82 Comments

  1. All of your photos are beautiful but I especially love the unusual photo of the duck. This is not your typical National Geographic photo. With all of your photos, what did you do in post? Thanks.

  2. Wonderful work indeed, Peter, and inspiring as usual! The Noctilux at 0.95 is so special indeed! Thank you for sharing.

  3. Excellent work. I recently added the M system and Noctilux to my gear. I was very reluctant to set down my Canon 85 f/1.2 II and 200 f/2.0, but after learning how to use this lens, which is a process, they have become quite lonely in my cabinet.

  4. Photo #4 is unbelievable. Seriously fine images all round, but the one of the boy is astounding.

  5. Nice pictures Mr. prosophos… Although I´m pretty sure all these would work just as well *if not better* stopped down a little. Ultra-thin dof is a means, not an end in itself.

    • Thanks lcki. It’s difficult for me to say whether you’re correct or not… I know when I shoot wide open the light and lens rendering convey a feeling that I just can’t capture when my lens is stopped down. The dreaminess is lost, as it were, and it’s the dreaminess that I seek.

  6. Peter your family photos nice as they are, i find uncomfortable to view as i am a stanger.
    I find this online fad of people sharing family photos with strangers rather distrubing whilst also taking away the privacy and intimacy of family.

    Theres hundreds of other subjects of objects to photgarph which can show ones abilities.

  7. awesome photo….
    is that picture is pure come out from camera or you have do some post processing in PC?

  8. Easy to understand your opening comment “I like photographing life around me with my Noctilux, wide open @ f/0.95.

    —Peter .

    Wonderful images thank you for sharing them with us.

  9. Great photos showing your talent and the unique and beautiful rendering of this masterpiece of a lens. If the Noctilux was not this heavy, your post could convince me to exchange 3 of my m lenses for it and leave it permanently on the M9.

  10. Great pictures! The contrast and rendering are great. I’ve noticed with Noctilux photos that sometimes they look a bit soft. Is this because the extremely shallow depth of field can be difficult to get right? Photos 1 and 3 are an example of this. Most of the other ones are crazy sharp though! (And I don’t want to get into a debate about how important sharpness is… Just asking out of curiosity). Nonetheless, amazing images!

  11. Such nice post. Peter is The guy who knows to work with a noct. Congrats always beautifull images.

    • Thank you Gage… I have the advantage of a great camera ;)… another inside joke….

      (I tried posting another response, but it didn’t show up).

  12. I like the look of the pictures taken with the noctilux, even though focusing must be a challenge (I find it hard to nail it sometimes with the Summilux that I have just bought…) I also wonder about the weight and size of the Noctilux : I cannot see how I could use it for street photography. This being said, nice pictures!

    Thomas

    http://www.thomasveyre.wordpress.com

  13. I always enjoy looking at your work but I think it is more the photographers eye than the lens personally.

    • Thanks Ross. I concur – ideally the lens should help translate the photographer’s vision, not define it. I don’t know where I am in that process.

  14. I’m not so sure about the Noctilux fad. I find the photos too mysterious and un-real especially when the lens is used wide open. The eye never sees this way and the photographs become little paintings in a strange world. Sure there must be a great satisfaction in owning such an expensive and beautifully made lens and camera, but I’m getting tired of the “look at me” Noctilux photography. Nice work thanks for showing.

  15. I’m a big admirer of your post-processing…please allow me a question, how did you shoot #6 (with the dark background) with 0.95? Whenever I try similar things, I do not get the background sufficiently dark. 🙁

    • I shoot with the window light on the face, in a dark room, and then apply progressive vignetting.

      You can’t always plan things with kids, so I look for the moments as they come.

  16. I have a theory about that, using hyper shallow DOF. It only works, IMHO, with “catchy” subjects (which of course have different subject matter for each individual) BECAUSE that is how our brain works when our eyes “catch” something noteworthy, beautiful, out of normalcy … we can focus the otherwise wandering eye and isolate that special spot.
    I love all my Noctis, but one should handle them with care, as nobody likes a one trick pony for long, or in other words, the Noctiluxed wall, rails, bridge ain’t that attractive for too long.
    LOL
    Alfred

  17. Pics 1, 9 and 10 are my favorites. I especially like the post processing on pic 10. It gives it a painting like quality. Some of the other pics are on the borderline of too heavy a hand in post processing IMO.

  18. I do love most of these but the danger might be that you end up with similar looking pictures – like using a fisheye for example.

    Having said that I am jealous that you have this lens, I would love one too 🙂

  19. Wonderful work Peter. Great seeing these grouped together. Can you please tell me which ND filter/s you are using with the Nocti ? Thank you for sharing your unique gift. Warm Regards, Jorge

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