony A7s – Leica M 35mm 1.4 – mixed available light

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My work here is a mixture of commissions and personal shots ranging from an architecture job in Oxfordshire, corporate portraits and a trip to Wimbledon tennis championships to some intimate portraits of my friend Scarlet and her baby, Frida. The baby had a traumatic and complicated birth and had to be resuscitated several times in her first few days. Thankfully she’s doing brilliantly now and is thriving! Thanks again for the opportunity to share these with your readers and keep up the great work! If anyone is interested, I have a new, short program of workshops on my website here:

My friend and her baby Frida who was finally out of harms way and seemed to be enjoying her new world – EM1 – Leica DG 25mm 1.4 – window light

 

 

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Frida just a few days ago, now 2 months old and currently my favorite model! – EM1 Leica DG 25mm 1.4 – window light

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The Prado Museum in Madrid during a quick break – EM1 12-40mm 2.8 PRO @ 15mm

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A late night bar in Madrid – Sony A7s Leica M 35mm 1.4 – available light

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A studio portrait of the actress Hetty Baynes Russell, who was married to Ken Russell the British film director. – EM1 12-40mm 2.8 PRO – continuous light through 4ft softbox

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Another shot of Hetty – Sony A7s Leica M 50mm 1.4 – window light

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A photograph of a rather special Barn design in Oxforshire at dusk – my friends Arthur and Kate were the architects who designed it – EM1 7-14mm 2.8 PRO @ 7mm

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The same building during the day – EM1 7-14mm 2.8 PRO @ 7mm

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A model in Prague – EM1 Leica DG 25mm 1.4 – window light and reflector

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A corporate shoot in London – EM1 12-40mm 2.8 PRO – Off camera flash

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Self portrait in the studio – EM1 12-40mm 2.8 PRO @ 35mm – continuous light through a 4 ft softbox and reflector

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Britain’s number one female tennis player Heather Watson winning her match at Wimbledon – EM1 40-150mm 2.8 PRO with MC-14 @ 420mm (effective length) wide open at f4

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Another self portrait in my garden – EM1 7-14mm 2.8 PRO @ 10mm – available light and off camera flash

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A tree surgeon working behind my garden – EM1 40-150mm 2.8 PRO + MC-14 @ 420mm (effective length) wide open at f4

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The same shot as above from the same spot, the tree surgeon is just visible – EM1 7-14mm 2.8 PRO @ 7mm

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http://buchangrant.format.com/workshops where you can join me in Berlin, India or China/Tibet over the next 10 months!

Jul 212015
 

UPDATED: Light Painting ONE DAY Workshop in AZ Ghost Town, HALF SOLD OUT!

Sign UP HERE!!

Hey guys!

Just wanted to update you on what will be a hell of a night out in the Arizona desert as we shoot an old abandoned ghost town while learning all about light painting!

Join me and my good friend Alex McClure (who is an Olympus Trailblazer) as well as others as we head out an hour or so from Phoenix to a location Alex scouted out and found. Old buildings, ruins, and more await us and we will set up our gear, tripods and have sandwiches and soft drinks on hand as we experiment with steel wool spinning, all kinds of light effects and yes, traditional light painting.

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This is a one night only workshop, as in, a few hours starting at 5PM on September 19th 2015. We will shoot in to the night and darkness and will come away with some new knowledge of light painting and fantastic photos. I have shot with Alex a few times and he knows his stuff when it comes to this, so will be a blast to get out with a group and shoot. I will have my Olympus and Sony cameras, Alex will have his Olympus gear and even new Olympus goodies to show. You can bring any DSLR or Mirrorless camera as all can be used for light painting.

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If you are interested the cost is only $100 for this awesome night of shooting the night. We will include sandwiches and drinks and we will carpool to the location with Alex bringing a few and myself bringing a few and maybe 1-2 others driving behind us.

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If you are local or near to Phoenix AZ, then you will NOT want to miss this! Will be a blast.

To sign up or read more, click on over to the official meetup page for it where you can learn more or sign up and pay to lock in your spot. Only 6 of the 12 seats remain! The 1st six sold in a few days, so I expect this to sell out soon.

SEE MORE OR SIGN UP HERE!!

 

Jul 212015
 

Hey Steve and Brandon.

My Fuji X100T has just arrived, and I thought I’d share some of the pictures from my first morning walk. I decided to go to a spot I know well. I mean it’s hard enough to get to know a camera for the first time, if you add to that a location you don’t know… well you get the picture!

This is big! At least for me. I have alway loved street photography, but never had the nerve to go out and take pictures of random people in the street. And since my main camera is a Canon 7D, It’s kinda hard to be unnoticed when that damn shutter claps away!! I mean, It’s called “Cannon” wright?!

Well, I guess there’s a first time for everything, and this was my first time shooting street action. And, let me tell you, I couldn’t be more pleased with it; both the performance from the Fuji X100T and the resulting images. Some say “Well it’s ok and everything, but ist’s no full frame!” to what I respond “Sure it’s not, but I’m not getting payed for my images (I’m not a professional photographer) ; and even if I was, an APS-C Type sensor is more than capable of producing great images.You don’t need full frame for that!”

Others gasp “It’s only 16 megapixels, wright?!”; what leads to a sligtly grumpy response from my part “Why would I need more? I don’t print mural nor building sized photos! I rarely print photos, which I regret; and when I do the biggest prints are 8×10. So I guess 16 megapixels is more than enough. Not to mention the storage space it saves me!”. Oh and don’t get me started on that whole lightroom RAW development “issue”. I know that, probably, there are other softwares that might be “better” at developing Fuj RAW files. And that if you sharpen the crap out of your images in Lightroom you might get the watercolor effect. Honestly, I didn’t notice it when I developed my pictures with this camera. Then again, I’m not looking at my files at 200%!! Just kidding, or maybe not !-)

No really; I know It’s not perfect. Although I love the X100T, I’m not blind to all it’s flaws. But like all good partnerships, It doesn’t come without it’s quirks. I’ll just have to know, what and where they are so I can deal with them.

