New All Weather – Underwater – Any & All Situation Leica X-U

Leic

New All Weather – Underwater – Any & All Situation Leica X-U

Leica has announced another new camera in the form of a new X (Type 113). This time around Leica beefed up the construction to make it UNDERWATER, ALL WEATHER and ALL SITUATION. It is shock resistant as well. Basically a take anywhere, anytime Leica X 113. This is an X 113..same sensor, same insides, same IQ but it is built to be TOUGH.

Take a look at the Leica Press release below and see what they are saying about their new addition to their ever-growing line of cameras.

Where to order?

You can pre-order with Ken Hansen (khpny19@aol.com) or PopFlash.com or B&H Photo. PRICE? $2950

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BELOW: PRESS RELEASE FROM LEICA:

Introducing The First Outdoor & Underwater Camera From Leica: the Leica X-U (Typ 113)

The new shock-resistant, waterproof and dust resistant compact provides outstanding picture quality under even the harshest conditions

January 20, 2016 – Leica Camera today announced the newest addition to its range of cameras, the Leica X-U (Typ 113) – the first model designed specifically for extreme outdoor and underwater use. Incredible ruggedness and easy handling make this waterproof, shock-resistant, winterized and dust-sealed camera the ideal companion for every outdoor tour or expedition; great for action and underwater adventures, travel and landscape photography, even in full HD video.

Leica_X-U_top Leica_X-U_back Leica_X-U_floating carrying strap

Optimal picture quality with the Leica X-U is guaranteed by the same cutting-edge technology of all cameras in the Leica family. Combined with the high performance APS-C format CMOS sensor of 16.5 megapixels, its Leica Summilux 23 mm f/1.7 ASPH lens ensures natural color reproduction with maximum detail and sharpness, while the camera’s fast maximum aperture of f/1.7 allows for selective focusing. With its rugged underwater protection filter, the fully waterproofed camera guarantees pictures with exceptional brightness and clarity under even the harshest conditions and at depths of up to 49 feet.

Although all settings and features can each be changed individually, the intuitive handling of the Leica X-U follows Leica’s philosophy of a focus on the essentials. The options for automatic functions and the high-resolution, 3-inch LCD monitor help photographers find the precise settings in seconds, to avoid missing a moment. For the underwater photographer, the underwater snapshot button makes it easy to capture an image at the press of a button, without having to search through a menu.

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Made in Germany in collaboration with Audi Design, the stylish and minimal design of the Leica X-U ensures easy, intuitive handling and ultimate precision. The sleek, eye-catching camera features a top plate made from premium aluminium and an anti-slip TPE protective armor. Aluminium control dials show an attention to detail and an integrated flash above the lens provides exceptional picture quality when no natural light is available. Finally, the X-U’s non-slip body features a hardened protective cover for the monitor screen, with a failsafe double locking system for the battery compartment and memory card slot, to ensure total safety and control in all conditions.

When a single photo is not enough to capture the moment, the full HD video function of the Leica X-U makes it easy to capture moving pictures in high definition quality. The camera records video in a choice of 1920 x 1080 or 1280 x 720 pixel resolution at 30 frames per second in MP4 video format, delivering high-quality results that perfectly capture any adventure or journey.

The Leica X-U (Typ 113), priced at $2,950 will be available by the end of January at your local Leica Store, Leica Boutique or Leica Dealer.-U

30 Comments

  1. No disrespect to the red dot crowd but for $3K and these features, save $2700 and buy an Olympus tg-3. Crisp pics at depths of 50 ft. underwater. Damn near indestructible. Macro and zoom on land. Shot pics of Belize, Honduras, and surrounding areas that were magazine quality with only light retouching. The little powerhouse produced pics that I sold for publication and they paid for my trip plus a profit. Just sayin’.

  2. Hmmm, making something designed to cope with seawater out of aluminium isn’t the smartest thing to do!

  3. If Sony did this with the RX1rII it would be my only camera. And I wouldn’t buy another one until it died.

  4. For many years I have been waiting for a rugged camera with min. APS-C sensor like this and I am very happy to see this camera!

    Sadly this flash destroys the beauty of the design for me. Don’t know if I can get used to it… Hope there will be a version without this flash…

    • I will predict that there wil not be one without a flash as that is imperative for underwater work. Even if they did, they have a three year cycle, so wouldn’t be for three years 😉

  5. If you have shopped for a quality rugged/waterproof digital camera you know there hasn’t been much to choose from. Without getting in to housings and such, all have small sensors and are cheap plastic devices. Sure, The Leica X-U is expensive for a point-and-shoot but not for a Leica made in Germany.

