Film Friday: The Festival on Film by Mark Ewanchuk

Film Friday: The Festival on Film

by Mark Ewanchuk

Each summer we are fortunate to have the “Edmonton Folk Music Festival” at an outdoor park here in our city–often featuring an excellent collection of talented artists.
This year the weather was less than cooperative (severe winds Thursday evening, and a massive downpour Sunday night…) but the show (and photography!) was still enjoyable.  These were taken with a Leica MP, and the Zeiss 35mm f/1.4 ZM lens, on Agfa Vista 200 and Fuji Superia 200.  They were self-developed at home, and scanned on the Noritsu LS-600 scanner.
For those interested, a guide to colour film development remains on my site.  (If you can do B&W, you can certainly do colour!)
Warmest regards to all your readers.
-Mark

 

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13 thoughts on “Film Friday: The Festival on Film by Mark Ewanchuk

  1. hah..small world!!!
    I looked at the images firstly without reading the introduction…I recognized the skyline then went back to read that these images were from Edmonton.
    I know people from around the world post stories/images here at Steve’s site but it’s oddly cool to see images here on this (international) site from my home town.

  2. These have charm in the best sense of the word; and for me the little girl lying on the grass takes the top prize even if less filled with flare, backlighting, etc.! I like the way you’ve off-centred her so that the grass is more than just negative space.

  3. I can confirm that if you can develop b&w film, you can develop color too, from first hand experience! I’m no specialist, though, so I’d love to learn from you. Your shots have a remarkable fine grain, and I would appreciate if you published what chemicals (brand) you used.

    1. Hi Ivan,

      The chemicals I use are usually a rebrand of the Tetanal/Colortec C-41 powdered kits. This particular one was from Argentix.ca (highly recommended for the Canadian buyers!)

      The grain, I think, has more to do with shooting the film at base ISO (i. e. Not pushing the film) using lower speed films, very gentle agitation at development, and the particular scanner utilized.

      Best regards,
      Mark

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