All in all, It’s just a fun camera to shoot. At least for me!! But enough talking, here are a few shots from my walk.

 

 A father and a son, turn as they hear a helicopter flyby. The kid, of course, stares at the boats; while the father searches for the helicopter.

unnamed-13

Keep in mind, this place is full of people wlaking and running. But somehow, this guy just seemed slightly off. I don’t know why but, Johnny Walker comes to mind!
unnamed-14
This lady had a very gracious walk, she could have been Grace Kelly’s long lost sister. Not that she had one!
unnamed-15
Thaks guys, and keep up the good work.
Bye for now.
João Vieira
Jul 202015
 

New Panasonic GX8 is coming! Pre-Orders Up!

Pre-Order the GX8 at B&H Photo or Amazon HERE!

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The new Panasonic GX8, which appears to have taken some ideas from the Olympus E-M5 Mark II (swivel screen being one of them) and some unique and one of a kind features from Panasonic (swivel up EVF) and turned it into what appears to be the best Panasonic Mirrorless to date for those who love the GX style as opposed to the GH style of body. 4K video, tillable EVF, swivel out LCD, and more are all packed inside this new GX8. The previous GX7 was a fantastic little camera, and I reviewed it HERE.

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I have the Olympus E-M5 II Titanium Edition here and think it is a stunner. Would I like the GX8 better? No idea as I have not touched one yet but I hope to soon but would be tough for me to part with the amazing 5 Axis IS in the Olympus as I use it mainly for video, and it’s amazing. Just as with the Olympus, the GX8 allows you to swivel out the LCD to the left and close it up to where we do not even see the LCD, which I like and shoot often with the E-M5 II.

I like the dial based AF selection here as well as the simplistic layout. Could be a great street or every day camera. At $1200 for the body only, it is a bit steep but I shall soon see if it is worth the cost. Keep an eye out for a review SOON!

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The GX8 Specs (from B&H Photo HERE)

Pairing 4K recording and an updated Micro Four Thirds sensor, the black Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 is a sleek, compact mirrorless camera enabling versatile, multimedia recording. Utilizing a high resolution 20.3 MP Digital Live MOS sensor, along with a Venus Engine image processor, the GX8 is able to record 4K UHD movies at 30 or 24 fps; record full-resolution stills at 10 fps with AF-S or 8 MP stills at 30 fps; and work in difficult lighting situations with a top sensitivity of ISO 25600. Complementing the imaging capabilities is a unique Dual I.S. system that offers the use of both in-camera and in-lens image stabilization systems to effectively minimize the appearance of camera shake. The body design is also characterized by a durable, magnesium alloy construction that incorporates a tilting 2.36m-dot OLED electronic viewfinder and a free angle 3.0″ 1.04m-dot rear OLED touchscreen to suit working from a variety of angles. Offering an enhanced set of imaging features with a comfortable form factor, the GX8 is an everyday camera designed with advanced multimedia capture in mind.

Among other features, the GX8 also features built-in Wi-Fi with NFC to enable seamless wireless image transfer and remote camera control from linked smartphones or tablets. Benefitting both stills and movies, Panasonic’s DFD (Depth-From-Defocus) AF system helps to quicken focusing speeds while a Starlight AF feature maintains focusing accuracy in low-light down to -4 EV and manual focus is accented by focus peaking and Touch AF controls.

20.3 MP Digital Live MOS Sensor and Venus Engine
An updated 20.3 MP Digital Live MOS Micro Four Thirds sensor pairs with the Venus Engine image processor to deliver fast overall performance, a wider dynamic range, with notable image quality to suit working in a wide variety of conditions. Sensitivity ranges from ISO 200 to 25600, with the ability to extend down to ISO 100 for working in bright conditions or with longer shutter speeds. Versatile burst shooting modes also allow you to pair high continuous shooting rates with single-shot or continuous autofocus. Using the mechanical focal plane shutter, you can shoot up to 8 fps with AF-S, 6 fps with AF-C, and 5.5 fps during live view with AF-S. For even faster performance, up to 10 fps shooting is possible with the electronic shutter function or 30 fps at 8 MP using the 4K Photo Modes.
4K UHD Video Recording
In addition to the versatile still shooting modes, the GX8 also supports recording 4K UHD (3840 x 2160) video with either 30p or 24p frames rates at 100 Mbps in the MP4 format. Full HD 1080p/60 is also supported, in both MP4 and AVCHD formats, as well as HD and SD resolutions.

A built-in stereo microphone can be used during recordings, and features an integrated wind-cut filter, or an optional external microphone can be utilized via the 2.5mm jack for even clearer sound.

4K Photo Modes
Utilizing the 4K video recording capabilities, a trio of still shooting modes are available for recording continuous 8 MP stills at a 30 fps shooting rate:

4K Burst: Just as with video recording, this mode will allow you to continuously record 8 MP images at 30 fps for up to 29 min. 59 sec., making it ideal for instances where you need a fast frame rate in order to capture the best moment.

4K Pre-Burst: This mode is ideal for times when you’re unsure of the critical moment to press the shutter button and will record 8 MP images at 30 fps one second prior to and one second after pressing the shutter button in order to give you 60 frames to choose from.

4K Burst (S/S): This mode most closely follows the 4K video recording process, and allows you to playback your video, pause at the chosen moment, and use the shutter button to mark a chosen frame from the video and save it as a single 8 MP frame.