    I would have been more excited with this camera had it been based on the Leica Q; a full frame sensor, faster autofocus, and wide lens (after applying the UW 1.33 refraction factor). I expect that you could combine the X-U with an Ikelite strobe kit for decent lighting underwater if you want to put more into the kit.

    About likely damage – people don’t realize that you need to take care of any device meant for use in salt water or sand. My built-like-a-tank Nikonos V requires careful inspection and greasing of the o-rings before every immersion and patient rinsing in fresh water after every use. With great care a well made device can last a very long time when submitted to harsh conditions.

    Of course while it is more work, you might be smarter to just get an Ikelite housing for a Canon EOS M3 and have an APS-C interchangeable lens kit that is compatible with EOS lenses, can be taken on deep dives, and save a little money (and maybe feel less guilty if it got damaged one day.)

  6. in my experience with other companies’ “rugged” cameras, they last a lot less than my regular cameras. all it takes is a little sand to get on one of the rubber seals or a little salt water to get in. i have found these rugged cameras to be more like disposable cameras. so i don’t see spending 3k for one. unless they have come up with a way to have no compartments to have to open at all, then maybe.

    • The major problem is people, not the equipment. This sort of equipment absolutely relies on the operator to actually prepare and check the camera (same goes for housings) before each outing. If you get lazy and neglect the proper set up then it is your fault when that sand on the gasket causes a leak.
      Same as if you drive a car on bald tires it’s the driver’s fault, not the car maker, when you skid and crash.

  7. Been waiting about 40 years for an update to the Fujifilm HD-M. Nice to have a ruggedized camera with more than tiny 1/2.3 sensor!
    After destroying 2 DSLRs and 5 compacts in the last seven years taking them fishing, tramping, boating, this could be the answer to my insurance company’s prayers.
    And I should be able to afford it!

  8. It is odd because the flash on this is so underpowered that you would really want f/1.7. Especially underwater! The majority of underwater photography is done close up so if it is true that they have not changed the lens issue from the X 113 then this is going to be a dud. And I’d be disappointed because I quite fancy one!

  9. I feel like I may be in the minority here, but I’m rather excited by this camera. I applaud Leica for releasing such a (uncharacteristic for Leica) camera. I have long since wanted a genuine rugged, take anywhere camera, but never liked the IQ compromises of the small sensor rugged compacts that typically serve this niche market. Though the 35mm (equivalent) lens is not likely to please the typical action/sports photographer, I’m thrilled to see it!

    Alas, $3000 for this camera is pretty steep. I think I’ll be waiting for the price to come down, if ever that were to happen.

    • Same camera, same lens, same everything. Just weather proof/underwater now. Nothing has been changed with the camera – still an X inside the new tough housing.

      • tough taste of design to absorb for 3K.
        X-U: in germany that would mean they’d convince/trick you an “X” for an “U” – one thing for another, worse for better. Strand name choice by a german company, worst design choice by Audi yet, hard to surplus.

      • Even in manual mode with the lens set to f/1.7, if you get too close to your subject the lens will stop down automatically, and you can not stop it. So you can not take a shot at f/1.7 up close or close in. With a true 1.7 lens you can use it at any usable distance at 1.7.

        • f/1.7 describes the maximum aperture. “The f-number accurately describes the light-gathering ability of a lens only for objects an INFINITE distance away” so it is a true f/1.7 lens.

          • Nonsense. That is a dictionary type definition. To a real, working photographer, if an aperture is not listed as being “variable aperture” he/she expects that he can shoot at the maximum aperture any time he/she choses. Personally, I’ve never even heard of a fixed lens having a variable aperture. Makes no sense.

          • The X 113 has this and has since release a couple years ago (see reviews). The Q has it to some extent but for the Q it is only for Macro, which is quite acceptable.

          • This comment is fairly misleading. Leica’s f/1.7 in this case isn’t what every other camera maker’s f/1.7 means. It has become customary (universal really) to list a range of f-stop values when a lens varies on this value (for example, a 3.5-5.6 zoom lens). Leica has chosen to list only the most favorable f-stop value when stating a range would be more informative, precise and customary.

        • i think, the focal length changes in macro mode, like my nikkor 60mm, 2.8. So the same aperture diameter will no longer be a 1.7 aperture, if the focal length changes from 23 to 35 for example.

        • Steve’s point should be well taken. Get close enough and the camera will override your 1.7 setting. If you don’t get that close it isn’t too big a deal but to some of us 1.7 means 1.7.

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