Dual Image Stabilization

Helping to achieve the utmost sharpness when photographing handheld, Dual I.S. combines the GX8’s sensor-shift image stabilization technology with lens-based image stabilization to compensate for a broader range of movement types to render sharper, clearer imagery. Dual I.S. requires the use of compatible Lumix lenses featuring O.I.S.
Body Design and Built-In Wi-Fi

A large OLED Live View Finder features a unique tilting design to benefit working from low angles and also has an impressive 2.36m-dot resolution, 0.77x magnification, and 10,000:1 contrast ratio.
A larger means for image composition and playback, the 3.0″ 1.04m-dot rear OLED monitor has a free angle, tilt and swivel design to support viewing from a variety of angles. It is also a touchscreen, which permits intuitive menu navigation and settings control.

Constructed from magnesium alloy with die-cast front and rear frames, the GX8 features a durable design that also incorporates extensive sealing at each joint, dial, and button to render it both splash- and dust-proof.

The sleek flat-body profile incorporates both front and rear dials for intuitive control over aperture and shutter speed settings. Eight assignable function buttons are also available, as well as a dedicated exposure compensation dial.

Built-in Wi-Fi connectivity with NFC allows for wireless image sharing and remote camera control from linked smartphones and tablets.

Depth-From-Defocus and Starlight AF Technologies

For accelerated autofocus performance, DFD (Depth-From-Defocus) technology is employed to quickly calculate the distance to subjects and adjust the focusing position in as little as 0.07 seconds, which enables continuous shooting up to 6 fps with continuous AF. This contrast-detection type focus method benefits both still and video recording modes, as well as subject tracking applications where subject color, size, and motion vectors are used to intelligently lock-onto the moving subjects and ensure precise focus. Additionally, supporting working in low-light conditions, a Starlight AF feature enables accurate AF performance down to -4 EV.

Benefitting manual focus operation, focus peaking is available that highlights bright edges of contrast with a colored outline for quickly recognizing your focus point, as well as Touch MF Assist for touch-to-focus operation.

Other Camera Features

A mechanical focal plane shutter enables a fast maximum shutter speed of 1/8000 sec., as well as a top flash sync speed of 1/250 sec. An electronic shutter function also avails a top shutter speed of 1/16,000 sec. to better enable working in bright conditions and with wider aperture settings.
More than 100 consecutive full-resolution JPG files can be captured in a burst, or approximately 30 consecutive raw files in a single burst.
Raw image files can be processed in-camera for a more streamlined post-production workflow.
Depending on the lens in use, the included DMW-BLC12 battery provides approximately 330 shots per charge when using the rear monitor, or 310 with the electronic viewfinder.
Photo Style modes: Standard, Vivid, Natural, Monochrome, Scenery, Portrait, Custom, Cinelike D, and Cinelike V.
Creative Control modes: Expressive, Retro, Old Days, High Key, Low Key, Sepia, Monochrome, Dynamic Monochrome, Rough Monochrome, Silky Monochrome, Impressive Art, High Dynamic, Cross Process, Toy Effect, Toy Pop, Bleach Bypass, Miniature Effect, Soft Focus, Fantasy, Star Filter, One Point Color, and Sunshine.

Jul 202015
 
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Getting a Grip on the Leica Q: The Match Technical Thumbs Up EP-SQ grip Review

By Ashwin Rao

Hi everyone,

I recently had a chance to test out a production proof of the Thumbs Up EP-SQ grip for the Leica Q. For those of you who aren’t familiar with Match Technical’ s Thumbs Up grips, they are mountable on a camera’s hot shoe and provide a nice firm rest upon which to rest the thumb. Many people who shoot Leica cameras, which can be slippery in hand at times, prefer to add these grips to the camera. They act similar to how the film-advance levers of days-gone-by work as thumb rests. I can honestly say that this is a great ergonomic addition to the already fantastic Leica Q, adding that little extra bit of purchase that makes Match Technical’s Thumbs Up grips so popular.

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One “criticism” of the Leica Q is that the thumb indent, which Leica astutely placed on the camera’s rear, is a bit too far off to the edge of the camera and creates hand fatigue if solely used for gripping. I definitely found this to be an issue and addressed the issue in part by adding Leica’s own baseplate/grip. The EP-SQ design uses the indent as a method for securing the grip in place, while adding a nice rest that places the photographer’s thumb in a more comfortable position for shooting.

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One important added benefit of this Thumbs Up is that its design limits inadvertently bumping the Diopter adjustment dial(adjacent to the EVF), which often does go out of whack without protection. The grip effectively limits access to this dial, which is a good thing, as it prevents shirts or other factors to bump the deal and cause your EVF to be thrown out of focus.

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Unfortunately, by mounting the Thumbs Up EP-SQ on your Leica Q, lose access to the hotshoe, but with the Q’s ISO capacities, a flash is rarely needed. This, to me, is a small price to play for the ergonomic benefit of having a better grip on the camera.As an owner of the Thumbs Up Grips for the Leica M8, M9, M240, M246, X1, and Fuji XPro-1, I can confidently say that that Thumbs Up EP-SQ does much of the same for the Leica Q as it does for those cameras….it adds a nice secure grip if one feels that they require more than the Leica’s own offerings.

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I personally use the Thumbs Up in conjunction with Leica’s baseplate grip, for a really firm grasp and a camera that’s well balanced for me (not front heavy). However, may prefer to use their cameras with just the Thumbs-Up Grip, and I can confirm that using the camera in this manner feels quite secure as well.

Below are a few more pictures of the grip. I have been a fan of the Match Technical’s Thumbs Up designs for nearly a decade, and I suspect that you too will enjoy the experience of using a Thumbs Up on the Leica Q.

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You can find pre-order options for the EP-SQ through Match Technical’s own site, or through many of Leica’s own authorized dealers.

http://www.matchtechnical.com/Pages/purchase.aspx

Steve’s Leica Q Review – HERE

Ashwin’s Leica Q Review – HERE

Jul 192015
 

Join Me on Facebook and YouTube for upcoming Exclusive coverage!

facebook

Hey Guys!

Facebook…

Happy Sunday! Just wanted to share a reminder to come on over to my Facebook page for SteveHuffPhoto and give it a like! When it hit’s 50K likes I will be doing a cool giveaway, so head on over and click LIKE! I will be posting some new exclusive news updates there in the next 2-3 weeks on something you all want to see, Sony A7RII coverage, and many things will be posted to the Facebook page that will not be here, so be sure to check it out! STEVEHUFFPHOTO.COM FACEBOOK PAGE IS HERE!

YouTube…

Also, I will be doing many more videos coming up here real soon for my YouTube channel, including the A7RII coverage SOON so be sure to check out my YouTube channel HERE and Subscribe! LOADS of new stuff on the way and by subscribing you will be sure not to miss any of it!

THANK YOU!

Jul 182015
 

Hey Steve and Brandon.

My Fuji X100T has just arrived, and I thought I’d share some of the pictures from my first morning walk. I decided to go to a spot I know well. I mean it’s hard enough to get to know a camera for the first time, if you add to that a location you don’t know… well you get the picture!

This is big! At least for me. I have alway loved street photography, but never had the nerve to go out and take pictures of random people in the street. And since my main camera is a Canon 7D, It’s kinda hard to be unnoticed when that damn shutter claps away!! I mean, It’s called “Cannon” wright?!

Well, I guess there’s a first time for everything, and this was my first time shooting street action. And, let me tell you, I couldn’t be more pleased with it; both the performance from the Fuji X100T and the resulting images. Some say “Well it’s ok and everything, but ist’s no full frame!” to what I respond “Sure it’s not, but I’m not getting payed for my images (I’m not a professional photographer) ; and even if I was, an APS-C Type sensor is more than capable of producing great images.You don’t need full frame for that!”

Others gasp “It’s only 16 megapixels, wright?!”; what leads to a sligtly grumpy response from my part “Why would I need more? I don’t print mural nor building sized photos! I rarely print photos, which I regret; and when I do the biggest prints are 8×10. So I guess 16 megapixels is more than enough. Not to mention the storage space it saves me!”. Oh and don’t get me started on that whole lightroom RAW development “issue”. I know that, probably, there are other softwares that might be “better” at developing Fuj RAW files. And that if you sharpen the crap out of your images in Lightroom you might get the watercolor effect. Honestly, I didn’t notice it when I developed my pictures with this camera. Then again, I’m not looking at my files at 200%!! Just kidding, or maybe not !-)

No really; I know It’s not perfect. Although I love the X100T, I’m not blind to all it’s flaws. But like all good partnerships, It doesn’t come without it’s quirks. I’ll just have to kow, what and where they are so I can deal with them.

All in all, It’s just a fun camera to shoot. At least for me!! But enough talking, here are a few shots from my walk.

Thanks guys, and keep up the good work.

Bye for now.

João Vieira

 A father and a son, turn as they hear a helicopter flyby. The kid, of course, stares at the boats; while the father searches for the helicopter.

01_Father_Son

 Keep in mind, this place is full of people wlaking and running. But somehow, this guy just seemed slightly off. I don’t know why but, Johnny Walker comes to mind!!

02_Keep_Walking

 This lady had a very gracious walk, she could have been Grace Kelly’s long lost sister. Not that she had one!!

03_Lady_Hat

 

Jul 182015
 

My Experience with the Voigtlander 15 Mark III

by David Farina

VL15mmVIII

This is my second article here. My first one was a short review of the amazing and tiny Voigtlander 40mm 1.4. Since then, a new Voigtlander lens found its way to my camera bag; the Voigtlander 15mm 4.5 III. I have to admit that I’m a total ultrawide-angle lover. Images produces by such extreme wide-angle lenses have something to them that makes you feel like you were there on that moment. And this is after all one of my biggest goals in photography. I want the viewer of my images to feel the way I felt when taking the pictures. I want the viewer to have an idea how the place looked, and this works best with an UWA in my opinion.

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I primarily bought that lens because I became a total fan of the 40mm 1.4 from Voigtlander, and this lens surely does not disappoint. The lens itself is not as small as the 40mm but its still tiny compared to the Sony FE 16-35. The finish and build quality is as good as can be. The aperture smoothly clicks in half stops, the focus ring is dampened nicely and generally this lens feels good in my hands. This lens has a built in lens hood, so forget about using your existing filters on that one (except you own 58mm filters). When I received the lens, it felt like the focus ring would be a bit stuck when I turned it. However, this disappeared after a few days so I guess it just needed to get used – and thats what I did:

Why did I get this lens? One could say that it is redundant getting this lens when you already have the superb Sony FE 16-35, but theres a clear difference. First, 15mm is quite a bit wider than 16mm, I was actually surprised that it is substantially wider. The second thing is, it is extremely small. I wanted to have choices when I go out to take pictures; a small and light set for travelling or quick trips consisting of the A7R, A7S, 40mm 1.4 and this lens. This pretty much covers all my needs, and weights as much as my 6D (that I sold yesterday) with one lens. That way, I dont need to swap lenses, I just grab the right camera.

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and a crop:

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I think the boring part was hard enough to read, so lets get to the interesting things like sharpness! I’ve been using that lens on my A7R most of the time, which is great for testing sharpness of a lens. The lens seems to be plenty sharp, already by f/4.5 which is wide open for this lens. When stopping down to f/8 or f/11 which is the lens’ sweet spot, you get tack sharp images from corner to corner. Yes, it competes the Sony FE 16-35 in that regard! I found it best to shoot at f/8 or higher and just leave the focus at 1m on the distance scale for hyperfocal focusing. This is better than autofocus as you don’t have to focus at all! Without hesitating I can say that this lens is amongst my top 3 sharpest UWA lenses I’ve ever used, which is impressive considering the size and cost of the Voigtlander 15mm. There are, however, some drawbacks. It is a rather slow lens in terms of aperture, which makes it a lot less useful for example for astrophotography than the Samyang 14mm 2.8. If you shoot interior or real estate handheld, you might also be limited when light is not that great.

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How do the colors render with this lens? I found the Sony FE 16-35 to be too sterile in many situations but when I took the Voigtlander out for the first time, I found it gave me rich and popping colors. The colors are nicely saturated but still natural. I also found that it renders green and blue tones better than the 16-35 which is fantastic for landscape photographers. Pair the sharpness with the amazing colors of this lens and you get a fantastic UWA for landscapes. Like the Voigtl‰nder 40mm 1.4, this lens also seemed to render brown tones in a very pleasant way.

A drawback of that lens is purple fringing. This lens has plenty of chromatic abberations in contrasty, sometimes also in less contrasty areas in edges and near the frame. I also found it to be quite difficult to remove in post-processing, althought I was able to get totally rid of it with a few tricks. This is maybe this’ lens biggest fault, but I can live with that.

What really surprised me is the amount of distortion this lens has. I found it to have almost no distortion other than perspective distortion. This makes this lens also suitable for architecture and other subjects with a lot of straight, perpendicular and/or symmetrical lines. It is impressive how well corrected this lens is, as I find 15mm to be extremely wide (widest I’ve used so far). What I think is also worth a mention is how this lens renders flares. Sunstars look great and flare occurs only when directly pointing at a bright light source. The coating of this lens prevents a lot of flares and ghosts, which is surely a good thing, as the sun or a street lamp often find its way into the image. This lens also renders beautiful 10-pointed sunstars!

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Many people were asking if this lens works better on the A7R than the version 2. I can say that the images do look great, but in very rare occasions it can happen that there is a slight magenta cast or vignetting. It seems to happen when it is very bright, but I can’t say for sure. Due to the fact that in real world this issue only happens maybe in one of a few hundred shots, it is negligible for me and will not hinder me to come to a positive conclusion:

Now will this lens stay in my kit in coexistence with my 16-35, or does one of them need to go?
This lens is very good, period. It is plenty sharp corner to corner, it has fantastic colors which I found to be way more appealing than colors some modern lenses give, it has not much distortion, it is small and the price is just about right. Did I mention it is sharp? I’ve never used a Leica lens, but judging from samples I’ve seen I’d say if you’re about to expect Leica-like micro contrast you’ll probably be disappointed. But like I already said, this lens is as sharp as Sonys fantastic FE 16-35. This little lens is definitely a keeper!

You can check out more images on my new website and 500px:

www.davidfarina.com
www.500px.com/david_farina

Happy shooting everybody!

Steve’s thoughts on this lens can be seen HERE.

Jul 152015
 

Hi Steve and Brandon! First of all thanks for the great website.

My photography journey began some 15 years ago with an old Olympus (It may have been one of OM series) that I picked up from a second-hand store. I didn’t know a lot about it back then apart from what I did or didn’t like when I saw the final print. Dabbled a bit with the chemicals but I didn’t have a ready access to a darkroom so doing it properly was difficult.
Life took over and I don’t even know what I did with the Olympus. I think I left it in a flat while I was moving.

As I became a parent and started taking pictures of my children I started to enjoy photography again, and a recent purchase of X100s opened up a whole new world – one of quality RAW files – one most of you guys are accustomed to already.

While I’m very happy with the colours straight out of X100s I am quite nostalgic of what I used to find from the old films so I tend to apply VSCO filters and try to get as close to the days when I would struggle with Kodaks and Ilfords.

Photo 1. This was taken in a shade under a harsh light and the original file was quite underexposed AND desaturated. Some time was spent on PP to find the right colour but I’m still glad that I didn’t use a flash for this. It seems that X100s is little soft at f2 (or I keep missing the focus). This is at f2.8 which to me is much easier to get a sharper image. 500s, ISO 1000
Photo 2. We were building a tent and my daughter wanted to help, so she picked up a hammer. Late afternoon light. f2, 250s, ISO200. I think I had the ND filter on.

Photo 3. On my old Olympus I often struggled to get higher contrast on my Ilfords for some reason (most likely due to my lack of knowledge on metering, exposure and light direction) and I was always envious of my friends’ shots with good contrast and deep blacks. It’s a lot easier nowadays thanks to Lightroom. Also, I use manual focus for pretty much all the time (autofocus on X100s is not terribly reliable) and I’m quite annoyed that I missed the focus on this shot of my daughter by some margin. f2, 500s, ISO400.

One day I would love to go medium format or Leica on film and do some fine art photography. As for now, there’s no money or time for that so I’ll stick to my digital and my children.

Thanks

Francis Joung

 This was taken in a shade under a harsh light and the original file was quite underexposed AND desaturated. Some time was spent on PP to find the right colour but I’m still glad that I didn’t use a flash for this. It seems that X100s is little soft at f2 (or I keep missing the focus). This is at f2.8 which to me is much easier to get a sharper image. 500s, ISO 1000

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 We were building a tent and my daughter wanted to help, so she picked up a hammer. Late afternoon light. f2, 250s, ISO200. I think I had the ND filter on.

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 On my old Olympus I often struggled to get higher contrast on my Ilfords for some reason (most likely due to my lack of knowledge on metering, exposure and light direction) and I was always envious of my friends’ shots with good contrast and deep blacks. It’s a lot easier nowadays thanks to Lightroom. Also, I use manual focus for pretty much all the time (autofocus on X100s is not terribly reliable) and I’m quite annoyed that I missed the focus on this shot of my daughter by some margin. f2, 500s, ISO400.

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Jul 142015
 
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Sony RX100 IV Review. The Original Pocket Rocket Blasts Higher!

By Steve Huff

You can order the RX100 at B&H Photo or Amazon!

Wow, time has sure FLOWN by since the original RX100 Mark I was released and in my hands. I remember that camera arriving to my house for review like it was yesterday. Small, fast, a 1″ sensor that performed like a larger one and the video capability that made it a perfect go anywhere small high quality camera. That RX100 did very well for Sony, so well in fact that today in 2015 we are already on the Mark IV version of the RX100. While it looks 90% the same as the old Mark I, and 100% the same as the Mark III, the new Mark IV is the best of the RX100 series to date, and while the improvements from the III to this new IV are small, if you are looking for a pocket camera, the Mark IV may be the best out there today.

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Before you start to read this review, please take a look at my previous RX100 reviews as most of what is in the Mark IV is in the Mark III so I will only be sharing some photos and some experiences I had with the new IV after mentioning the new improvements from the III. This will be a short review as I have said most of my praises in the previous reviews of this dynamite camera.

See my RX100 Review HERE

See my RX100 III Review HERE

I skipped the Mark II as I felt it did not have enough improvement to warrant a full review. ;)

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So let me start by saying the RX100 IV is still as beautiful as ever, but now we get some new improvements that keeps it as the premier pocket “do it all”  camera. Sure we have the Ricoh GR and new upcoming GRII, with a larger APS-C sensor and all but this RX100 IV will deliver some amazing features such as 4K Video shooting, Slo Motion 960 Frames shooting, 1/32,000S Shutter Speed for those bright sunny days and a new stacked sensor that offers the best IQ and ISO performance yet.

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While in my hand it feels, looks, smells and operates just like the RX100 III. We still have the pop up and out EVF that is very small nut useful on Bright Sunny days, and the swivel out LCD that gives us the best way to take selfies ;) Let me just say right now that this is almost the perfect selfie camera. I do not care what anyone says, SELFIES are HUGE! If I am out and about in a big city shooting I see maybe 100-200 selfies being taken during the day when I am out. It is every where and we have social media to blame for this new phenomenon. It’s crazy but a reality so I love the way Sony has implemented the Selfie Mode in the RX100. Flip up the back LCD so you can see it from the front, smile, press the shutter and the screen will countdown from 3 to 1 and then snap the shot.

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You can turn off the countdown but if doing a group selfie everyone will know when the shutter will fire! So it’s a cool feature to have even if you will never use it. I messed around with the selfie mode combined with the High Contrast B&W mode…

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With the 24-70 built in f/1.8 – 2.8 lens we get  wide angle with a bit of mid telephoto and at the wide end we get f/1.8 aperture speed, so we can use this little guy in all kinds of light. As I said, it is basically the RX100 III with some enhancements to the sensor and video. Here are the specs of the Mark IV Rx100:

20.1 MP 1″ Exmor RS BSI CMOS Sensor (stacked backside illuminated sensor)

BIONZ X Image Processor

Internal UHD 4K Video & S-Log2 Gamma

Zeiss Vario-Sonnar T* f/1.8-2.8 Lens

24-70mm (35mm Equivalent)

2349k-Dot OLED Tru-Finder Pop-Up EVF

3.0″ 1229k-Dot Multi-Angle Xtra Fine LCD

Slow Motion Video at 960 fps

Built-In Wi-Fi Connectivity with NFC

Native ISO 12800 and 16 fps Continuous Shooting

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So we know have a backside illuminated sensor which is giving us the native ISO capability of 12,800. We are also getting  16FPS continuous shooting and as well as slow motion video capabilities at 960 FPS. This is so cool to have in a little pocket camera. 4K video clips up to 5 minutes are now possible as well.

You can order the RX100 at B&H Photo or Amazon!

“No line skipping or pixel binning and with minimal moiré or visual aliasing. The XAVC S format is utilized to maximize high-bitrate shooting up to 100 Mbps for professional-quality video. When recording in either the NTSC or PAL video standard, creative potential is further extended with the ability to capture Super Slow Motion High Frame Rate movies at up to 40x slower than real time. These slow motion clips are recorded at 960 fps, 480 fps or 240 fps and can then be played back at 1920 x 1080, in 60p, 30p, or 24p when the camera is set to NTSC. When set to PAL, slow motion clips are recorded at 1000 fps, 500 fps, or 250 fps and can then be played back at 1920 x 1080, in either 50p or 25p. At resolutions below 4K, including Full HD 1920 x 1080p, movies up to 29 minutes in length can be saved.”

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So with the new capabilities the RX100 IV is a treat and joy to use. Below is a shot taken at ISO 6400, with standard NR in an OOC JPEG. This was shot in a pretty low light environment and when I saw this on my iMac screen I was pretty impressed. Yea, there are some tell tale signs of noise reduction but this is ISO 6400 JPEG in a small tiny pocket camera!

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As I used the RX100 IV in my travels from Phoenix to Atlanta to South Florida recently the camera never gave me one issue. From the desert 110 Degree heat of the desert to the 95% humidity in Florida the RX100 IV just worked. The AF was fast as it always has been with this camera and the accuracy spot on. When I would pull it out of my pocket it would power on quickly and be ready to shoot within moments. It just worked, and worked well it did. The IQ is not going to be anything like what I get from my A7II and 50 Loxia lens but at the same time, it is much better than what my iPhone 6+ is giving me so I am happy to carry it with me. With WiFi and NFC on board it is simple to get the photos from the RX100 IV to my phone of choice.

Click images below for larger size to see how they were meant to be seen. These are all OOC Jpegs with the bottom two images using the cameras built in High Contrast B&W Mode.

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Below is a full size OOC file using HC B&W, click it to see what came out of the camera in regards to detail and rendering..

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Slow Motion Video – 960 FPS

The one feature I thought was cool on this camera is the Slow Motion video feature. I remember being teased by this super slo motion YEARS ago with the original Nikon V1. While it was allowing us to record slow motion it was playing it back in a super low resolution. With the Sony RX100 IV we can play back 960 FPS video in super slow motion in full HD. It’s a pretty cool thing. Below is a sample of how slow 960FPS shooting actually is after I talk a bit about the camera:

Press play below to see my RX100 Video including the slow motion samples!

So there yo go. The new RX100 IV is a super pocket rocket that will not disappoint. It is nice to look at, nice to hold, nice to use. It is responsive and fast just as the RX100 always has been and the image quality is about as good as it gets in a small 1″ sensor. This Sony delivers the goods yet again and for me, would be my pick for best pocket camera in 2015 EVEN THOUGH there are others with larger sensors. For me, this Sony offers me a little of everything so when I want video, I have it. When I want Slo Motion I have it, when I want super fast AF and great IQ I have it, if I want a great selfie, I have it.

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The RX100 IV is NOW available and NOW shipping.

You can order it at B&H Photo HERE

You can order it at Amazon HERE

If you do not need the new features like the new sensor tech, the new 4K video features, the 960 FPS shooting or 1/32,000S shutter speed then maybe you should consider the RX100 III, II or I as ALL are still in production and being made. Sony is offering us a level of pocket camera, so we can choose whatever we desire. I thought this was quite cool as from Version I to IV, all are fantastic and highly capable pocket cameras.

Order the RX100 V1 – $448

Order the RX100 V2 – $598

Order the RX100 V3 – $798

Order the RX100 V4 – $948

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ME, if I were buying one RX100 today for my pocket needs I would go with either Version I or IV. Version I is great as well and while it is missing the pop up EVF, the backside illuminated sensor, 4K video and other new modern day bells and whistles it still takes an amazing photo for a pocket camera. Version II and III are slight upgrades but you get the most bang going from I to IV. All are fantastic and Sony has proven that a pocket camera with a small 1″ sensor can really deliver the goods. 10 years ago this type of thing did not exist and if it did it would have cost $3000.

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Can’t wait to see what we have 10 years from now ;)

My Final Word on the RX100 IV

What you will read below is pretty much what my final word on the V III was, but updated for the Mark IV:

The newest RX100, or what I call it, “the Super Pocket Rocket 100″ (RX100 IV) is a real deal masterpiece of a point and shoot. From the design, the build, the pop out EVF, the full swivel up and down LCD to the fast lens and punchy color and pop from the files, the RX100 IV is a  joy to use and shoot with. Once again Sony hits it out of the park here, as they have been doing for years now. Sony is surpassing companies like Nikon, Canon, Leica in many areas with some of their recent cameras and they are showing no signs of slowing down or stopping. With cameras like the A7RII on the way any day now, Sony is delivering mirrorless cameras from the starter range (RX100 series to mid enthusiast range (RX10 II) to the Super Enthusiast and Pro Range (A7RII). Lenses are now plentiful with more and more coming soon.

Keep in mind, the RX100 IV will not and can not replace an APS-C or full frame camera (get the same results) as you just do not get the dynamic range, ISO performance or depth of field possibilities with the smaller sensor RX100. What you do get is a camera that is perfect for family use, vacations, world travel, and every day shooting. I have seen images from the RX100 (original) that blew away images I have seen from large DSLR’s, but that was from a VERY talented photographer. It seems that if you really know what you are doing then the RX100 of any variety (1, 2, 3, or 4) will reward you with its capabilities. I have noticed the DR is not up there with larger sensors as highlights can get blown, but it is not a big deal or deal breaker. The files from the RX100 IV are sublime and as good as you can get from a camera of this sensor size.

The lens is fast with a versatile and normal 24-70mm range. With an aperture starting at f/1.8 and slowing down to only 2.8, the camera is highly capable even in low light. The EVF works great and stays out-of-the-way until you need it. It is not the largest thing ever but it works and works well. The design is genius! The RX100 IV also has a built in ND filter which will automatically activate when needed though with a 1/32,000S shutter speed, you may never need it. You have all of the Sony usual tricks here as well like panorama, color modes, art modes and intelligent auto modes. This camera can be used by amateur and pro alike. In other words, Sony makes it easy to either pick up and shoot in full auto or delve into the camera and use manual features.

 

With the new sensor tech, the new 4K features and the new Slow Motion features and added high ISO capability this is the best Rx100 to date, hands down. What is really cool though is Sony is keeping all four models current and in production, so if you want to spend less, get an RX100 V1, want the best of the lot, spend a bit more for the IV!

VS Go Pro? I was recently going to purchase a new GoPro 4 and the full setup with camera, accessories, extra batteries, charger, etc was going to cost me around $800. After using this Sony RX100 IV I realized I may be able to use this camera for my on the go video needs and would have better quality footage, better audio, more features and a much nicer camera for stills. Sure, I lose the small GoPro design, the underwater capabilities and ultra wide lens but I gain IQ, Features, Sound Quality and Capabilities. What this tells me is that the RX100 V4 is pretty damn cool and able to double as a still camera, blogging camera, and even high quality B roll video footage capture to compliment my A7II and A7s.

All in all, this is indeed the best pocket camera ever made in the digital world. The price is steep at $950, but if you want the best/most feature packed and capable P&S available and do not want to mess with lens swapping and larger bodies, this is one way to go that will leave you satisfied. Another winner from Sony.

YOU CAN ORDER THE RX100 V4 AT B&H PHOTO HERE, OR AMAZON HERE!

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HLPHH

PLEASE! I NEED YOUR HELP TO KEEP THIS WEBSITE RUNNING, IT IS SO EASY AND FREEE for you to HELP OUT!

Hello to all! For the past 7 years I have been running this website and it has grown to beyond my wildest dreams. Some days this very website has over 200,000 visitors and because of this I need and use superfast dedicated web servers to host the site. Running this site costs quite a bit of cash every single month and on top of that, I work full-time 60+ hours a week on it each and every single day of the week (I received 200-300 emails a DAY). Because of this, I need YOUR help to cover my costs for this free information that is provided on a daily basis.

To help out it is simple, and no, I am not asking you for a penny!

If you ever decide to make a purchase from B&H Photo or Amazon, for ANYTHING, even diapers..you can help me without spending a penny to do so. If you use my links to make your purchase (when you click a link here and it takes you to B&H or Amazon, that is using my links as once there you can buy anything and I will get a teeny small credit) you will in turn be helping this site to keep on going and keep on growing.

Not only do I spend money on fast hosting but I also spend it on cameras to buy to review, lenses to review, bags to review, gas and travel, and a slew of other things. You would be amazed at what it costs me just to maintain this website, in money and time. Many times I give away these items in contests to help give back you all of YOU.

So all I ask is that if you find the free info on this website useful AND you ever need to make a purchase at B&H Photo or Amazon, just use the links below. You can even bookmark the Amazon link and use it anytime you buy something. It costs you nothing extra but will provide me and this site with a dollar or two to keep on trucking along.

AMAZON LINK (you can bookmark this one)

B&H PHOTO LINK – (not bookmark able) Can also use my search bar on the right side or links within reviews, anytime.

Outside of the USA? Use my worldwide Amazon links HERE!

You can also follow me on Facebook, TwitterGoogle + or YouTube. ;)

One other way to help is by donation. If you want to donate to this site, any amount you choose, even $5, you can do so using the paypal link HERE and enter in your donation amount. All donations help to keep this site going and growing! I do not charge any member fees so your donations go a long way to keeping this site loaded with useful content. Thank you!

Jul 122015
 
husick thumbtack

husick thumbtack

Thumbtack: A Photographer’s Business Partner or Something Else?

By Brad Husick

I met a photographer last week who mentioned a web service to me that offers professionals a way to find new customers. The site is called “Thumbtack” (www.thumbtack.com) and it allows you to build a profile and specify the type of work you offer in your area, then matches this to requests from consumers.

The business model is that consumers pay nothing and professionals buy sets of credits they can use to bid on the work. Initially, a set of 24 credits cost $34.99. Different job quotes require different numbers of credits, but for example a corporate headshot quote costs 2 credits and a commercial photo shoot costs 4 credits.

The consumer receives up to 5 quotes and can decide among them or to hire outside the system or not at all. There is a notification to the professional when the quote is read, and if the quote is not read within 48 hours the site refunds the credit to the account. The consumer can click to contact the professional with questions before deciding on one.

It all sounds easy, so I signed up to give it a try. I created a professional profile with gallery photos and a detailed biography and description of my available services as a photographer. I have been a life-long photographer with several photos published in magazines and the New York Times, so I thought I’d have a fairly good chance of landing some business through the Thumbtack service.

In the past week I have received roughly a dozen requests for photo work. I have replied with quotes to 9 of these requests with reasonable prices within the ranges asked for by the consumers. In one case I quoted significantly under the range to see if I could get a reply. Some of the requests filled up to 5 quotes quickly while others had only 2 quotes including mine. My quotes offered generous time and deliverables and highlighted my professional experience and dedication to quality and to creating images that would bring the customer joy.

In total, I have received zero replies from consumers and zero jobs. I have no idea if these consumers are real people or if the requests are genuine. Thumbtack lists some doublespeak about their quality control process of reducing spam requests, but there’s no way for the professional to tell if the requests are real. On one quote this is the automated email I got from Thumbtack: “We see that Janelle D. viewed your quote and your profile but may not have followed up with you. It looks like Janelle received 4 other quotes on this commercial photography request and has not hired another Thumbtack professional. Janelle viewed the quote of, profile of, and messaged other pros.”

To test the system, I signed in as a consumer and created a request for a web designer to create a simple web site for me. I left the budget flexible to be discussed. I live in the Seattle area, so I was expecting all 5 quotes to be filled almost instantly. After 48 hours, I got an automated email from Thumbtack saying, “We sent your request to web designers in your area, but unfortunately we couldn’t find anyone who was available, interested, and qualified to complete your project.” I find it impossible to believe that in Seattle there are no web designers looking for some simple extra side projects. According to Thumbtack there are hundreds of thousands of professionals across the country providing services in over 900 categories ready to help me, and yet not one web designer in the greater Seattle area.

As far as I can tell, Thumbtack is a complete scam. They collected $34.99 from me and I will not be buying any more of their useless credits. If Thumbtack charged the consumer even $1 per request, I might start to believe that the requests are from actual consumers, but they have stated that requests will always be free. If someone from Thumbtack reads this they are likely to reply with something like, “You have to create a lot of quotes before you get your first gig, and then you can build your list of feedback/reviews, and then you’ll get more gigs.” This is what they have said on some discussion boards I found online. It sounds fishy to me – just keep taking our diet pills because you won’t lose weight until you take lots of them.

I will use my few remaining credits to respond to requests with quotes at ridiculously low prices to complete my experiment. I doubt I will be contacted, but I am willing to try. Caveat Emptor.

Jul 102015
 

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Olympus Zuiko 7-14 1st Look

by Ted Krohn

Today I picked up my Olympus Zuiko 7-14mm f2.8 Pro. The sharpness is stunning and while I am not an expert on lens design, etc., Olympus once again has created a winner! In case you want to share them with your readers, I am attaching some pictures I took this afternoon of flowers in our garden. I am stunned at how close this lens allowed me to get to the flowers (7.9 inches although it seemed closer).

To some degree even a more pleasing rendition of close-ups than my dedicated Olympus 60mm macro lens. Also, in addition to the focus ring that can be snapped back to allow manual focusing, another neat feature on this lens is an elongated button (L-FN) on the upper left side of the lens that allows autofocus to be locked when you depress it. A somewhat heavy Dude of a lens with all that glass, but what a jewel of a performer!

You can order this lens from B&H Photo HERE. 

At 7mm

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

At 14mm

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

At 14mm

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

© 2009-2015 STEVE HUFF PHOTOS All Rights Reserved
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